Microsoft launches new website to help users pick a "green" PC

While Microsoft may be moving its business model to become a devices and services company, there's no doubt that its bread and butter is the old fashioned PC. Buying new hardware can still be a hard task for both individuals and businesses, and it's made even more difficult when environmental factors such as power use and more are factored into the mix.

Today, Microsoft announced the launch of a new website designed to help people with buying a PC that has less of an impact on the environment. It's called the Greener IT Challenge, and it offers both training and tests, along with a video, to not only help people pick a "green" PC but also to properly dispose of the hardware when the PC's life is over.

In a post on Microsoft's Green Blog, the company says it tries to be environmentally conscious when it comes to its own PCs. It states:

In fiscal year 2013, Microsoft recycled over 37,000 PC’s. We have policies in place on buying greener PCs, configuring them to use the power-saving features in the Windows operating system and disposing of old machines properly so they don’t end up in landfills. In 2012, we shared a paper outlining Microsoft’s specific energy saving practices that help ensure Microsoft IT reduces the environmental impact of PCs used at the company and as a result of these practices lowered energy consumption by 32 percent, lowered the company’s CO2 emissions and saved money.

Microsoft also refurbishes many of its older PCs which are then donated to others who might be in need of computers, while also keeping them out of landfills.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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19 Comments

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Well solar panels produce more energy then they use to ship and manufacture in 2 years and they can last 20 years , electric cars have a much longer payback time.

But in your case 8 years is fine I was just saying you got to factor those things in.

DrakeN2k said,
best way to be green is to keep your old pc .

Gotta disagree. I've recently retired an 8-year old Athlon XP-based machine that could warm up a whole room in a few minutes and consistently drew at least 150W when basically idling. I have newer machines that do better even under full load.

You got to factoring disposal, transport and manufacture of your new pc. compared to energy emissions of the use of the PC. Your new pc will have a payback period but will it be paid back time you by another pc?

DrakeN2k said,
You got to factoring disposal, transport and manufacture of your new pc. compared to energy emissions of the use of the PC. Your new pc will have a payback period but will it be paid back time you by another pc?

As I mentioned, the computer I replaced was 8 years old. How many people still use a computer that old as their 'daily driver'? How much longer should I keep using it for by your calculations?

Besides, it's not just the power used by the computer over the course of its 8-year life--I can guarantee I've been running the AC way more often than otherwise needed because of the heat it's been generating.

Anyway...if you're gonna bring up that manufacturing / transportation / disposal argument, then you've gotta admit, solar panels and electric cars quickly lose their appeal.

CSharp. said,
That website could be a whole lot 'greener' if it didn't require Adobe's Flash Player...
i'm surprised the website uses flash and not silverlight lol

There's no such thing as a "green" pc. There's more energy efficient ones, but green implies it is nature friendly (fast decomp time, made with recycled materials, and no toxic materials).