Microsoft exec gives insight on 'Roslyn' compiler

Matt Gertz, development manager for Visual Studio's managed languages, has made a detailed post about 'Roslyn' compiler which is expected to hit RTM in the near future.

According to Gertz's post, Microsoft is looking to replace the traditional compilers for VB and C# by implementing 'Roslyn' which is aimed at providing 'compiler as a service' or CaaS. Roslyn is expected to introduce a more open model for compilation allowing developers to reach inside the compiler itself and get detailed information about solutions and projects. The project aims at lowering the effort and cost of development.

Roslyn includes versions of the C# and VB.NET compilers written in the languages themselves. The compilers are available via the traditional command-line programs in addition to the APIs available natively from within .NET code. It exposes modules for analysis of code, semantic analysis, dynamic compilation to CIL, and code emission.

The project has been in development for quite some time and was initially expected to be released as an update to Visual Studio 2012 which was launched in September of 2012. However, it hasn't yet made it to the mainstream even after the launch of Visual Studio 2013 and is only available as a CTP. Apologetically Matt notes that, "Yeah, we do feel a bit embarrassed about that. Yes, we’ve been a little quiet. No, there was nothing wrong going on here, things were actually going extremely well."

Though the blog post fails to provide a fixed time line for the launch of 'Roslyn,' Gertz mentions that they are on a fast track to release the CaaS project as soon as possible and a more detailed official announcement would be made from the company in the near future.

Source: MSDN via ZDNet | Image via Microsoft

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28 Comments

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I haven't been following this project, so forgive the question, but how will this impact me? What benefits should I expect as a result?

I'm glad to hear something from the team, since it's been a bit quiet for a while. I don't care to see another preview, though. I'll just be anxious to see it integrated in the next version of VS. I'm sure there will be many delicious plug-ins created using compiler services.

"was initially expected to be released as an update to Visual Studio 2012"

No one really had that expectation and the Roslyn team certainly never announced it. Roslyn is now anticipated to be released with Visual Studio 2014 and .Net 5.0. Anders Hejlsberg pretty much said so in an interview from Build 2013.

Studio384 said,
I wonder if will ever see SaaS: Service as a Service.

That acronym is already taken -- Software as a Service -- which is basically what this is.

Torolol said,
WTF, with ALL CAPS interface?

Where?

of the text in the interface displayed on the screenshot.. there is not much in caps.

Max Norris said,
Takes a couple seconds to turn it off.

yeah, but whos bright idea to make ALL CAPS by default?

is there any reasoning on it?

Torolol said,
is there any reasoning on it?

Probably trying to keep it in line with a modern-like look, same as Office, etc. Not that I agree with it, but again, who cares, a few seconds and it's gone. That and switch it to the black theme.. the white is a bit hard to look at after a while.

pratnala said,
How do you turn it off?

Either via an addon (VSCommands, etc) or a registry tweak. For example, in PowerShell copy/paste: (replace 12.0 with 11.0 for VS2012)
Set-ItemProperty -Path HKCU:\Software\Microsoft\VisualStudio\12.0\General -Name SuppressUppercaseConversion -Type DWord -Value 1

Torolol said,
WTF, with ALL CAPS interface?

I don't think you can call the menu bar bring in caps "ALL CAPS interface"...

Torolol said,
WTF, with ALL CAPS interface?

Why are you making such a big deal about something so minor. People like to whine about anything nowadays

pratnala said,
does it work in 2013?

Yes, the command I pasted is for 2013. If you have 2012, then you'll need to change the version number from 12.0 to 11.0. VS2013 is version 12, 2012 is version 11. Confusing sometimes.

Jarrichvdv said,

Why are you making such a big deal about something so minor. People like to whine about anything nowadays

This. People just like to open their mouths about anything, no matter how freaking stupid it is.

Torolol said,
WTF, with ALL CAPS interface?

It's to keep consistent with all their applications, particularly Office. It may look odd in the screenshot but in the actual UI it looks really nice. Instead of complaining about nonsense, why not actually comment on what the article content.

j2006 said,

It's to keep consistent with all their applications, particularly Office. It may look odd in the screenshot but in the actual UI it looks really nice. Instead of complaining about nonsense, why not actually comment on what the article content.

That's just opinion. I happen to think it looks like crap. Visually Visual Studio 2010 looked far better than 2012 and 2013 in my opinion but the newer versions are far snappier and add nice features so the fact they look like crap shouldn't keep you from updating. THE ALL CAPS MENU is extremely annoying and was an incredibly stupid idea but as has been stated it's easy enough to fix. The ALL CAPS MENUS look like crap in Office 2013 as well but hey, at least they are consistently crappy.

I had to fire up VS because I couldn't remember if that change had already been made. Doesn't bother me at all, it visually separates the menu

You can also try this for Visual Studio 2013 instead of Office 2013

How to Change the Capitalization of Office 2013's Ribbon Bar

http://www.howtogeek.com/13667...-2013%E2%80%99s-ribbon-bar/

So it should work for Visual Studio 2013 as well.

You might expect that making such a change would involve editing the registry, but in fact it is something that is built into the Visual Studio suite. Right-click one of the tab labels and select the Customize the Ribbon option.

To the right hand side of the Visual Studio Options dialog, right-click one of the ribbon labels and select the Rename option. Enter the label you would like to use and click OK followed by OK.

You will find that the labels you have renamed retain whatever capitalization you typed.

Interestingly, as soon as you change the label back to its default, the capitalization changes to ALL CAPS mode once again. So what about if you want to keep the original label name, but only want the first letter capitalized?

The easiest way to do this is to rename each of the labels in turn, simply adding a space to the end of the default name - for some reason this forces Visual Studio to use a more conventional form of capitalization.

Unfortunately, there is nothing that can be done to adjust the capitalization of the File menu, but this simple tweak helps to improve the look of Visual Studio immensely.