Microsoft offers 100GB of OneDrive storage for one year with 100 Bing Rewards points

Last week, Microsoft managed to give away one year of 100GB of storage for its OneDrive service to 100,000 people in the space of less than 30 minutes. Today, Microsoft is offering yet another way to get 100GB of OneDrive space but this time it will take a little more work (but not much more).

Microsoft has announced that people who sign up for the Bing Rewards program will be able to claim an offer of 100GB OneDrive storage for 12 months if they earn at least 100 points. As we have reported before, signing up for Bing Rewards is free and gives points to people who search on the Bing.com site. The rewards program was recently expanded to include access to Bing via iOS and Android devices.

Getting 100 Bing Rewards points won't take a long time (indeed, new members get 20 points just to sign up) and users who decide to take advantage of the offer will get access to a one year OneDrive subscription in return that would normally be priced at $50. Once the points are redeemed, a special code is emailed which must be used by June 30th.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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39 Comments

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i_was_here said,
Can you redeem this only once or can you redeem multiple times?

I'm trying that right now.

With many of these codes they are giving out, you can use multiple and it will extend it by another year. I'm trying to find out if adding 2 codes gives you 200GB for a year, or 100GB for 2 years. It's probably for 2 years.

But the rules...
"Limit of one offer code per Microsoft account - codes cannot be combined."

i_was_here said,
Can you redeem this only once or can you redeem multiple times?

They automatically cancel your second order if you try to buy two with the same Bing rewards account.

I'm not sure what happens if you have 2 Bing rewards accounts, but apply both codes to your main account. But the 100GB you buy shows up as an Enthusiast Bonus in OneDrive. It probably would extend your time by another year for each code.

Well, if the offer is always there, I don't mind. I use Bing by default, and its paid for quite a bit for me from my weekly coffee to Amazon purchases. Always nice to have a couple of bucks from just using the internet.

Yay, another free trial that you have to work to get.

I hope Microsoft figures out how to give away real prizes soon.

Dropbox did and that is why I use them, 54GB free for a lifetime.

Not a free trial. The annual rate for 100GB of extra space is $50. This is just using Bing reward points for a one year voucher of that extra storage.

Dropbox only gave me like 2 gigs and makes me have to "do stuff" to get any more. SkyDrive started me with 25 and they give me extra storage codes for doing nothing at all really. I'd imagine that they would continue to give me at least 20 extra free gigs every year, even if they're temporary.

This feature isn't available yet in your country or region. So one facepalm for free storage but for one year, and second facepalm for restricted areas!

If MS make this permanent, they can really drive traffic to Bing and OneDrive. I would even say to increase the point value to 500 pts and redeem it at the end of the year to keep your 100GB space.

Why is this a big deal? Its just temp storage after of which, you will need to pay for. Good marketing as they get you used to the extra space.

This question has been asked and answered on every single SkyDrive/OneDrive post. The data remains, you can download it or delete it.

techbeck said,
Agreed.

What happens after the year and this expires? Does your data get removed eventually?

Nope, as people have pointed out a 1000 times on Neowin, if you are over the limit, you just can no longer add content. So your content is PERMANENTLY stored and protected. Ok?

You also are assuming that Microsoft won't continue to offer future deals on storage, yet they have continued to offer deal after deal each year now.

Lord Method Man said,
No, your data stays there but you won't be allowed to upload anything unless you buy more storage or delete stuff.

Thanks. Wasnt sure and I didnt notice the posts in other threads answering this.

corrosive23 said,

No one gives a #### about your files.

Except for all the people who are looking to steal info from anyone and everyone. Which there are many.

Except for all the people who are looking to steal info from anyone and everyone. Which there are many.

The point is that those concerned with data security already implement countermeasures locally, and wouldn't trust a third party's encryption integrity anyway, nor would they trust any promises made by said third party about not peeking at files.

