Microsoft Drops Lawsuit Against FairUse4WM

Late last year, a team of coders found a way to strip the WM DRM system from media files, allowing playback of said media on any device, with a tool called FairUse4WM. Claiming the creator of the tool had infringed on copyright laws, Microsoft launched a formal lawsuit on "Viodentia," the creator of FairUse4WM after a fix was released but was quickly cracked again. Microsoft failed to find "Viodentia" after several months of searching and has submitted a Notice of Dismissal, removing all claims against "Viodentia". According to the dimissal, Microsoft said: "Please take notice that plaintiff Microsoft Corporation (Microsoft) respectfully dismisses all of its claims, without prejudice, against John Does 1-10 a/k/a "viodentia." Microsoft was unable to locate these defendants through discovery and therefore could not serve them with process."

Bill Gates stated publicly late last year that he was against DRM, and that removing DRM from media and devices ultimately benefits the consumer. Recently, Paul Thurrott reported that Microsoft would offer DRM-free music.
Coincidence or completely unrelated?

News source: DailyTech

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respectfully dismisses all of its claims, without prejudice


Without Prejudice, simply put.....means that if they do find him, Microsoft has reserved the right to file the charges again, or complete the first filing.

Microsoft hasn't yet given up......though without prejudice does have it's time limits.

Bill Gates stated publicly late last year that he was against DRM, and that removing DRM from media and devices ultimately benefits the consumer. Recently, Paul Thurrott reported that Microsoft would offer DRM-free music.

For the 1st time I hear Gates talking like a real corporate head...

I refuse to buy music on-line, reason mainly is I don't want to be fored to shell out for a device it can only be played upon.

Even if all downloads become DRM-Free, still not buying downloaded music.

However, good news for those that do download it legally and then can play it on any device.

In other words, you feel entitled to steal music just because you're above paying for it. How very mature.

People like you are the reason the RIAA has to launch their stupid lawsuits.

C_Guy said,
In other words, you feel entitled to steal music just because you're above paying for it. How very mature.

People like you are the reason the RIAA has to launch their stupid lawsuits.

He also could have meant he's going to buy the CD, which will play on numerous devices in his home and his car. And if he wants to walk, he can rip his CD to the player of his choice, at the quality of his choice.

iTunes is by far the most successful download service. But considering the average number of iTunes songs per iPod is 25 (2.5B songs divided by 100M iPods), it's obvious that very few people pay for a download service for their music...in other words, he's not the only one.

I think they dropped it over a few things, but more so that DRM is on it's way to be killed off and that it's good PR to drop the lawsuit and show a stand in DRM.

I'm still waiting for PT's article where he'll take credit for making it happen. He'll say he's known this all for months now.

:P

Does he use to take credit for making things happen? :/

I know he use to have his sources for info to "know" things, but I see no reason to doubt that (his sources), and that's unrelated to taking credit anyway. Also, just because one have sources doesn't mean he's right... That goes for him as well as Neowin reporters or whoever, because even officials aren't always right about the future and plans change. Personally, I'm unsure if it's just jealousy or childishness at play with these kind of comments...

bangbang023 said,

More like they couldn't find the guy. It's right there in the article lol.

What a company's PR says isn't necessarily what happened. I was just starting up some discussion. I mean, is it possible that Microsoft found him but dropped the case for other reasons (their change of view on DRM?). It's hard to believe that Microsoft can't find someone, surely they have the resources to do so. Even if they didn't find him, why suddenly stop looking?
I'm undecided on the matter, hence the question

Slimy said,
What a company's PR says isn't necessarily what happened. I was just starting up some discussion. I mean, is it possible that Microsoft found him but dropped the case for other reasons (their change of view on DRM?). It's hard to believe that Microsoft can't find someone, surely they have the resources to do so. Even if they didn't find him, why suddenly stop looking?
I'm undecided on the matter, hence the question :)

Their PR department didn't say anything. That quote would be from paper work done by their legal department.

This is all rumor so who knows if any of it's true.

A letter was sent to doom9 from Microsoft asking for information on him and they tipped him and the others off and that's when the main guy vanished and doom9 wouldn't give them any details.

I honestly don't see that being true, but it's all I've ever heard about it. I don't see Microsoft not being able to track the guy down and asking doom9 for assistance in it. I do think they at least tipped him off before it became public knowledge though. He vanished and like 2 days later is when it was said Microsoft was looking for him so it looks like he had a head start LOL. I know there were people on doom9 posting messages that he had sent them and those people were admins if I remember correctly.

It's not a rumor, and hardly a lie either... :p

http://www.blogsmithmedia.com/www.engadget...ms-document.jpg

For once a story comes with evidence like this and some still believe it's a conspiracy. :confused:

I don't see Microsoft not being able to track the guy down and asking doom9 for assistance in it.

All Doom9 can do is help them with the first step by giving an IP address. But if you're doing these sort of things, it's more than likely going to a proxy server, and it's up to law enforcement to deal with that maze, not unlikely turning into a world tour from Kazakhstan to China to Israel, etc. If he left very little "fingerprints" on the web, I don't find this story hard to believe. Besides, MS would have a lot to lose by a scandal if they lied in documentation like this. It would take on proportions this case isn't really close to.

Slimy said,
I mean, is it possible that Microsoft found him but dropped the case for other reasons

Yah, new conspiracy theory was born already. Bill Gates wrote that tool and evidences speak for themselves:

a) Bill Gates stated publicly late last year that he was against DRM
b) If you carefully mix and replace letters in word "Viodentia" you will get "Microsoft"!

so when Microsoft PR tracked him down to his foxhole (read "office" ) in the middle of testing it on his favourite Britney Spears song "I did it..." they decided to suppress the truth which is out there... somewhere...

I subscribe to a music service, and plan on continuing my subscription. But I use this tool because DRM isn't supported in a lot of programs. Or on my Mac. I think it's a wonderful tool. I don't host my "cracked" music, and I'm continuing to pay for it, so I think this program is a great benefit.