Microsoft: Dual-core LTE Windows Phones are coming

Microsoft's head of its Windows Phone division, Andy Lees, says that future smartphones that run the mobile operating system will have support for dual-core processors as well as the faster LTE wireless networks. In a chat with AllThingsD.com, Lees says that Microsoft wanted to wait until its software could better handle more than one mobile processor core. However, Lees claims that as far as the current Windows Phone 7 devices, "They’re all single core, but I suspect that they will be faster in usage than any dual-core phone that you put against it, and that’s the point."

As far as LTE support, Lees says that Microsoft wants to make sure that any Windows Phone 7 products don't have issues with battery life with any LTE technology. He says, "The first LTE phones were big and big (users) of the battery, and I think it’s possible to do it in a way that is far more efficient, and that’s what we will be doing."

Lees also talked about Microsoft's recent patent deal with Samsung deal that will give Microsoft revenues from each Android-based smartphone sold by Samsung. Lees says the agreement will also see Samsung work closer with Microsoft on future Windows Phone 7 products. He says, "I think that the agreement that we have with Nokia, it’s obviously a particularly special one, they’re exclusive to us, and we have a very, very deep partnership, and I think that Samsung is not quite as deep a dependence as the Nokia one, but it’s certainly in that vein."

With the recent release of Windows Phone 7.5, otherwise known as Mango, Microsoft is now working on the next major update to the operating system. Lees says that Microsoft may or may not release a relatively minor update to the OS before the next major release.

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I don't need a powerful phone for encoding 1080p video. That's what my dedicated DSLR is for and then I can process that on my beastly Core i7 machine!

SHoTTa35 said,
Well glad they are getting things "updated" but just remember battery life is most important in mobile devices! Ok?!

That was design mantra #1 for Mango cycle, they will not compromise.

The stuff that needs a dual core will be stuff like games, as someones mentioned about 1080p recording and other processor intensive tasks but as far as normal use goes, no need for dual core. These advancements need to be made with hardware and software running as best as they can together for when they start stitching this stuff in clothes and that shazzle

Be funny seeing android powering an ermm android at mcdonalds and cus it lags they burn the burgers throws the take outs at that customers, spills drinks all over the floor and gives you £200 in change at the till

psionicinversion said,
The stuff that needs a dual core will be stuff like games, as someones mentioned about 1080p recording and other processor intensive tasks but as far as normal use goes, no need for dual core. These advancements need to be made with hardware and software running as best as they can together for when they start stitching this stuff in clothes and that shazzle

Be funny seeing android powering an ermm android at mcdonalds and cus it lags they burn the burgers throws the take outs at that customers, spills drinks all over the floor and gives you £200 in change at the till

There's certainly plenty of good reason to put dual cores in Windows Phone. Heck, there are times where Mango apps actaully get less CPU power than they did in 7.0 simply because of background tasks sucking up their power. With even a very simple dual core setup, you could put foreground applications 100% on one core, and background tasks and phone services (radio, alarms, push, etc.) on the other, end up with something more responsive and probably using the same amount of power as current WP devices - with the scope of being able to be greatly more functional once they put more effort into it.

~Johnny said,

With even a very simple dual core setup, you could put foreground applications 100% on one core, and background tasks and phone services (radio, alarms, push, etc.) on the other, end up with something more responsive and probably using the same amount of power as current WP devices - with the scope of being able to be greatly more functional once they put more effort into it.

Not to mention moving the JavaScript compiler thread to a dedicated core would really help heavy browser experiences as well.

If WP7 fans are to be believed there is zero need for dual core WP7 devices. Any mention of dual core on alternative handsets on Neowin received nothing but criticism for being unnecessary and only required for 'Slow-poke' Android. It'd be interesting to see their views now.

Hollow.Droid said,
If WP7 fans are to be believed there is zero need for dual core WP7 devices. Any mention of dual core on alternative handsets on Neowin received nothing but criticism for being unnecessary and only required for 'Slow-poke' Android. It'd be interesting to see their views now.

Says right in the article: "They're all single core, but I suspect that they will be faster in usage than any dual-core phone that you put against it, and that's the point."

The OS certainly doesn't need dual core to function smoothly. That isn't to say that certain apps won't benefit, though. Plus it makes the phone more future-proof.

Hollow.Droid said,
If WP7 fans are to be believed there is zero need for dual core WP7 devices. Any mention of dual core on alternative handsets on Neowin received nothing but criticism for being unnecessary and only required for 'Slow-poke' Android. It'd be interesting to see their views now.

Here is your basic argument;

1) WP7 users say their single core phones run faster than any dual core android devices
2) WP7 will one day support dual core

Therefore #1 is false???

Hollow.Droid said,
If WP7 fans are to be believed there is zero need for dual core WP7 devices. Any mention of dual core on alternative handsets on Neowin received nothing but criticism for being unnecessary and only required for 'Slow-poke' Android. It'd be interesting to see their views now.

Nope, it still doesn't need it. lol

Hollow.Droid said,
If WP7 fans are to be believed there is zero need for dual core WP7 devices. Any mention of dual core on alternative handsets on Neowin received nothing but criticism for being unnecessary and only required for 'Slow-poke' Android. It'd be interesting to see their views now.
Current dual core processors are battery hogs right now, and there is no immediate need for the WP7 OS to support dual core processors at this stage since WP7 today already runs very smoothly on the original first gen 1Ghz Snapdragon.

Of course, more processing power means more powerful functionality on the phone, like real time 1080p video encoding or processing, but what good is a powerful phone if the battery does not even last even a whole day?

