Microsoft is UK's top consumer brand

Microsoft has regained its spot as the strongest "superbrand" in the UK, knocking last year's number one Google into third place. The ranking comes from a list of Britain's top 500 brands and is compiled from a survey of experts and ordinary consumers.

The list is published by Superbrands UK and is based on research and polling by the Centre for Brand Analysis. Rankings are determined from a shortlist compiled from around 1,400 brands by "the independent and voluntary Expert Council" and then voted on by a "nationally representative sample of more than 2,100 British consumers aged 18 and above." The judging is based upon the quality of the brand and its products or services, the reliability of the brand to deliver and maintain standards, and the distinction of the brand from its competitors.

After the results are compiled, the top 500 companies make up the list of superbrands, with a superbrand being defined as: "A Superbrand has established the finest reputation in its field. It offers customers significant emotional and/or tangible advantages over its competitors, which (consciously or sub-consciously) customers want and recognise." According to the BBC this is the 12th year that the annual survey has been conducted and this year shows any major effects of the current economic downturn on consumers' perceptions.

Other notable technology related entries in the list include Apple at number 9, Nintendo at 20, Sony at 22 and the PlayStation brand at 42. Nokia, Sky, IBM, Dell, Hewlett-Packard, Panasonic, Intel and BT were also in the top 100. You can view the entire 500 for yourself in this PDF file.

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22 Comments

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koppit said,
rolex at number 2? honestly? does rolex do more for people than google?

Is it surprising when the sample size is two thousand people? Another highly questionable survey.

I've pre-ordered mine, I kinda hope Microsoft get the message that a lot more people will actually buy a copy when it's reasonably priced, and make it a permanent change.

... What, I can dream can't I?

Can people stop referring to the UK and Britain as the same?

In case you don't know......

Britain = England, Scotland and Wales.
UK = Britain and N.Ireland.

I'm referring to the first paragraph of this news thread.

Having the UK and Britain in the same news story makes it contradictory because one refers to 4 countries and the other refers to only 3 countries.

As far as this news goes I'm not really surprised. MS have redeemed themselves with Windows 7 after the Vista fiasco.

lee26 said,
Can people stop referring to the UK and Britain as the same?

In case you don't know......

Britain = England, Scotland and Wales.
UK = Britain and N.Ireland.

I'm referring to the first paragraph of this news thread.

Having the UK and Britain in the same news story makes it contradictory because one refers to 4 countries and the other refers to only 3 countries.

As far as this news goes I'm not really surprised. MS have redeemed themselves with Windows 7 after the Vista fiasco.

Well Britain is actually a term that can refer to a number of countries in the English language and does not necessarily mean is part of England, Scotland and Wales. Britain can actually be referred to as England itself and is a correct use of the word. Moreover, who really cares? I mean why do people waste their time being pedantic on grammar within Neowin news posts, particularly when Andrew's post is particularly well written.

Well Britain is actually a term that can refer to a number of countries in the English language and does not necessarily mean is part of England, Scotland and Wales. Britain can actually be referred to as England itself and is a correct use of the word. Moreover, who really cares? I mean why do people waste their time being pedantic on grammar within Neowin news posts, particularly when Andrew's post is particularly well written.


While I understand to a degree what you are saying the fact remains that the UK and Britain are not the same.

You can go to any part of England, Scotland or Wales and say you're in Britain but you can't say the same if you were in N.Ireland. That would be geographically incorrect. It would be like me going to Canada and saying I'm in the US.

Anyways I was just making a valid point. Lets not turn this into a full decussion and ruin the thread.

lee26 said,
Can people stop referring to the UK and Britain as the same?

In case you don't know......

Britain = England, Scotland and Wales.
UK = Britain and N.Ireland.

I'm referring to the first paragraph of this news thread.

Having the UK and Britain in the same news story makes it contradictory because one refers to 4 countries and the other refers to only 3 countries.

Just because the 2 terms have different meanings, doesn't make it contradictory. It's very possible that everything in this article is technically true as it was reported, even with the 2 different terms.

It says they didn't include N. Ireland in the sample. But they're saying it gives a representation of all the UK. So maybe they're just assuming that including N. Ireland wouldn't change the results.

It's not contradictory at all.

liberatus_sum said,
One of the most hated companies(brands) in the uk and the world?

By people who don't understand them, don't understand the benefits many of their products bring and just hate them because they are "Microsoft"; with no valid reasons?

Calum said,
By people who don't understand them, don't understand the benefits many of their products bring and just hate them because they are "Microsoft"; with no valid reasons?

Benefits... made it easy for stupid people to use a computer? Microsoft did nothing other companies weren't already doing.

What a load of horsesh--. I'm no Microsoft fanboy, but anyone could easily see that Microsoft has contributed a lot to the industry. If you're anti-Microsoft, fine. I have certain companies I tend to avoid as well. Still, there's no reason to spout bullsh-- at every corner.