Microsoft may offer OneDrive cloud storage for Xbox Music users

Microsoft's Xbox Music service allows users to stream songs to various devices with a paid subscription, but it's limited to the tracks that the company has in its library. Now there's a rumor that Microsoft is working to allow users to upload songs they already own to OneDrive so they can be played later on Xbox Music.

LiveSino reports they have found references to such a storage locker service in OneDrive's source code. Here's the description they found:

Meet your OneDrive Music folder. Upload your music files to this folder, so that you can play them via Xbox Music from any of your devices. You can also add files to this folder using the OneDrive app for your computer.

While the code may currently exist in OneDrive, it's not yet live to the general public and there's no word on when Microsoft will turn on this feature. This certainly would be a huge help for heavy Xbox Music users who also own their own digital tracks or who want to transfer music from their legally purchased CDs to the cloud. Similar cloud storage features are already available for Amazon's Cloud Player and Google Play Music.

Source: LiveSino via The Verge

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This would be awesome as I have moved from android to Windows Phone so it would be like having Google Music again. Whereas right now i have to use a third party app to get into my google music and none of them really work all that well.

You can upload 12000 songs to google play music and play it back anywhere, and it does not take up space from your google drive storage.

Yeah, in fact I've found a lot of relatively mainstream stuff isn't available ("The Fixx" from the 80s and 90s, only ONE of their many albums is available). It can be pretty frustrating.

pmbAustin said,
You can already match your local music to get it to the cloud. However, it's not a DIRECT comparison to iTunes Match.

Well, I know that; I've used/paid for Xbox music before. But it's still not exactly like iTunes Match; that was my point.

Here's the difference. With iTunes Match, you're basically paying a yearly subscription for the service to scan your non-iTunes purchased music and allows you to download them on your other devices, in addition to having the option to replace your low quality files with 256 kbps ACC files. You need to maintain a subscription to continue to access matched music on your devices, but any downloaded ACCs are yours to keep.

Everything in Xbox Music is free, except unlimited ad-free streaming and downloading. The scan and match I free and you can immediately begin streaming on your other devices, in addition to adding whatever you want from the music store to your collection.

"May"? This is a required feature that MUST be implemented, and the sooner the better. It's one of many MAJOR missing pieces to the Xbox Music Story... things like gapless playback, proper handing of multi-disc CDs, and about a dozen other features that USED to exist in the old Zune product but are shockingly missing from Xbox Music (music achievements, rating systems, etc.). I mean, the phone app can't even sort albums by artist... it just lists all albums in alphabetical order. Who wants to view them THAT way?

I'm glad to see they're pushing rapid updates (every two weeks), but they have a LONG way to go before it's even usable, let alone as good as or better than 1) what they had before in Zune, and 2) what the competition already provides.

Anyway, glad to see this feature is finally being implemented. Xbox Music "match" misses a shocking number of my CDs.

I agree that the app (for both PC & Phone) needs some work. For the PC, it needs to have as much functionality as WMP & Zune--the best features of each. In other words, they need to create a DESKTOP version of the app, because 1.5 billion of us are still using the desktop.

Aergan said,
Shame that this wasn't thought of sooner

Given how lawyer happy the music industry is, it was probably thought of long ago, but needed legal groundwork done first. Tech only moves as fast as the lawyers in some cases.

Chikairo said,

Given how lawyer happy the music industry is, it was probably thought of long ago, but needed legal groundwork done first. Tech only moves as fast as the lawyers in some cases.

I'm sure they could have just asked Amazon. They have been offering this via their Amazon Cloud Player for years now...

cybersaurusrex said,
Amazon has nothing to do with it. It has to do with working out contracts with each music company (as someone else pointed out).

Of course the contracts are key, but once a competitor is doing it then you have an easier argument getting those contracts (assuming Amazon didn't lock them into an exclusivity agreement for some duration of time).

LogicalApex said,

Of course the contracts are key, but once a competitor is doing it then you have an easier argument getting those contracts (assuming Amazon didn't lock them into an exclusivity agreement for some duration of time).

One does have to wonder about pricing, too. Was Amazon willing to pay more? And is Amazon in a better position to negotiate? I think they are - they're a massive music seller, unlike MIcrosoft.

LogicalApex said,

I'm sure they could have just asked Amazon. They have been offering this via their Amazon Cloud Player for years now...

Xbox Music =/= Amazon Cloud Player. Microsoft offers an unlimited streaming music service, in addition to a limited ad-supported model but still on-demand streaming, in addition to scanning and matching your songs with the service so they can be streamed or downloaded (with subscription) on your other devices. I'm sure the negotiations are a bit easier for Amazon.