Microsoft posts Vine clip hinting at WebGL support for IE10 ... or IE11?

For the past couple of years, Microsoft has said, "No" to putting in WebGL support in its Internet Explorer browsers, due to various security concerns. Now it appears that the company could be changing its mind on the matter, and the news comes from a rather unusual source.

Earlier this month, Microsoft started a campaign to promote IE10 via quick clips on Vine, Twitter's embedded video service. Today, the company posted up its latest Vine clip, where a puppet version of "IE Sr." chats with an equally puppet version of IE10, stating "HTML5? What's next; WebGL?", The two puppets then look directly at the camera before the clip ends.

The change of heart on Microsoft's part with WebGL might happen as early as June, when a preview version of Windows 8.1 is scheduled to be released. In an leaked build of the update that was released on the Internet in March, a programmer discovered evidence of WebGL interfaces in that build's version of Internet Explorer, iE11, although they were not actually functional at the time. It's possible that WebGL support could bypass IE10 and only be released as part of IE11.

Some website developers feel that the lack of WebGL support in current versions of IE have resulted in a number of web-based games and other apps running slower in the browser compared to Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox, both of which support WebGL.

Source: The Browser You Love To Hate

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To me it looks like IE10 is selling a couple grams of HTML5 to an older IE (IE8)

Does this imply that Microsoft will update IE8 with HTML5 support?

S3P€hR said,
Microsoft must adopt webkit and make a real competitor for chrome. IE has a bad reputation

Sure because your understanding of browser engines is just about who makes it. The IE engine is super fast (so fast that it runs windows apps), standards compliant (I made a site the other day where only IE10 would support shadows using the standards while Mozilla and chrome needed vendor specific properties) and has a lot less security issues in comparison to pretty much everything else. Not to mention that after so many years it is the only browser to support GPO which is one of the major reasons Firefox and Chrome failed to capture the business market share during Microsoft's' sleeping period (IE7,8).

S3P€hR said,
Microsoft must adopt webkit and make a real competitor for chrome. IE has a bad reputation

To be honest, what they really need to do is just provide regular updates to IE (and I'm not talking about security patches, I'm talking about REAL updates with new features/better standards support, etc) ...that's where Microsoft have been going wrong with IE in recent years, and why they are now lagging somewhat behind other browser offerings! Using Trident itself (as opposed to say WebKit) isn't really the issue - it's the lack of regular updates to Trident that's given IE a bad reputation!

S3P€hR said,
Microsoft must adopt webkit and make a real competitor for chrome. IE has a bad reputation

If we are going to enforce standardizing on one code base, then I say that OSX, Linux, iOS, Andoid should be gotten rid of and everybody be forced to use Win8.

S3P€hR said,
Microsoft must adopt webkit and make a real competitor for chrome. IE has a bad reputation

No thanks. WebKit is not standardized code. If anything, the other browsers should drop it and let all browsers use web standard code. I hate when people code with Webkit and only works in one or two browsers and then telling people to switch their browser. Telling people what to use is not the way to go. Also, WebKit is the lazy way of coding, it's all about HTML/HTML5, CSS/CSS3, and JavaScript.

pickypg said,
Even Chrome doesn't run on WebKit anymore...
Well, actually, it does... They're moving away from it but they are still webkit for current releases. It's not a flick of a switch, it takes time to move.

mog0 said,
Well, actually, it does... They're moving away from it but they are still webkit for current releases. It's not a flick of a switch, it takes time to move.
Ah, yes; you got me on an extreme technicality. The final major release (Chrome 27) of Chrome using WebKit was released the same day that you commented.

More to the point, the day that Blink was created, it was literally just a renamed version (fork) of WebKit. They could have quite literally switched over to using it at that point at the flip of a switch (or build items, as the case may be).

Blink is not a major rewrite of WebKit. At the start, it is simply the removal of all of the code that they were already not using from Safari (or whatever other projects had committed code that was unused by Chrome). It will only be some point in the future that they truly diverge, as new features that they add will not be shared, and new features from WebKit will not automatically be inherited. Of course, will the comparatively slow development from Apple, I expect that Blink will leave WebKit behind rather than the reverse.

The point being: suggesting that someone move to WebKit to be competitive is not only naive, but it is foolish. At the time of his post, Google had already announced a new engine that will diverge from WebKit--forked from WebKit and named Blink--and it has already removed millions of lines of code that were shared, but unused by Chrome. That fact alone should suggest that the marriage of WebKit with your own project (e.g., Internet Explorer) is not a fix-all. Your gotcha is correct, excluding the last statement ("it takes time"), but it's nothing but a gotcha.

John Callaham said,
The puppet is IE10, not IE11

Yes, but they look to the camera and say "what's next?" (which I take to imply as meaning post-IE10). It would be very unlike Microsoft to suddenly put a major feature such as WebGL into their browser and NOT bump the version number! ...so I think +DonC is right, WebGL is more likely going to come with IE11, rather than being added as an after-thought to IE10. After all, IE11 itself is now not that far away!

They don't have to admit that they are when, in fact, they are.

When was the last time you saw any non-security related fixes being released for existing versions of IE? Never. Microsoft doesn't update their browsers unless they find a security flaw. They know it but they don't seem to be doing anything about it (just look at the IE section of Microsoft Connect).