Microsoft posts Webkit to IE adaptation guide

One of the biggest complaints around Windows Phone has been the fact that even though Internet Explorer 10 is a really good browser, many websites still look awful due to outdated mobile sites. And that’s because most mobile websites target Webkit browsers and completely ignore IE.

Now Microsoft has published a pretty detailed guide on how to adapt your Webkit focused website to work great with Internet Explorer 10. The guide has 5 steps that covers the most common issues, and should help any developer address this problem.

They state, and we totally agree, that by making a few small changes not only will devs have less code to maintain but, more importantly, they will give their customers a much better experience. Microsoft also notes that in the majority of cases changes to code will be minimal.

The post ends with a “Call to action” paragraph that urges developers to use this guide and do all Windows Phone users a giant favor, and improve their sites.

It’s nice to see Microsoft finally standing up for its customers and we hope this works and more folks get onboard. 

Source: Windows Phone Developer Blog

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18 Comments

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It would be a lot easier if the main browsers simply agreed to use the same prefixes for code that isn't standardized by w3 yet... Half of these fixes are simply removing -webkit- from the prefix.

Omen1393 said,
It would be a lot easier if the main browsers simply agreed to use the same prefixes for code that isn't standardized by w3 yet... Half of these fixes are simply removing -webkit- from the prefix.

And coding CSS would be WAY easier.
There are so many ways to do a simple gradient - you need like 5 different CSS lines for a simple f-ing gradient.

Prefixes are hell.

And to think some people think this "CSS-hell" will replace things like Flash. Pfft..

Frankenchrist said,
even better to use is:

<!--[if IE]>
Internet Explorer, eh? Too bad. Nothing to see here for you.
<![endif]-->

YSK that conditional comments don't work in IE10's standards mode.

thealexweb said,
Tad harsh to call them outdated just because they target iOS and Android

Finally Microsoft decided to get on with this. Many websites are just optimized to webkit and on IE10 they look like it is 2006 all over again. On Windows Phone we have to resort to requesting the full desktop version. It looks and works better on many sites.

Hopefully web devs can get their stuff together and start making their sites IE10-friendly.

thealexweb said,
Tad harsh to call them outdated just because they target iOS and Android

Actually, it's not harsh enough! It's not just Microsoft that suffers. Mozilla and Opera do too. The Web is an open platform. All Web developers must make an effort to support all Web browsers. These developers that have designed only for WebKit on the mobile Web should be ashamed. There's no excuse for not supporting other browsers.

It annoys me so much that we're in this situation. A lot of risky decisions have been made to sort out this fragmentation that Apple and Google have created by using proprietary or vendor-locked APIs and properties. This is the worst problem the Web has faced since the original browser wars.

Meph said,
These developers that have designed only for WebKit on the mobile Web should be ashamed. There's no excuse for not supporting other browsers.
Why do I have a nasty feeling that many developers are using WebKit prefixes and then blaming IE for poor standards support?

ingramator said,
This is good, IE needs to be recognised and its good Microsoft has taken this on board.

IE would be more recognised if they updated their browser more often rather than leaving years between major updates. Out of all the browsers we benchmarked earlier this week, IE 9 came last in both the HTML 5 and CSS 3 compliance tests, and IE10 came second to last in the CSS 3 compliance test, and third to last in the HTML 5 compliance test!

IE has a long was yet to go to making their browser standards compliant!

Our full report on the current top browser's performance can be found here: http://blog.mid.as/2012/11/14/...t-the-top-six-head-to-head/

This doesn't tell too much. I develop sites from scratch, and somehow I can always make them look and behave identical in all major browsers (FF, Chrome, IE9, Opera, Safari) without ANY browser-specific code.

In MOST cases the reason why IE fails is browser-specific code tailored for other browsers, not that IE doesn't support enough things. Obviously browsers will ALWAYS lag behind specs (as with any other tech), so these benchmarks don't serve too much purpose other than some fapfaping like "weee my browser supports 942 CSS elements and yours only supports 844!"

(But I understand you need to find ways to advertise your site...lol)

bviktor said,
This doesn't tell too much. I develop sites from scratch, and somehow I can always make them look and behave identical in all major browsers (FF, Chrome, IE9, Opera, Safari) without ANY browser-specific code.

In MOST cases the reason why IE fails is browser-specific code tailored for other browsers, not that IE doesn't support enough things. Obviously browsers will ALWAYS lag behind specs (as with any other tech), so these benchmarks don't serve too much purpose other than some fapfaping like "weee my browser supports 942 CSS elements and yours only supports 844!"

(But I understand you need to find ways to advertise your site...lol)


This, I also have no issues making websites look similar across all browsers. Even back in IE6 days that was quite easy actually.
It is indeed the Mozilla- and webkit- css specific code that make websites look like crap. What Is supported now, might change and in a next FX release the Mozilla- tag will become a mainstream tag and now it'll mysteriously stop working.

IE does not need to update so regulary, because its a product aimed at 2 different markets at once, while focusing on 1... enterprise market. Not consumer market.
A released browser version should remain identical over its lifetime. Only thing updating is security and exploits. Not like FX who used to change css/html functionality in ooint releases.
Or as they do now, that css/html functionality still changes between their releases.

Stop crying to IE for breaking your website... learn to code.

GreatMarkO said,

IE would be more recognised if they updated their browser more often rather than leaving years between major updates. Out of all the browsers we benchmarked earlier this week, IE 9 came last in both the HTML 5 and CSS 3 compliance tests, and IE10 came second to last in the CSS 3 compliance test, and third to last in the HTML 5 compliance test!

IE has a long was yet to go to making their browser standards compliant!

Our full report on the current top browser's performance can be found here: http://blog.mid.as/2012/11/14/...t-the-top-six-head-to-head/

HTML5 isn't even a finished standard yet, so as usual you are full of ****

Shadowzz said,
Stop crying to IE for breaking your website... learn to code.

^ THIS

GreatMarkO said,

IE would be more recognised if they updated their browser more often rather than leaving years between major updates. Out of all the browsers we benchmarked earlier this week, IE 9 came last in both the HTML 5 and CSS 3 compliance tests, and IE10 came second to last in the CSS 3 compliance test, and third to last in the HTML 5 compliance test!

IE has a long was yet to go to making their browser standards compliant!

Our full report on the current top browser's performance can be found here: http://blog.mid.as/2012/11/14/...t-the-top-six-head-to-head/


IE supports finalized HTML5 and CSS3 specs and those that show the most promise in making the final cut for HTML5 and CSS3 standards. They have explained this many, many times before. Neither HTML5 nor CSS3 are finalized, and many of the standards' specs make no sense to implement based on the fact that they aren't finished, are not optimal, or already have better implementations that have been or are close to being finalized. This is why IE9 and 10 do not score well in standards compliance tests. These tests (especially ACID3) test specs of HTML5 and CSS3 that will NOT make the final cut and will NOT be implemented in the final versions of the HTML5 and CSS3 standards. Not to mention that NEITHER of these specs will be complete until 2016, at which point they will start considering specs/features that did not make the cut for HTML5/CSS3 to be added in a .1 update to the standards.

Nice idea, apart from a few MS specific things (Like their pointer events idea, and their implementation of flexbox) the guide also covers making the site work properly in Firefox and Opera as well.