Microsoft planning 'Windows Store' App Store for Windows 8

Microsoft is planning a Windows Store for Windows 8 according to documents leaked to the Internet on Monday.

The application store will allow users to discover and download trustworthy applications and have applications and their settings follow them on Windows 8. "Consumers get applications they want, that they can feel confident in, that they can use on any Windows 8 device" reads one of many slides detailing the new Windows Store.

Consumers will be able to search on the web or locally on a Windows 8 machine to access applications from the store. Microsoft also details plans for application developers to help reach millions of users. One of the goals is to ensure licensing and monetization for developers is flexible with a transparent on-boarding process.

It's clear that the 'Windows Store' will be a software service Microsoft provides and hosts fully in the cloud. The company will likely build the distribution model on Windows Azure to lure application developers.

Microsoft tried its hand at electronic software delivery with the Windows Marketplace. The software giant scaled back the platform in November 2008 when it announced that the digital locker would be shutdown in 2009. The digital locker and Windows Marketplace could be used to purchase and download third party software titles compatible with Microsoft Windows, and then use that purchased software on any computer the software license allows. Those wishing to purchase copies of Microsoft software are now directed to the Microsoft Store. Clearly Microsoft is ready to test the platform again with Windows 8.

 

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Dunno about others but im still into the idea of a physical copy. Tho in saying that a dl copy on a decently hardy and trustworthy portable drive is as good.

One big thing i can for see is the "steam" like annoyances, no doubt "wheres my expensive app" and what not.

Mind you steam is mainly a success, so if it works on a model close to it with updates and the likes then great news. Im all for the auto updates etc

All cars have steering wheels, but nobody points out which company had it first; just because a feature has been done before doesn't mean it isn't a good idea to implement it anyway.

If nothing else, this proposed store would put an end to third-party updaters; everything would be monitored by the successor of the current Windows Update/Microsoft Update background service, thereby eliminating one of the keys ways in which computers tend to slow down over time for reasons that are all but invisible to the average user. Vendor-independent updating would also largely prevent developers foisting bundled software onto users (as with the Apple Software Update check box defaults a while back).

I can certainly foresee people setting up less knowledgeable friends' and relatives' PCs to only be able to install through the store interface, content in the knowledge that they can find and install any program they could possibly want without getting confused by installers or unknowingly catching some nasty malware in the process.

Microsoft pushing technological development to the limit once more, this time by inventing a centralized package manager.

LoveThePenguin said,
Copy GNU/Linux repository idea much?

Actually I was thinking looking at it is its more like Steam.

I've always wondered why Microsoft didn't use Linux-like repositories for application patches and updates.

Not sure how others feel about this but I hope it functions similar to the synaptic package manager of many Linux distros. That would make it a fairly useful tool.

Great idea, The same idea has worked on Ubuntu and I think MS will really define it into a great piece of software to allow PC noobs easy access to safe software!
Hope MS will inspect each app so malware can't get in!
Also i strongly agree with the idea proposed (in this thread) about a unified update system, where a program used a Windows API to update to minimize the processes running and stupid icons in the notification area.

Great if they make this, even better if it offers updates, centralized package manager is one of the things I really love about Linux.

It'd be cool if it were tied into the OS and you could choose content providers for downloads (kinda like repositories in linux-based distros). Have the default as Windows store and tie the online store into a desktop UI and it would be awesome. MS would need to write some APIs and require admin privileges to access the APIs to allow other sources to provide apps. Maybe some kind of standard format like XML for the actual content lists (can update lists via web) to be displayed in the desktop UI. Having trusted sources and an official default app hub integrated into Windows would be awesome

What is silly is that most isheep think everything needs an app store to be useful, not even taking into account before app stores there were these things called "programs" and "software applications" that numbered in the millions.

swanlee said,
What is silly is that most isheep think everything needs an app store to be useful, not even taking into account before app stores there were these things called "programs" and "software applications" that numbered in the millions.

Agreed, but I think the average user is getting less and less knowledgeable about how computers and OSes work. As recently as 2007, almost 40% of US households don't have computers nor Internet access. The PC revolution started 30 years ago, but there are still a lot of newbies out there.

bj55555 said,

Agreed, but I think the average user is getting less and less knowledgeable about how computers and OSes work. As recently as 2007, almost 40% of US households don't have computers nor Internet access. The PC revolution started 30 years ago, but there are still a lot of newbies out there.


thats the US, in europe there are several countries with over 90% internet access to every household.
even ex-3rd world countries have a amazingly high coverage of internet connections

I think that integrating an apps store into Windows is a great idea. I would even support them setting it by default to only allow apps from the apps store, as long as they follow the Android model and have a checkbox in the settings to allow non-market applications. For most users, this would be great. It would really cut down on malware.

Chugworth said,
I think that integrating an apps store into Windows is a great idea. I would even support them setting it by default to only allow apps from the apps store, as long as they follow the Android model and have a checkbox in the settings to allow non-market applications. For most users, this would be great. It would really cut down on malware.

This store is going to open up the market for sandboxed, out-of-browser applications written in Silverlight.

Chugworth said,
I think that integrating an apps store into Windows is a great idea. I would even support them setting it by default to only allow apps from the apps store, as long as they follow the Android model and have a checkbox in the settings to allow non-market applications. For most users, this would be great. It would really cut down on malware.

