Microsoft: Office 365 had average of 99.965 percent uptime in last four quarters

When you have an online service like Office 365, its subscribers expect to use that service 24/7, 365 (no pun intended). However, there are always going to be times when something goes wrong, and even Office 365 has had periods of downtime. Today, Microsoft announced a new program that will offer uptime numbers on Office 365 to the public on an ongoing basis.

In a post on the Office blog, Microsoft states:

We measure availability as the number of minutes that the Office 365 service is available in a calendar month as a percentage of the total number of minutes in that month. We call this measure of availability the uptime number.

For the last four quarters, running from July 2012 to June 2013, Microsoft said its Office 365 uptime numbers for its business, education and government customers have been, in order, 99.98 percent, 99.97 percent, 99.94 percent and 99.97 percent. Those numbers include the availability of Microsoft's Exchange, SharePoint, Lync and Office Web Apps but don't include the users of the consumer oriented Office 365 Home Premium or users of Office 365 ProPlus.

The blog post also goes over some of the efforts Microsoft has made to keep Office 365 up and running as much as possible, including lots of redundancy at the hardware level. Microsoft states:

We build physical redundancy at the disk/card level within servers, the server level within a datacenter and the service level across geographically separate data centers to protect against failures. Each data center has facilities and power redundancy. We have multiple datacenters serving every region.

Microsoft also says that Office 365 servers are distributed so possible failures in one area don't affect the rest. The blog claims there is constant monitoring of the server hardware and software and a team of technicians are available at all times of the day and night to fix any issues. If a failure does happen, Microsoft states that it launches into a "thorough post-incident review" no matter how big or small the problem turns out to be.

Office 365 customers also get access to its Service Health Dashboard, shown above, that offers a constant look into the current uptime status of the service. Microsoft says, "This public disclosure of Office 365 uptime is evidence of our ongoing commitment to both Service Continuity and Transparency."

Source: Microsoft | Images via Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

GameStop to launch Xbox 360-to-Xbox One game upgrade program

Next Story

Patent suggests Microsoft to bring email flags to phone calls

24 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

The only place we get that is network and storage equipment and only if it's configured to be redundant. Any application level is basically impossible because the code is always changing and all it takes it one mistake.

Yeah, but they must have some sort of agreement because I have a basic Office 365 account and I have received a couple of free months for some downtime in the past year.

That's would be in the service level agreement (SLA) for business. If you have the small business one it's 99.9%. I don't think the consumer versions have any financially backed SLA although they may decide to issue credits for retention reasons.

Torolol said,
Office 365- (minus)

If my calculations are correct 99,965 equals 3,066 hours of downtime or 0,12775 days

So office 364,87225 it is!

3 hours of downtime on one work day would be irritating, during a night would not bother me. For a relatively new service I think it is an ok score, not exceptional.


edit: ah leap year: 3,0744 hours of downtime,, 0,1281 days
so office 365,8719, people got even more than expected


Impressive for what is essentially the first year of the service, even if it sort of existed before it was redone and is essentially a new service.

I guess that's why my corporation chose Google over MS.
We only believe in Carrier grade solutions, which for those of you who don't know, is 5 9s of uptime, aka 99.999% uptime.

deadonthefloor said,
I guess that's why my corporation chose Google over MS.
We only believe in Carrier grade solutions, which for those of you who don't know, is 5 9s of uptime, aka 99.999% uptime.

Then why did they choose google....

Microsoft issued credits when the service was down for just a couple of hours. They stand behind their service agreement.

deadonthefloor said,
I guess that's why my corporation chose Google over MS.
We only believe in Carrier grade solutions, which for those of you who don't know, is 5 9s of uptime, aka 99.999% uptime.

as far as I know no company does 99.999% . 99.965% is extremely good.

Raa said,
Compared to 100% uptime to my locally installed copy of Office...

Because your locally installed copy of Office is an Exchange Server, Sharepoint Server and Lync server which is what is being talked about in this article, so your comparison is totally valid.

Raa said,
Compared to 100% uptime to my locally installed copy of Office...

Office 365 is also local....

And a single computer crash or you rebooting the computer for a driver update and they beat your uptime anyway...

Douglas_C said,

Because your locally installed copy of Office is an Exchange Server, Sharepoint Server and Lync server which is what is being talked about in this article, so your comparison is totally valid.

I think this sums up microsofts naming and marketing department, they can make some of the best products out there, however it always gets pushed out badly by marketing leading usually to consumer confusion about what the product is.

Raa said,
Compared to 100% uptime to my locally installed copy of Office...

So you never installed any Windows Updates or had to reboot?

REM2000 said,

I think this sums up microsofts naming and marketing department, they can make some of the best products out there, however it always gets pushed out badly by marketing leading usually to consumer confusion about what the product is.

I have to agree on the naming. Not only do people not understand that Office 365 is also the local applications, there's also an "Office 365 Home Premium" that's a different product with a different support center.