Microsoft helps websites prepare for IE10 on Windows Phone 8

Internet Explorer 10 isn't just coming to Windows 8 and Windows 7. It will also be included on the smartphones that will run Windows Phone 8. That means many owners of the various new Nokia, HTC and Samsung WP8 devices will be surfing the Internet with the mobile version of IE10.

In a new post on the official Windows Phone developer blog, Microsoft gives some hints to website developers on how to prepare their sites for visits by IE10 on Windows Phone 8.  The actual UA string of IE10 running on Windows Phone 8 will be:

Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows Phone 8.0; Trident/6.0; ARM; Touch; IEMobile/10.0; ; [;])

The string shows that the Platform token will now simply be Windows Phone in the mobile version of IE10, rather than the previous Windows Phone OS.

While Microsoft has still not released the Windows Phone 8 SDK to the general development community, Microsoft describes a method that will allow them to test their site via IE10 on Windows 8. Microsoft says, "Windows Phone 8 shares the same Internet Explorer 10 engine with Windows 8, so a PC running Windows 8 is great for initial testing."

Source: Windows Phone developer blog | Image via Microsoft

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5 Comments

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I'm not a web developer, but why do you need the user agent string to prepare the website for specific browsers? (i.e. Why not develop the website with feature-detection to enable/ disable features, but rely on the user agent string?)

I mean, do you (web developers) find that it is infeasible to code the website conforming to the standards (perhaps check the HTML/ CSS documents using W3C validators) and then adjust the layout/ output using JavaScript, CSS or something like that?

alxtsg said,
I'm not a web developer, but why do you need the user agent string to prepare the website for specific browsers? (i.e. Why not develop the website with feature-detection to enable/ disable features, but rely on the user agent string?)

I mean, do you (web developers) find that it is infeasible to code the website conforming to the standards (perhaps check the HTML/ CSS documents using W3C validators) and then adjust the layout/ output using JavaScript, CSS or something like that?

It's not, in general people don't use user-agent detection, but there could be fringe cases where it's necessary, or as a quick fix to a site that was developed a while ago.

I haven't spent much time with IE 10, but MS has been touting it's conformity with standards, so designing for IE mobile should only be a matter of worrying about the resolution.

Nashy said,
So long as the mobile browser in WP8 is detected as a mobile device, then who cares?

uh... every developer out there should as well as the end users.