Microsoft launches child-friendly version of IE9

Microsoft has joined forces with the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) once again to launch a new version of Internet Explorer 9 (IE9), which includes various amount of features to help children stay safe when browsing the Internet.

The web browser is available to download from Microsoft's dedicated website and offers a new default homepage offering advice on how to stay safe on the web, along with pre-assigned bookmarks and multiple pieces of safety information from the CEOP. This means that your child can be equipped with a web browser without any inappropriate intrusions or exploitation risks.

Gabby Hegerty, Internet Explorer Lead in the UK had this to say about the initiative:

At Microsoft we always want to provide our customers with the tools to enjoy the web safely and securely. The internet has become a central part of everyday life for adults and children, from learning and communicating to working and playing online,

Hergerty added: "It is important we make the appropriate safety information available and build in features to our software which provide families with peace of mind online."

The customized version of IE9 has been released to mark Safer Internet Day, which takes place today (7 February). The annual event is organized by InSafe, who aims to educate web users about online security concerns and workarounds.

InSafe released their own statement to mark the occasion:

Whether you are 5, 40 or 75 years old, whether you use the internet once a month or several times a day - each person has something different to bring to the table that can help shape our online experiences and our understanding of online competences and safety. We all have a role to play in ensuring that every child is safe online.

Microsoft has previously released a version of Internet Explorer 8 that was designed in conjunction with the CEOP also, so it is good to see Microsoft following its actions and beliefs on online security.

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15 Comments

My kids are going to have something like this, its called being a parent, I am responsible for keeping my child safe online (assuming i had one).

TheLegendOfMart said,
My kids are going to have something like this, its called being a parent, I am responsible for keeping my child safe online (assuming i had one).

Unfortunately, most parents anymore it seems are just not that involved... It's sad really... At least someone is attempting to fill the shoes of parents that are unwilling or incapable of doing so themselves...

TheLegendOfMart said,
My kids are going to have something like this, its called being a parent, I am responsible for keeping my child safe online (assuming i had one).

From the official page, I don't think this is going to have any effect on kids.
If they had safe behavior before, they will continue.
If they had """unsafe""" (three pairs of quotes there...) behavior, they will continue.

This is not a browser with included "parental control", or which will magically protect kids - it's just IE9, about as customized as any of these "Download IE9 optimized for..." builds. (not that I'd recommend parental control)

Edited by Aethec, Feb 7 2012, 8:43pm :

Should be part of IE to being with and an option that parents can set, lock, customise further through Windows Family settings if that exists.

oceanmotion said,
Should be part of IE to being with and an option that parents can set, lock, customise further through Windows Family settings if that exists.

true should be a feature rather than a separate download.

still1 said,

true should be a feature rather than a separate download.
AFAIK it's already built in. The news is just talking about a tool that configure IE for you automatically.

Anthonyd said,
AFAIK it's already built in. The news is just talking about a tool that configure IE for you automatically.
What is already built in? Do you mean Parental Control?

It would have been useful if the article explained what changes have been made to this version of IE and how it differs from the standard version.

jakem1 said,
It would have been useful if the article explained what changes have been made to this version of IE and how it differs from the standard version.

Yeah, only the kids in the UK should be safe! LOL

Why not just retool MSN Explorer as their kid browser -- aka slap a new logo over the butterfly with a cartoony IE icon that dances when the page loads.

Instead of a special version, why not make this part of Windows' parental controls? Hope they include it as an IE10 feature.

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