Microsoft invites hackers back for Blue Hat

On Wednesday, members of the hacking community willing to give Microsoft a hand arrived at Redmond, Washington, to show the software giant where it's gone wrong. This time the company's latest Blue Hat conference, typically held twice a year, targeted mobile security, hardware hacking, Microsoft's security tools, and the underground vulnerability economy. Microsoft began hosting these events two years ago as a way to foster dialogue between the company's security team and external security researchers, many of whom have been critical of the company's approach to security. The name Blue Hat derives from the Black Hat security conferences - the "Blue" part comes from the color of badges that Microsoft staffers wear on campus.

News source: InfoWorld

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Kudos for Microsoft. I appreciate the effort they are putting into security. Vista has definitely benefited from their new emphasis on security.

It generates a positive P.R. spin for Microsoft. They actually do get some attack vectors identified.

What else can Microsoft do (that they already aren't doing)? Hire Miss Cleo? :ermm:

(and, yes, I am often critical of Microsoft's policy of sitting on issues until they become public, but I see nothing here to complain about)

It's not stupid it's very smart, on top of good publicity it helps them understand their security flaws better, hackers are aware of the exploits anyways going to help Microsoft isnt going to make htme magically discover some new hole or something. I'd liek to see all hte big software companies to take their example and do soemthing similar then it would benefit everyone.

black_death said,
...
I'd liek to see all hte big software companies to take their example and do soemthing similar then it would benefit everyone.
It would be great! Maybe some software group can release the source code for their OS and all components, subject them to constant peer review, and even auditing by third parties, such as Coverity and university students studying programming.

Didn't the last one of these end in disaster when one of the "guests" hacked a fully patched laptop within like 5mins?