Microsoft: "Making money is important for developers"

Developers and their creativity is what allows consumers to utilize their technology in new and innovative ways. But, to be able to do this, developers need cash and sometimes, lots of it.

At an Imagine Cup press conference, Walid Abu-Hadba, Corporate Vice President of Developer & Platform Evangelism Group, took the stage to talk about fostering developer communities to create innovative and self-sustaining applications to help provide developers the cash that they need to continue with their work.

In an honest, but fair statement, he assessed that developers create applications to make money. When developers can make money, this allows them to drive their social agenda. You can see a bit more of the statement in the video of Walid above.

For developers, an idea is only as good as the implementation. While there are certainly nightly and weekend warriors, those who can dedicate all of their resources to one project have a better chance at creating a well-received application than those developers who have split agendas. 

The press conference was part of the kick-off for Imagine Cup 2012 where Microsoft and students from around the world will be showcasing their game-changing products for everyone to see. 

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25 Comments

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oh psh, the open source movement taught me no one needs to make money... all software should be free and all coders should work for free!!!!!

Also in the news: Hungry people need to eat; to get somewhere, you need to move; and to wash yourself, you need soap. More at 11.

sexypepperoni said,
Developers need money and that is the main reason no one develops for Windows Phone 7.

Developers need money and that is the main reason no one develops for OSX.

nohone said,

Developers need money and that is the main reason no one develops for OSX.

Every piece of mainstream software supports Windows and OS X thesedays -.^

sexypepperoni said,

Joke is on you, most apps are available in OSX too.

So you are denying that there are far, far more apps available for Windows than there are for OSX?

Then sort out your F******* S**** App Hub then (3 weeks and counting)

"Thank you for contacting Windows Phone App Hub Developer Support.

This is a known indexing issue which our engineers are actively working to resolve. I'll ensure your complaint regarding this is logged with the appropriate party. We know this isn't ideal, and have made this issue a high priority as it's also affecting some other developers. I will provide an update once a fix has been implemented.

I sincerely apologize for the negative impact this may have. Your patience and cooperation is very much appreciated."

rfirth said,
What are you talking about?

I think he is referring to the time it takes to submit an app and have it published. This has been my only gripe with the platform very inconsistent, some times it will take a matter of days, other times it will take over a month to get approved.

Interesting. The longest I've had to wait was 5 days... about 4 days to get approved, and another whole day for it to get published.

rfirth said,
Interesting. The longest I've had to wait was 5 days... about 4 days to get approved, and another whole day for it to get published.

The app was approved and published but you cannot see it in the marketplace. Constant emails and 3 weeks later you still cannot search for it in the Marketplace. Now I appreciate sometimes things go wrong but 3 weeks - really and still no eta.

Thankfully it is a personal app but had similar (not as long) problems with client apps. Not had a single app gone through smoothly yet and support seems very poor.

Minimoose said,

It does for some, everyone has different reasons for what they do.

Money is not capable of motivating innovation whether you or anybody wants it to or not.

gregalto said,
Makes sense, need cash to live.

Yeah, he is just stating the obvious. If we developers have the finances to support our projects, we can do the work more effectively. It doesn't necessarily mean that it fosters innovation.