Microsoft launches Windows Server 2012 R2 for Embedded Systems

In mid-October, Microsoft announced the launch of Windows Embedded 8.1 Industry based largely on the improvements that were made to Windows 8.1. Today, the company said that it has made Windows Server 2012 R2 for Embedded Systems available for general use, which again is using much of the code base behind the new Windows Server 2012 R2.

In a blog post, Partha Srinivasan, the product manager for Microsoft's Windows Embedded Server and SQL Products, said that their new server software offers enterprise and OEM customers better virtualization capabilities as well as other improvements. He stated:

The time it takes to complete a live migration has been cut in half. We’ve increased data transfer rates to 10 gigabits per second, greatly enhancing speed. We’ve also added support for USB access in guest VMs, making it easier to perform software deployment and file management.

These changes and improvements, as well as others, will allow for businesses to run small servers in locations that don't have a lot of space. Srinivasan stated that an example of this kind of situation is Lufthansa Systems, which used Windows Server 2012 R2 for Embedded Systems to create an application that can handle in-flight entertainment on their airplanes.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft to offer Office 365 for free to 4 million students in Sao Paulo, Brazil

Next Story

Google Glass receives a minor makeover, starts shipping to developers

4 Comments

The only purpose that I can see this serving is for running IIS+ASP.NET on an embedded system. I'd be nice if Microsoft would create a version of Windows Server based on MinWin to run IIS + ASP.NET not only for embedded systems but also as a free version to run on regular servers.

In other words, a free HTML/Web server. Such a product would have not merely screams of *antitrust* but HOWLs of it - it's why Hyper-V Server doesn't offer a GUI. (Hyper-V Server *is* Windows Server every other way - it's based on the same code, takes the same updates, etc. - it's also free, period.) Actually, I can think of a use for an embedded server (be it Windows, Linux, what-have-you) - a distributed/embedded computing network in aircraft, ships, etc. (Look at a commercial aircraft - be it Boeing, Airbus, even Bombardier - do you realize exactly how many computers are needed merely for the avionics? That is one use for Windows for Industry, including 8.1/2012R2, today. Same applies to ships, including, if not especially, cruise ships - just as it has LONG applied to military vessels, including destroyers, frigates, etc.)

PGHammer said,
In other words, a free HTML/Web server. Such a product would have not merely screams of *antitrust* but HOWLs of it - it's why Hyper-V Server doesn't offer a GUI. (Hyper-V Server *is* Windows Server every other way - it's based on the same code, takes the same updates, etc. - it's also free, period.) Actually, I can think of a use for an embedded server (be it Windows, Linux, what-have-you) - a distributed/embedded computing network in aircraft, ships, etc. (Look at a commercial aircraft - be it Boeing, Airbus, even Bombardier - do you realize exactly how many computers are needed merely for the avionics? That is one use for Windows for Industry, including 8.1/2012R2, today. Same applies to ships, including, if not especially, cruise ships - just as it has LONG applied to military vessels, including destroyers, frigates, etc.)

Yes, I'm well aware of Hyper-V Server being free, as I run it on my home server. I even looked into whether or not IIS could be installed on it and administered remotely with Server Manager. I always thought the limitation was an excuse to sell Windows Server rather than there being an anti-trust issue if they were to allow it, but I suppose the anti-trust issue is as valid as any.

Last year I had the privilege of touring one of the brand spanking-new Coast Guard National Security Cutters, and I saw that they were running Windows Server onboard--Windows Server 2003 to be exact. LOL. Windows Server 2003 is an excellent OS, but it's on the verge of EOL just like XP is.

Edited by TMYW, Nov 2 2013, 2:44pm :

Which is why the same contractor is looking at Windows Server 2012 Embedded (as is the rest of the military, and their contractors). Distributed computing began in the military simply because of the number of different things that computers have long done - you start linking the various embedded computers together, you get networks (albeit embedded ones, simply so the various embedded computers can talk to one another) - and, naturally, Windows NT made a great fit, being all about networking from the get-go. The biggest advantage Linux distributions have had historically in the HTML/Web server space is their lack of cost - and it is something that Microsoft, also for the longest time, has NOT been permitted to horn in on (legal strictures, especially in Europe) - it is why IIS (which has remained an option in the non-server flavors of Windows, including Windows 8, by the way) is so hobbled.

Commenting is disabled on this article.