Microsoft: It will be easier to make Xbox One games compared to Xbox 360

On Wednesday, Microsoft confirmed that it will allow for game developers to release their own titles on the Xbox One game console without the need for a third party publisher. Microsoft also confirmed in their statement that "every Xbox One can be used for development." Now more details are being revealed on how that will work, along with information about how development for the Xbox One should be easier than making games for the current Xbox 360.

In an article on OXM, Xbox's director of development Boyd Multerer states that while there are hardware development kits for the Xbox One, they have the same hardware specs as the Xbox One. He added, "It's just which keys and which certificates are on it, allowing it to see which version of the [Application Programming Interface] is in production." That would seem to suggest that Xbox One retail units could be quickly turned into dev kits with a simple change in their software keys and certificates, as previous rumors suggested.

Beyond that issue, Microsoft also contends that making games for the Xbox One overall will be much easier that making those games for the Xbox 360. One of the changes does away with the different walled environments that developers had to switch between for creating their games, testing them and then finally publishing them.

Xbox Live's principal program manager Chad Gibson states, "In the new Xbox, it's all production. So the way a developer uses and uses all the new Xbox's capabilities is all just in production. We have a bunch of mechanisms to manage, you know, IP protection and things like that."

Gibson says there's a lot more automation of practices for Xbox One development and less use of propriety tools compared to the Xbox 360. He states, "In the previous Xbox, we had things like the proprietary security protocol, we had a much more locked-down way for applications or games to call services provided by the actual game developers, and all that stuff is a lot easier now."

Microsoft should reveal more about their self-publishing plans for games in a month, when it makes some new Xbox One announcements at the Gamescom event in Germany.

Source: OXM | Image via Microsoft

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Xbox's director of development Boyd Multerer states that while there are hardware development kits for the Xbox One, they have the same hardware specs as the Xbox 360.

So you can play Xbox 360 games on the Xbox One devkits?

Oooh. That'll make developers very happy. Dev Kits are expensive. LOL I wonder what you'll have to do to Dev Kit your XBox One... LOL

Not really. If you've ever developed for other platforms and/or toolchains you'd know that MS behind these days. It was many years ago MS had the advantage compared to the competition; but those days are over.

Blom said,
Not really. If you've ever developed for other platforms and/or toolchains you'd know that MS behind these days. It was many years ago MS had the advantage compared to the competition; but those days are over.

Wut? What can outclass Visual Studio, even the most devoted netbeans, aptana, or any other IDE user has respect for Visual Studio and wish their javabased IDE's had the functionality and smoothness VS offers for their preferred programming language.

Microsoft are being extremely vague with details as usual. The thing is though while the retail Xbox One can be "used for development" such as debugging and running unsigned code. It will not actually replace the development kit.

Being able to run unsigned code like a debug machine isn't the same as a dev kit, which comes with many development tools you can't run on retail machines.

Apparently Indie devs on the Xbox One are 2nd class citizens. Rightly or wrongly. So their converted XB1 is a $500 dev kit but it's more restricted app development rather than full fledged dev kits.

"Microsoft should reveal more about their self-publishing plans for games in a month, when it makes some new Xbox One announcements at the Gamescom event in Germany."

Don't let something like reading the article stop the hate train now.

This just in, Microsoft offers free miracle treatment to cure cancer!

MindTrickz: "Oh, so I guess people who don't have cancer yet are second class citizens. Why not make a vaccine, Microsoft? Do we have to get cancer before you care about us?"

Easier to make, harder to sell. I guess next gen has tradeoffs. Hope that doesn't leak somehow and allow anyone to turn their unit into a dev kit.

PS4 being based on the same x86 architecture should make it similarly easy to program for.

I think the concept is less about the x86 and more about reducing the time needed to jump through hoops. If I have to fight my IDE, QA, and deployment, it's going to take a whole hell of alot longer to push code. Microsoft is hoping that by making the development process easier that it will help push amount of content.

virtualmadden said,
I think the concept is less about the x86 and more about reducing the time needed to jump through hoops. If I have to fight my IDE, QA, and deployment, it's going to take a whole hell of alot longer to push code. Microsoft is hoping that by making the development process easier that it will help push amount of content.

I welcome them trying to simplify the process. Will be interesting to see what the cost will be to get access and if things like MSDN membership covers it this time around.

Pay for the dev center license, get your cert downloaded to the Xbox One, done. I bet it's that simple as far as turning it from a retail unit into a dev unit. It's the same process on Windows Phones as well.