Antoine Prince said,
another 100 I am afraid to use because they could be going thru my files.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/per...xchange-online-service.aspx

http://www.microsoft.com/online/legal/v2/?docid=24

FYI, if anybody ever proved that MS's customers were having their data "browsed" by people that work there... the company would be destroyed in their online division that they are pumping so much capital (cash/intellectual) into right now.

If you think they are risking all that investment to see your vacation photos... you're drunk.

techbeck said,

Except for all the people who are looking to steal info from anyone and everyone. Which there are many.

If you can break the OneDrive encryption, go for it. This isn't GDocs/GDrive.

Even a Microsoft employee would need to break 256bit encryption if they wanted to look through files. With GDrive users on the other hand, any Google engineer can read your files without any protections.

techbeck said,

Except for all the people who are looking to steal info from anyone and everyone. Which there are many.

Well it depends on what you put on your OneDrive (or any other file storage). If it's vacation pictures, no big deal. If you're putting your tax statements and social security number or whatever, you could encrypt it locally before uploading just to be safe. As far as hackers getting in to your OneDrive, it would have to be through phishing, keylogging, etc.

Enron said,

Well it depends on what you put on your OneDrive (or any other file storage). If it's vacation pictures, no big deal. If you're putting your tax statements and social security number or whatever, you could encrypt it locally before uploading just to be safe. As far as hackers getting in to your OneDrive, it would have to be through phishing, keylogging, etc.

Exactly...

Even if someone doesn't trust Microsoft or the network between themselves and the servers, there are ample encryption technologies to store sensitive content that can be uploaded to SkyDrive.

With Windows itself, create an encrypted VHD in your SkyDrive folders, mount it and put sensitive documents inside it. This adds another layer of encryption for transmission and along with Microsoft server encryption is now three layers of hard encryption.


Side Note:
Although consumer 'cloud' storage is fairly new, IS/IT professionals have been using server side storage over the internet for over 20 years. There are ways to secure content and we haven't ever had a problem with compromised access of our data.

Google had begun encrypting their data a while ago. But this isnt about Google vs MS. Data is out there, people can get it. Whether it is hacking an account, or phishing for the info. I personally do not put anything online I dont want others to see. It stays on my own private network and on a machine I only connect to the internet if/when I need to. Yea, my data has never been compromised either....but I am not going to put myself in a position to have it compromised either.

techbeck said,
Google had begun encrypting their data a while ago. But this isnt about Google vs MS. Data is out there, people can get it. Whether it is hacking an account, or phishing for the info. I personally do not put anything online I dont want others to see. It stays on my own private network and on a machine I only connect to the internet if/when I need to. Yea, my data has never been compromised either....but I am not going to put myself in a position to have it compromised either.

Even if you do all that, your data is still out there. Credit card transactions, your bank accounts, social security number, your favorite color, where you are and what you had to eat last night. It's all being stored in a database somewhere and you have no control over that.

Enron said,

Even if you do all that, your data is still out there. Credit card transactions, your bank accounts, social security number, your favorite color, where you are and what you had to eat last night. It's all being stored in a database somewhere and you have no control over that.

True, but I know people who put log on info to sites online, store files related to financial data and many other things in the cloud. And what happens if your info is stolen from one of the cloud services? Is there any compensation? At least I know that if money is stolen from my bank account, or if someone steals my CC info, I will be compensated for the loss.

So I guess yes, a little of my info is out there already but what I can keep in my own private network, I do.

techbeck said,
Google had begun encrypting their data a while ago. But this isnt about Google vs MS. Data is out there, people can get it. Whether it is hacking an account, or phishing for the info. I personally do not put anything online I dont want others to see. It stays on my own private network and on a machine I only connect to the internet if/when I need to. Yea, my data has never been compromised either....but I am not going to put myself in a position to have it compromised either.

