Microsoft goes behind the scenes on Bing Windows 8 apps

Microsoft's Bing team created a number of apps for the Windows 8 and RT launches, including the News, Weather, Finance, Sports, Travel and Maps apps. Today, Microsoft offered up some more information on how those apps were created.

The official Windows 8 app developer blog reveals that the Bing division created the in-house app team about a year or so ago. All of the apps created by the team were made by using HTML/Java Script, with the exception of the Maps app, which was built by using XAML/C#. The blog states that all of the apps use client side caching, " ... to invest in prefetching and for the client to set the time to live of various pieces of data for a couple reasons."

Part of the reason Microsoft launched so many in-house apps was that it wanted them to serve as a model for third-party Windows 8 app creators in terms of supporting features. For example, all of the Bing-made apps support snap view, a top navigation bar, a bottom command button bar, the share, search and print charm Windows 8 contracts and more.

Windows 8 entered its RTM build well before it was released to the public in late October 2012. Between that time, the Bing apps team took some time to update the apps with a number of performance improvements, including "tuning the startup path in order to optimize CPU usage and I/O calls" and more.

There's quite a bit of technical information on how the apps were made and designed so if you have any interest at all in developing Windows 8 apps this new blog post will be of great interest.

Source: Windows 8 app developer blog | Image via Microsoft

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The Bing team does an EXCELLENT job with their apps. They're fast at updating them, keeping them up-to-date with content, and they're gorgeous.

The Xbox team and Mail/Calendar team need to take note!

Part of the reason Microsoft launched so many in-house apps was that it wanted them to serve as a model for third-party Windows 8 app creators in terms of supporting features.

It's obvious then that the teams responsible for the awful the Mail, Messaging, Music and Video apps didn't care as much as the bing team did.

They should spend more time in front of a coding table fixing the bugs and missing features in their desktop and mobile OS's.

Because the Bing division has always been in charge of the operating systems, right?

BTW: We should thank god they aren't, or they'd patch every problem with more ads.

You whiners need help. Ads bring in revenue for free apps, it's not surprising. Also, they only put like one ad, and it's NO WHERE near distracting as you see on websites or other mobile platforms. They did a pretty great job IMO.

j2006 said,
You whiners need help. Ads bring in revenue for free apps, it's not surprising. Also, they only put like one ad, and it's NO WHERE near distracting as you see on websites or other mobile platforms. They did a pretty great job IMO.

Those are NOT free apps, those are apps that come bundled with an operating system you have to pay for. Have you ever bought an xbox 360? This is how the dashboard main screen is now: http://i.imgur.com/vudbF.jpg , 2/3 of the screen taken over by ads, all that from a simple, single small banner on the original dashboard. With that trend I wouldn't be surprised if computers and consoles in the future will soon look like this: http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/5568/idiocracy3.jpg

BRB, need to watch the latest "Ow, my balls!" episode!

francescob said,

Those are NOT free apps, those are apps that come bundled with an operating system you have to pay for. Have you ever bought an xbox 360? This is how the dashboard main screen is now: http://i.imgur.com/vudbF.jpg , 2/3 of the screen taken over by ads, all that from a simple, single small banner on the original dashboard. With that trend I wouldn't be surprised if computers and consoles in the future will soon look like this: http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/5568/idiocracy3.jpg

BRB, need to watch the latest "Ow, my balls!" episode!


I call it content. Not ads.

When I see a tile trying to sell some futuristic toothbrush, that's an ad. This, sir, is content.

francescob said,

Those are NOT free apps, those are apps that come bundled with an operating system you have to pay for. Have you ever bought an xbox 360? This is how the dashboard main screen is now: http://i.imgur.com/vudbF.jpg , 2/3 of the screen taken over by ads, all that from a simple, single small banner on the original dashboard. With that trend I wouldn't be surprised if computers and consoles in the future will soon look like this: http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/5568/idiocracy3.jpg

BRB, need to watch the latest "Ow, my balls!" episode!


The apps are free, Windows 8 can be used without a paid license (i do not mean piracy, just not activating your Windows 8).

You can do the same with Windows 7.

Either way, it renders your argument invalid. Windows can be used freely (altho Windows functions get disabled and you only receive security updates).

Shadowzz said,

The apps are free, Windows 8 can be used without a paid license (i do not mean piracy, just not activating your Windows 8).

You can do the same with Windows 7.

Either way, it renders your argument invalid. Windows can be used freely (altho Windows functions get disabled and you only receive security updates).

Oh god... I really, really hope I just missed the sarcasm. Using Windows, be it before or after the 30 days, without a proper license IS breaching the EULA therefore it IS, without any doubt, piracy. Even the simple act of obtaining the disc or any media containing Windows without Microsoft permission IS copyright violation so you shouldn't even be able to own or install the software without a temporary or permanent license.

That said, even if you lived in Copyrightlessland (maybe on a raft in the international waters?), my argument would still be perfectly valid because it's commercial software that Microsoft expects to be paid for, since it's part of Windows. Even if it can be pirated or avoided to be activated (that still doesn't make it legal to own it) it's still software meant to be paid for.