Microsoft COO disputes Apple's "post-PC" statements

Apple executives such as the late Steve Jobs and its current CEO Tim Cook have said in separate Apple press events that we are living in a "post-PC" world. The implication is that desktop and notebook PCs, most of which use Microsoft's Windows operating systems, are becoming less and less important.

Today, in a speech at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference, its chief operating officer Kevin Turner disputed those previous comments from Apple execs. He told the audience in Toronto that we are actually living in a "PC plus" time period.

According to The Verge, Turner said that while "Apple makes great hardware," he added:

We believe that Apple has it wrong. They've talked about it being the post-PC era, they talk about the tablet and PC being different, the reality in our world is that we think that's completely incorrect.

Naturally, Turner said that the launch of Windows 8 later this year will help people move into this new "PC plus" era, saying, "We believe with a single push of a button you can move seamlessly in and out of both worlds. We believe you can have touch, a pen, a mouse, and a keyboard." Certainly, the launch of Windows 8 and its tablet-centric first cousin Windows RT will represent Microsoft's ideas for this PC plus era.

Source: The Verge

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23 Comments

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I completely agree with Kevin and Tim Cook is just wrong. first he compared tablets and computer like refrigerator and toaster which is a stupid comparison and then he talks about Post PC era which is unrealistic since everybody use PC (In different forms of Laptops, Desktops, Servers, Tablets ....)

It's not about Apple or Microsoft. It's about how people use their devices. I don't want the clutter, weight, and bloat of a PC on my pocket. It's a post-PC era.

We need to stop acknowledging this "post-PC" comment by Tim Cook as something that he truly believes. It was an intentionally arrogant comment and wishful thinking intended to **** off Microsoft, but even Apple knows that it's a crock of ****.

We've seen many devices move toward the traditional PC environment. Even Apple's products become more "PC" like as time goes on - look at the evolution from the original iPod to the iPod Touch/iPad.

I would have to say that PC and more mobile solutions are going to merge, leading to a "PC plus" type era.

until you can replace the PC, we will not be in the post PC era. the ipad does not replace the PC because it lacks a productivity mouse/keyboard based ecosystem. touch is cute, but it ain't the future of all computing. It may be that way for small devices but ultimately, what makes touch work in the small phones makes it fail on the large form factors.

that's why windows has it right. you need dual systems. anything else is a mistake.

Form factors will change, but people will not settle on 'lower speed' because Apple makes it cool.

As processing power increases, so will the need and consumption of the processing power, no matter what form factor.

There are a lot of people that still buy DESKTOP computers because they can get 16-64 CPUs/Cores and 256GB of RAM.

The use of computing power has always been a driving force and no matter how many times Apple clicks their heals together and wish, high end computing power will still be used by people.

As computing power and connectivity increases, a majority of computing devices will disappear, as they will be a part of our environment instead of separate devices.

However, this does not mean the world will give up the functionality of a full OS technology like NT to have a limited feature OS like Android or iOS.

In all fairness, many (probably most) people will happily settle for lower raw specs when it comes to hardware. And I'm okay with that. The majority of people don't need to be part of the technology train and are better off with consumption and service-oriented products. And I'm okay with that, too.

There will always be some 'core' demand from the enthusiasts. Those products will gradually get more expensive as market forces push competition into consumption devices and other ways of experiencing tech (part of our environment, as you say--I agree with that being the direction things are going). I'm okay with that, too.

It's a big part of why I grimace when I hear people say things like "Everyone should learn a programming language!" That would be idiotic, have an unwelcome impact on the profession, and is completely unnecessary from any angle (these people will be on devices they can't program). Don't get me started on people who think politicians should. Talk about herp derp.

I like the idea of the workstation becoming a niche/enterprise market. I don't see bad things coming from it.

Joshie said,
In all fairness, many (probably most) people will happily settle for lower raw specs when it comes to hardware. And I'm okay with that. The majority of people don't need to be part of the technology train and are better off with consumption and service-oriented products. And I'm okay with that, too.

There will always be some 'core' demand from the enthusiasts. Those products will gradually get more expensive as market forces push competition into consumption devices and other ways of experiencing tech (part of our environment, as you say--I agree with that being the direction things are going). I'm okay with that, too.

It's a big part of why I grimace when I hear people say things like "Everyone should learn a programming language!" That would be idiotic, have an unwelcome impact on the profession, and is completely unnecessary from any angle (these people will be on devices they can't program). Don't get me started on people who think politicians should. Talk about herp derp.

I like the idea of the workstation becoming a niche/enterprise market. I don't see bad things coming from it.

I agree most people don't mind lower end specifications; however, lower end features is another thing.

If you could have an iPad or a similar device that was 10x faster, and had 100x the functionality, would you still want the iPad? (BTW This is what Windows 8 RT and Windows 8 is bringing this year.)

The other problem is the 'lower end' specification will not exist if they are not created as high end specifications first. Using your theory, the industry would flatline and we would all be happy with a 80286 or 68000 CPU.

It is the need for power, and what that brings users that creates the need for and thus the next generation of technology.

There are a lot of people that are happy waiting literally minutes to open a spreadsheet on an iPad, or 1/2 a minute to navigate to a location on a spreadsheet. This does not mean that users won't love Excel on Windows 8 on the same class of device that is 20 to 100 times faster. Part of the 'ok with' attitude, is people haven't seen what is possible even with limited specs.

OnlyUsernameThatWasFree said,
Bunch of people installed windows on their macs proving that mac is a pc with iOS software
Simple as that

Well, not iOS... OSX.

And this happened in 2007 when Apple switched from IBM PowerPC cpu's to Intel C2D.

OnlyUsernameThatWasFree said,
Bunch of people installed windows on their macs proving that mac is a pc with iOS software
Simple as that

I'd do this too if I was ever given a Mac. I've heard many many good things about Windows 7/ Windows 8 on Mac hardware.

DarkSim905 said,

I'd do this too if I was ever given a Mac. I've heard many many good things about Windows 7/ Windows 8 on Mac hardware.

Exactly! Sexy Apple hardware and MS software, win win combination

OnlyUsernameThatWasFree said,
Bunch of people installed windows on their macs proving that mac is a pc with iOS software
Simple as that

Wait, so Macs run iOS all of a sudden?

The funniest part was about Siri,

They asked iPhone what was the best smart phone, it said Lumia 900 and whole audience, over 16k people laughed and clapped.

It was incredible

It would have been more fitting to say: "While Apple is indeed living in a Post-PC era, we're ushering into a PC-Plus era with our soon to be launched product portfolio".

margrave said,
The iPad is a form of personal computer... a p.c.

Therefore their comment and argument was and is invalid.


But can it play Crysis?

yowanvista said,

But can it play Crysis?

No, but it would be pretty useful to bash you over the head with for asking such a tired question