They have always encrypted their data at the media level, but they have not encrypted their data from their own employees. Unless I missed a big story, this has not changed, as just a few months ago Google was once again defending their employees need to query and view user content. (Which they have defended many times in the past, even when they had to fire a child molester that was viewing teenager content.)

techbeck said,

True, but I know people who put log on info to sites online, store files related to financial data and many other things in the cloud. And what happens if your info is stolen from one of the cloud services? Is there any compensation? At least I know that if money is stolen from my bank account, or if someone steals my CC info, I will be compensated for the loss.

So I guess yes, a little of my info is out there already but what I can keep in my own private network, I do.

Then locally encrypt your content before storing on a cloud service. See my post above for a simple what to create a secure drive that can exist on OneDrive/DropBox/etc.

Mobius Enigma said,
Then locally encrypt your content before storing on a cloud service. See my post above for a simple what to create a secure drive that can exist on OneDrive/DropBox/etc.

I do locally encrypt my data. I am still not putting it online. Call me paranoid but that is just how I deal with my sensitive data. I dont care if it is OneDrive, Dropbox, or Google Drive. Not going to happen. And there is really no reason why this data needs to be online anyway. Pictures, drivers, procedures, and anything else non sensitive...fine.

techbeck said,

I do locally encrypt my data. I am still not putting it online. Call me paranoid but that is just how I deal with my sensitive data. I dont care if it is OneDrive, Dropbox, or Google Drive. Not going to happen. And there is really no reason why this data needs to be online anyway. Pictures, drivers, procedures, and anything else non sensitive...fine.

If you don't have need to unified access to information or data, then don't.

However, if you use an encrypted hard drive (VHD) or other encryption technology, there is NO WAY anyone can ever open it, no matter where it is stored.

As I said, being a person in IS/IT for a long time, remote storage and online access to information has been around and in common use for most of us for a long time.

I literally have top secret clearance documents when I worked with NASA and they are highly encrypted, but safely stored on OneDrive.

The trick is that people think that local storage is a lot safer than it really is. If I knew your address I could leach your 'secure' document just by you viewing them on your screen unless you live in a house lined with lead.

Online/cloud storage be just as secure as local storage and for many users actually forces them to use more security making them more secure than local storage.

I understand that not everyone needs online access to content. However, for many people being able to look up information from anywhere on any device is rather handy. I have 30 years of digital content and 20+ years of email that I can search and view instantly on anything from my phone to a 32gb tablet or any computer.

The whole prospect of the information age is having access to that information anywhere, which increases its value and saves time. If I had to physically go to a location to retrieve documents or emails on a client I would spend most of my life traveling.

It also helps that when you are talking to a friend or client about a 10 year old project, that you can flip to history or do a search and reference the documents, messages, email verbatim during the conversation.

Another thing that is often dismissed is the threshold of what is truly secure, and as long as you are human, you are the weakest link. Storing encrypted information locally or on a VHD on OneDrive cannot ever be accessed if you are dead; however, if you are alive, you can get a court order or be forced to give access to the contents. The local storage is also going to be easier to find.

For other readers there are highly secure ways to store information even on unsecure services like Dropbox or GDrive. And even if you have a distrust for Microsoft, the same additional safeguards can be taken for storing content on OneDrive.

Side Note:
There are far more extensive security options that even the basic ones I mention, you can use file based encryption, added with package based encryption added with a volume based encryption added with storing it on an encrypted service.

As a contrast of who secures what... For spying, the NSA hasn't found a way to access WP for reading contents or using the mics/cameras, and they also have not gained direct read access of Microsoft servers. The same is not true of iOS or Android and the same is not true of Google's servers.

Just remember this isn't forever, it'll expire so them giving out all this storage doesn't mean much. I hope the integration is better with music and video, maybe then i'll use my 28gb more.

George P said,
Just remember this isn't forever, it'll expire so them giving out all this storage doesn't mean much. I hope the integration is better with music and video, maybe then i'll use my 28gb more.
$50 value for 100 points is pretty nice. I have all of my files, work, pictures, videos in mine atm.