Microsoft dismisses Windows 7 "battery problems"

Microsoft said on Monday that users experiencing battery warnings from Windows 7 are by design.

Last week Neowin revealed reports of users receiving notifications that they should replace their laptop battery. The warning is triggered when a laptops BIOS detects a battery replacement is required. Windows 7 provides the following alert: "Consider replacing your battery. There is a problem with your battery, so your computer might shut down suddenly." Some users claimed their laptop battery's had gone from two hours battery life to 30 minutes whilst others threatened class action lawsuits assuming the software giant had "permanently damaged" their laptop battery. 

Microsoft officials confirmed on Monday that the company looked into the issue fully and found no problems with Windows 7. " In every case we have been able to identify the battery being reported on was in fact in need of recommended replacement," said Steven Sinofsky, Microsoft President of Windows. In a company blog posting, Sinofsky also stated "To the very best of the collective ecosystem knowledge, Windows 7 is correctly warning batteries that are in fact failing and Windows 7 is neither incorrectly reporting on battery status nor in any way whatsoever causing batteries to reach this state."

Microsoft has received 20 customer service incidents and states none of these have shown anything other than degraded batteries. "The notifications appear to be working as they were designed to do from what we’re seeing" said a Microsoft Spokesperson. From the reports that Microsoft has seen across the Internet they "seem to be from people who don’t realize that this is new functionality in Windows 7 that just wasn’t available previously," the spokesperson confirmed.

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38 Comments

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ok, it is ODD.

I received the warning message even when the battery was working without any trouble.
And now and suddenly, the warning message is gone

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2766/4342941615_662ea135fe_o.jpg

:-?

smooth_criminal1990 said,
I get this all the time on my Acer

But then it IS an Acer with a 10 minute battery life at the best of times...

my friend has an acer 6920g and gets the battey problem when using windows 7 ultimate 64 and 32 bit versions but not with Vista both 32 and 64 ultimate. also running on batterey better with both Vista 32 and 64 ultimate. the bios has been updated but hasnt fixed the issue. and even a brand new batterey is having problems.

i didnt have this problem when using both 64/32 RC version win7.

It does have a mechanism but it depends on many factors for it to properly function and one of them is the BIOS to push out the right info.

I have an old laptop about 3 years old now and it actually has this capability and Linux(Ubuntu) can detect it.

whilst others threatened class action lawsuits assuming the software giant had "permanently damaged" their laptop battery.

WTF? Who the hell threatens lawsuit without even knowing what they're talking about? Geesh.

Nightwind Hawk said,

WTF? Who the hell threatens lawsuit without even knowing what they're talking about? Geesh.

People that are just out for the money...

BIOS BIOS BIOS! - people update your damn BIOS. I don't know how many times I had clients complain about this and I read up on the BIOS update and BAM it was the cause. I can't stand it when people are so quick to jump on Microsoft for anything they can without understanding how things REALLY WORK.

Complaint happy person: "I don't know what happened! My 5 year old laptop with the original battery was working until I installed Windows 7 on it and now I get this report that my battery might need to be replaced! OMG! WTF! MS did it!"

In a previous DELL laptop I had a battery that was fried by the BIOS. The updated BIOS caused the problem and then Dell corrected it in another update a few weeks later. They replaced it under warranty but it happened at the BIOS level. Windows doesn't control the Voltage, etc at the BIOS level. As many have mentioned - it only reports it.

mrmomoman said,
BIOS BIOS BIOS! - people update your damn BIOS. I don't know how many times I had clients complain about this and I read up on the BIOS update and BAM it was the cause. I can't stand it when people are so quick to jump on Microsoft for anything they can without understanding how things REALLY WORK.

Complaint happy person: "I don't know what happened! My 5 year old laptop with the original battery was working until I installed Windows 7 on it and now I get this report that my battery might need to be replaced! OMG! WTF! MS did it!"

In a previous DELL laptop I had a battery that was fried by the BIOS. The updated BIOS caused the problem and then Dell corrected it in another update a few weeks later. They replaced it under warranty but it happened at the BIOS level. Windows doesn't control the Voltage, etc at the BIOS level. As many have mentioned - it only reports it.

