Microsoft demos Facebook using Silverlight and WPF

Microsoft's Brian Goldfarb, Silverlight Team, demonstrated a jaw dropping implementation of Facebook's recently announced API changes.

Goldfarb was presenting at a Facebook Demo day, Cnet news attended and recorded the session (see below). The applications demonstrated were built within 72hrs and Goldfarb confirmed Microsoft will be releasing them shortly. The applications demo'd blow away Facebook's original interface and demonstrate exactly how developers can build some visually rich applications for services like Facebook.

Microsoft and Facebook have been working together since 2007 via the Facebook Developer Toolkit – a first of its kind open source solution to help developers integrate into and build applications for Facebook users. Microsoft and Facebook are certainly forming close business relationships and I would expect the two companies to announce further integration around the Facebook chat to Windows Live Messenger area later this year.

For more information on "Faboolouse" and "Photo Cloud", which are demonstrated below, check out the Silverlight team site.

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Chrono951 said,
Wow, you must be one of the few people who thinks that facebook's current layout actually works well.


I think the new layout is great...it brings a hell of a lot more information right to the homepage than previous iterations.

DanielZ said,
Eww. I would never use that Facebook app. Microsoft raped it with their gloss and Vista-ness. I prefer the regular Facebook site over that- it's clean, simple, and not owned by Microsoft. Also, if Microsoft buys Facebook, I'm deleting my account.


what they showed looks way better than what it is now. seems like the only reason you dont want to use it is because you hate microsoft lol. if someone else did this same exact thing you would be all over it

DanielZ said,
Eww. I would never use that Facebook app. Microsoft raped it with their gloss and Vista-ness. I prefer the regular Facebook site over that- it's clean, simple, and not owned by Microsoft. Also, if Microsoft buys Facebook, I'm deleting my account.

Microsoft owns a stake in FaceBook.

DanielZ said,
Eww. I would never use that Facebook app. Microsoft raped it with their gloss and Vista-ness. I prefer the regular Facebook site over that- it's clean, simple, and not owned by Microsoft. Also, if Microsoft buys Facebook, I'm deleting my account.

Delete your account then, since Microsoft already owns part of Facebook.

Why haven't you deleted your account yet... If Mark Zuckerberg is billionaire it's only because of Microsoft buying $400M of shares from him...

I can just see my Mac fan mate at work crying the day he has to use a Microsoft designed App.

This looks very promising, I like how Microsoft are headed now with the internet.

is it running locally ?

because i don't think it is possible to load such amount of photos in less that 3 seconds.

It's running from the stream. It _may_ go and fetch everything on the first load (in the background). The stream has a finite size... you only have X amount of friends with Y amount of info.

If it finds new branches from friends of friends or public galleries, then it may go off and cache them too.

So...this guy's trying to impress people by claiming he put together his demo in 72 hours, but by the same token, the article mentions that MS and Facebook have been working on their developer toolkit since 2007...

My question is: was this guy (who wrote the demo) part of the team who wrote the SDK? If so, then what they really should be saying is that it took someone who's been working on this stuff for roughly two years 72 hours to put the demo together...

If you want to impress me, prove to me that someone who doesn't already have 2 years worth of experience with the SDK can write that in 72 hours.

That's a rather dishonest way of trying to impress people, is all I'm saying...

It continues to amaze me that MS is held to standards that applies to no other developer. You see this ALL the time so much so that the assumption that when people advertise being able to do X in Y time, it does not apply to those who are currently new to the technology.

From there, if you want to, you can guesstimate how long a noob would take to learn. Learning is a one-off investment. It makes no sense to judge how fast one can develop using the SDK by using a noob since being a noob is a temporary thing and everyone has different rates of learning which would be affected by how good the documentation is, quality of tutorials and quality of support.

The Facebook demo was just a little something developers put together to DEMO some of the cool things they did with silverlight. The keyword being DEMO. The 72 hour bit wasn't there to impress people, but to get people to overlook some of its shortcomings.

r3volution said,
The 72 hour bit wasn't there to impress people


...then if the time to put it together is a moot point, why bring it up at all?

kheldorin said,
It continues to amaze me that MS is held to standards that applies to no other developer. You see this ALL the time so much so that the assumption that when people advertise being able to do X in Y time, it does not apply to those who are currently new to the technology.

From there, if you want to, you can guesstimate how long a noob would take to learn. Learning is a one-off investment. It makes no sense to judge how fast one can develop using the SDK by using a noob since being a noob is a temporary thing and everyone has different rates of learning which would be affected by how good the documentation is, quality of tutorials and quality of support.


You misread me. I'm not attacking Microsoft here as a whole or trying to hold them to different standards. In fact, I've been called a Microsoft cheerleader on more than one occasion.

Besides--and I'm not sure if that's what you're trying to say--the learning curve is not meaningless if you're trying to sway people into commiting to your dev tools. Sure, it's a one-off investment as you put it, but such investments can still be measured and compared.

To top it all off, it makes me rather uncomfortable when MS switches from v1 to v2 to v3 in what, less than 2 years? On one hand--great, the platform is being evolving--but on the other, it's difficult to justify using something when it's such a fast moving target.

Have you ever tried .net 3.5 and all it's features ? It's really impressive and if you know the tools you can do much more in less time. Here the windows App is using a MS Api to create apps that work with picture (all the transition effects/animations are already in the api... search the web), they only modified it to get the pictures from facebook.

So 72hrs are a possible developing time for those two apps.

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