One thing's for sure. This app store + the prospect of targeting Windows Phone 7 platform without having to learn a new language and development platform will make jumping ship to Cocoa/Objective-C a LOT less appealing for the starry-eyed .NET/C# developers. Being able to sell your apps on a (sort of) level playing field with entire development houses is the one thing that makes the iTunes App Store appealing to independent developers. Having somebody else be able to take care of the distrbution of your work is a godsend.

Chugworth said,
I think that integrating an apps store into Windows is a great idea. I would even support them setting it by default to only allow apps from the apps store, as long as they follow the Android model and have a checkbox in the settings to allow non-market applications. For most users, this would be great. It would really cut down on malware.

erm, that wont happen... windows has one of the major advantages that pretty much anything u want with it, u can do it, even noobs can do allot with it.. they cant with linux..
locking down windows to only use aproved applications, will be a scare tactic, scaring off the experienced users to linux or mac, and with those users, many....many normal home users will follow.

But can I get porn with it? If it has sex in it, it will sell! </sarcasm>
Good idea but I can't see this catching on... Only reason the App store, or the xBox store, became so popular was because that was the only way people could get applications for those devices. When you are talking about a full fledge PC there are simply far to many distribution options of developers. MS will really have to push this if they want it to succeed.

Conjor said,
But can I get porn with it? If it has sex in it, it will sell! </sarcasm>
Good idea but I can't see this catching on... Only reason the App store, or the xBox store, became so popular was because that was the only way people could get applications for those devices. When you are talking about a full fledge PC there are simply far to many distribution options of developers. MS will really have to push this if they want it to succeed.

i first check out the repositories of my linux boxes before even bothering to go to a website to look for source,tarballs or w/e...

i love the package managers, apt-get was great, aptitude is awesomme (<3 debian for creating it)

Even on windows7, for most of my drivers, i only have to check out the update center, no need to go to websites and what not, cant wait till i can have a (offcourse) microsoft version of the package manager that works well

Among other things...if they can build centralized third-party app updates into this, so we don't all end up with 30 dumb "check for update" apps running all the time on our systems, then I'm all for it.

Heck, make it a requirement...don't allow apps to install their own update checker, but rather, have them plug into a Windows Update equivalent API for third-parties.

_dandy_ said,
Among other things...if they can build centralized third-party app updates into this, so we don't all end up with 30 dumb "check for update" apps running all the time on our systems, then I'm all for it.

Heck, make it a requirement...don't allow apps to install their own update checker, but rather, have them plug into a Windows Update equivalent API for third-parties.


+1111111111111111111111111111111111

_dandy_ said,
Among other things...if they can build centralized third-party app updates into this, so we don't all end up with 30 dumb "check for update" apps running all the time on our systems, then I'm all for it.

Heck, make it a requirement...don't allow apps to install their own update checker, but rather, have them plug into a Windows Update equivalent API for third-parties.

_dandy_ said,
Among other things...if they can build centralized third-party app updates into this, so we don't all end up with 30 dumb "check for update" apps running all the time on our systems, then I'm all for it.

Heck, make it a requirement...don't allow apps to install their own update checker, but rather, have them plug into a Windows Update equivalent API for third-parties.

Love this idea.

If only they would do it with the drivers too, and run everything through devicestage. It would be super cool

_dandy_ said,
Among other things...if they can build centralized third-party app updates into this, so we don't all end up with 30 dumb "check for update" apps running all the time on our systems, then I'm all for it.

Heck, make it a requirement...don't allow apps to install their own update checker, but rather, have them plug into a Windows Update equivalent API for third-parties.


This.
This was one thing Ubuntu etc did better than windows (package manager). Hopefully it will be free to use for high quality free/open source software. A universal update manager + this 'store' for one click installation of high quality apps would be great.

_dandy_ said,
Among other things...if they can build centralized third-party app updates into this, so we don't all end up with 30 dumb "check for update" apps running all the time on our systems, then I'm all for it.

Heck, make it a requirement...don't allow apps to install their own update checker, but rather, have them plug into a Windows Update equivalent API for third-parties.


this is already part of the vista/windows7 update center, not microsofts fault that just a few driver manufactures use it.

dr spock said,

This.
This was one thing Ubuntu etc did better than windows (package manager). Hopefully it will be free to use for high quality free/open source software. A universal update manager + this 'store' for one click installation of high quality apps would be great.

do what better, rip off an exact copy of a packet manager from their mother distro?
at least microsoft writes their own, windows updater is similiar to (sudo) apt-get update, but barely any driver/software company uses this, not microsofts fault.
ATI uses it afaik, i get my video drivers from windows update, no need to go to the website to update it
same goes for my motherboard drivers, which is an Asus motherboard...

Shadowzz said,

this is already part of the vista/windows7 update center, not microsofts fault that just a few driver manufactures use it.

I was talking about apps, not drivers. I'm well aware that drivers are available on Windows Update.

Might be good, as long as MS doesn't get the usual hunger for power once something works. It could be one of the most enticing features for windows or it could be the thing MS uses to tell developers what they can and cant do and then leaves a years down the road.

Jan said,
Make it a separate app from the OS and give it frequent updates.

Oh don't you worry, the EU will ensure that nothing is bundled with Windows

winlonghorn said,

Where did it say that?

The proposed UI design screenshot, in the article. It's basically just like the other Metro UI's, especially like Zune's desktop UI.

i think it will be a success.. the regular consumer usually prefers finding everything in a one stop solution rather than going out, or surfing the net for solutions...

They might have something...