There is that fear of updating the bios though.

Udedenkz said,

There is that fear of updating the bios though.

This does fare true actually. I remember trying to flash a new BIOS on my HP laptop only to say it is successful, I reboot as the flash program wanted, and BAM NO POST. I had to wait a week for Fedex to deliver my box, to get it fixed, and to be returned to me with a new mobo. Stupid Google Chrome gave me a corrupt download as it mostly had (Version 3 stable at the time). I am avoiding Chrome until Google fixes those corrupt downloads issue and I'll reconsider putting chrome as another free browser.

Karo - 323z IT said,

This does fare true actually. I remember trying to flash a new BIOS on my HP laptop only to say it is successful, I reboot as the flash program wanted, and BAM NO POST. I had to wait a week for Fedex to deliver my box, to get it fixed, and to be returned to me with a new mobo. Stupid Google Chrome gave me a corrupt download as it mostly had (Version 3 stable at the time). I am avoiding Chrome until Google fixes those corrupt downloads issue and I'll reconsider putting chrome as another free browser.

Hm... This is the first time I've ever heard another person mention this download corruption problem. It happens very rarely to me, but I do have maybe 1 out of every 10 downloads get corrupted... I haven't been able to figure it out. I use Firefox for 99% of my browsing, so I do most of my downloads through that browser, but I do use Chrome for quick browsing and articles and such...

The corrupt download issue happens with me too, except, when I try to download it with another browser it happens with that browser as well. It's usually a server-side problem and nothing to do with the program. You should try to troubleshoot before spreading FUD, this alone would fix a huge percentage of the FUD that's out there.

Please correct the headline.... "Microsoft dismisses Windows 7 battery problems", it is a load of bull. It's not a Windows 7 battery problem. It's a laptop BIOS battery problem. Windows is just reporting what the BIOS is telling it. This is in no way, shape, or form a problem with Windows.

TCLN Ryster said,
Please correct the headline.... "Microsoft dismisses Windows 7 battery problems", it is a load of bull. It's not a Windows 7 battery problem. It's a laptop BIOS battery problem. Windows is just reporting what the BIOS is telling it. This is in no way, shape, or form a problem with Windows.
"Report a problem" link.

It's probably better described as "Microsoft dismisses claim that Windows 7 is source of battery problems", something like that?

Kirkburn said,
It's probably better described as "Microsoft dismisses claim that Windows 7 is source of battery problems", something like that?
I agree, they did not dismiss a "Windows 7 battery problem", they dismissed claims that there was an issue.

TCLN Ryster said,
Please correct the headline.... "Microsoft dismisses Windows 7 battery problems", it is a load of bull. It's not a Windows 7 battery problem. It's a laptop BIOS battery problem. Windows is just reporting what the BIOS is telling it. This is in no way, shape, or form a problem with Windows.

There's nothing wrong with the title.

Tom W said,

There's nothing wrong with the title.
It depends on how you comprehend the title.....when I first read it, I was thinking MS was confirming there was an issue, but is not going to fix it. It made sense after I read the first few lines of the article though.

The only problem I see with the front page article is the image they used. How about a little consistency?

I would like to be able to glace at the front page without reading anything and say "hey, there's an update on that previous article."

Edited by Ned, Feb 9 2010, 2:24am :

Nagisan said,
It depends on how you comprehend the title.....when I first read it, I was thinking MS was confirming there was an issue, but is not going to fix it. It made sense after I read the first few lines of the article though.

I agree. The title makes it sound like Microsoft is just dismissing the claims and not resolving the issue... The title is misleading.

The whole "battery issue" is pure bull****.
The beta testing was really fine and well made with lot of accuracy. So this is a non problem, unless you buy failed batteries made in china or wherever similar cheap...

I'm not defending Microsoft, even when this falls in the "is not a but, its a feature" category but is more than likely the user's batteries are at fault.

new feature ha!!!!!! Thats what i thought last week when this issue was raised and it it said the trigger was caused by Bios.