I believe Microsoft is waiting for the right time to bring dual core/multi core support to Windows Phone when the hardware is ready enough. Not ready as in "available", but ready as in "mature enough". Pretty much like how the new versions of IE support Web standards, focusing only on what's ready and be really good at it.

Hollow.Droid said,
If WP7 fans are to be believed there is zero need for dual core WP7 devices. Any mention of dual core on alternative handsets on Neowin received nothing but criticism for being unnecessary and only required for 'Slow-poke' Android. It'd be interesting to see their views now.

Learn the definition of 'need' - for WP7 there is no 'need' for dual core as to have respectable performance but if there is a dual core available the performance benefits will be a lot higher than Android which requires dual core just to have acceptable performance. The argument is pretty basic - please keep up.

geoken said,

Here is your basic argument;

1) WP7 users say their single core phones run faster than any dual core android devices
2) WP7 will one day support dual core

Therefore #1 is false???

No... What your saying is so.. just wrong.

It's like saying:

1) Windows 7 users say their single core computers run faster than any dual core Windows Vista Devices.
2) I'm thinking of getting Dual Core.

Just because it doesn't need it, doesn't mean it wouldn't be nice to make it even faster...

geoken said,

Here is your basic argument;

1) WP7 users say their single core phones run faster than any dual core android devices
2) WP7 will one day support dual core

Therefore #1 is false???

1) Yes
2) Then it will be faster than your quad core phones.

I might give a **** about LTE if any carrier had LTE coverage within 100 miles of where I live. Maybe next year when I move I might bother to get one, because I'll be close to a city that has it.

edit: well, according to T-Mobile's map my city has 4G coverage, but it must just be in very limited areas, because once I get more than a mile or two away from downtown I begin to even lose 3G coverage on my HD7

Edited by roadwarrior, Oct 10 2011, 12:43pm :

roadwarrior said,
I might give a **** about LTE if any carrier had LTE coverage within 100 miles of where I live. Maybe next year when I move I might bother to get one, because I'll be close to a city that has it.

edit: well, according to T-Mobile's map my city has 4G coverage, but it must just be in very limited areas, because once I get more than a mile or two away from downtown I begin to even lose 3G coverage on my HD7

At least bits of your country has LTE, the UK isn't likely to see it for years.

Kushan said,

At least bits of your country has LTE, the UK isn't likely to see it for years.

Decent UK wide H+ coverage would be a start, hell I can only get G speeds (10KB/s max) unless I'm near dead centre of my closest town and even then the speeds are barely satisfactory.

roadwarrior said,
I might give a **** about LTE if any carrier had LTE coverage within 100 miles of where I live. Maybe next year when I move I might bother to get one, because I'll be close to a city that has it.

edit: well, according to T-Mobile's map my city has 4G coverage, but it must just be in very limited areas, because once I get more than a mile or two away from downtown I begin to even lose 3G coverage on my HD7

See, they probably have LTE at their stores and that's about it... That drives me absolutely nuts.

lt8480 said,
Yeah, HTC Titan seems more responsive than most Android phones I've played with using dual core.

Forget the Titan, all the gen 1 WP7 devices feel more responsive than any Galaxy SII's I've used.

geoken said,

Forget the Titan, all the gen 1 WP7 devices feel more responsive than any Galaxy SII's I've used.

+1. I'm all for faster devices, but WP7 doesn't honestly need it. If there is going to be a battery hit for going dual core, I say they shouldn't even bother. The user won't even notice a difference I'm willing to bet.

Good news. Though honestly WP7 is pretty snappy without it. My biggest thing right now is battery life. Though not a WP7 issue, it would be really nice if battery technology took a step forward here. It would be awesome to get 2 days out of a charge.

Yeah, battery tech is pretty poor right now imo. It's largely the reason why I've never had such a device. Same with laptops, 1-3 hours is pretty rubbish.

I can't believe you think it'd be awesome to get a mere 2 days of charge... crazy.
How about 2 weeks? Even then my phone can last longer than that.

It's not a challenge to get a laptop with 6-10 hours of normal use at budget prices these days. Getting a phone with 2 weeks of active use (not simply idling) isn't something I think you can pull off even in the most spartan feature phones. When someone says they want two days of charge, they usually mean two days of texting, calling, checking email, using apps, etc, not simply having it unplugged.

Joshie said,
It's not a challenge to get a laptop with 6-10 hours of normal use at budget prices these days.

A netbook maybe, but I seriously doubt your claim of budget notebooks with that kind of battery life.

roadwarrior said,

A netbook maybe, but I seriously doubt your claim of budget notebooks with that kind of battery life.

Mine went from an hour and a half to a little over seven hours with a battery change, and it was no netbook.

M_Lyons10 said
My biggest thing right now is battery life. Though not a WP7 issue, it would be really nice if battery technology took a step forward here. It would be awesome to get 2 days out of a charge.

I'm thinking of putting the old Focus on eBay and picking up an HTC Radar. 14h of battery life, under moderate use is better than the 7 I get today.

I'll take a hit in storage and screen tech for double battery life.

dotf said,

I'm thinking of putting the old Focus on eBay and picking up an HTC Radar. 14h of battery life, under moderate use is better than the 7 I get today.

I'll take a hit in storage and screen tech for double battery life.

Yeah. Just check because some of the HTC models are underpowering the batteries. Some devices have 1500 MaH batteries and some have 1350 MaH. It's a sizable difference really.

bdsams said,
This is what I have been waiting for, LTE or bust on my next device.

No one is rushing LTE since the carriers aren't ready for it. You'll have to wait for next year at least.

GP007 said,

No one is rushing LTE since the carriers aren't ready for it. You'll have to wait for next year at least.

Verizon in the USA is pushing LTE like crazy, heck they already have a large chunk of the USA covered