Microsoft names former HP exec as new leader of marketing for Windows

Microsoft has a new marketing leader for Windows, Tony Prophet, who previously worked at one of the company's biggest OEM partners, HP. Prophet will replace Thom Gruhler in that role, who will stat with the company in a new position with its Applications and Services group.

The news, as first reported by ZDNet, includes a statement from Microsoft, which says, "Tony will focus on growing the Windows ecosystem and enabling our partners to be more successful building on Windows." Prophet was HP's Senior Vice President of Operations for Printing and Personal Systems. He will officially start working at his new gig in early May and will report to Chris Capossela, Microsoft's Chief Marketing Officer.

The hiring of Prophet is an interesting one as he comes from HP, which remains one of Microsoft's largest OEM partners. He will likely bring that experience in working with Microsoft on selling Windows-based hardware in his new position. He might bring a new perspective that Microsoft needs as it still struggles to sell Windows 8.1-based PCs to consumers.

Source: ZDNet | Image via HP

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17 Comments

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Uh-oh. Expect the 1+ GB printer driver bundles to become part of Windows.

(For those who don't understand where I'm coming from: Those useless apps are all driven by sales/marketing--they're only there to get you to use HP's services and buy more HP crap...the drivers themselves are usually well under 50MB)

Don't have a good feeling about this. He will be out within 2 years I predict, I am not a prophet though (no pun).

JHBrown said,
I say give the guy a chance. He could be the one that changes Microsoft's terrible marketing.

What terrible marketing?

I thought the Surface vs iPad ads where Siri talked were really good. Samsung even adopted the model and poked fun of Siri also.

TheGhostPhantom said,

What terrible marketing?

I thought the Surface vs iPad ads where Siri talked were really good. Samsung even adopted the model and poked fun of Siri also.

It is well known, even on Neowin that Microsoft does not market their products well. They have missed many opportunities to reach the public effectively. You are referring to something more recent. I'm speaking in general.

JHBrown said,
I say give the guy a chance. He could be the one that changes Microsoft's terrible marketing.

Hopefully so. Microsoft's marketing has improved over time (no more "Microsoft Mouse XP Enterprise Edition R2" style names), but they've still got a way to go. Scroogled was an attrocious campaign, and the first Surface marketing campaign was pretty bad as well (we get it, Surface has a kickstand).

Wow what a name, we must listen to what Tony has to say :-)

Good luck to him as well, give the guy a chance, just because he's from HP doesn't mean much, it's not like HP is a disaster, at least not in its profitable businesses

This is big big mistake... Microsoft marketing is very bad, and HP marketing is very bad.

These companies have apparently forgotten how to hire smart people, at least at the management level.

What's wrong with Microsoft's marketing? They're have been really great lately. The problem is, there isn't enough of them anymore. When Windows 7 came out, there were billboards, posters, advertising, etc. everywhere. Now, we barely see anything (at least here in Canada). They have great ads, they simply need to spend more money in bringing them to more consumer heavy places.

Not just HP marketing, but unless HP has vastly improved their printer and scanner driver support over the past four or five years, that definitely needs improvement. (Having to discard perfectly good hardware because HP chose to not supply Windows-7 drivers to "late XP purchased" devices is unacceptable.)

You have to wonder why Microsoft would chose someone from HP, when HP have been losing PC/Windows market share, and plagued with scandals to do with their marketing practices.

Why wouldn't they employ someone with the skills required? Hell, the bonus is, they now have a wealth of knowledge from the OEM side of things.