Microsoft preparing response to Xbox One DRM concerns

Larry Hryb, director of programming for Xbox Live, recently stated that Microsoft is listening to negative feedback on Xbox One's digital rights management issues, and now it appears responses to those concerns will soon be provided.

Responding to a Twitter user, Hryb said he will provide answers for DRM concerns and reiterated that Microsoft is listening to consumer feedback and that he is working on a response to address concerns. Hryb didn't say, however, if consumer feedback would have any impact on Microsoft's plans for the recently announced console.

Microsoft hasn't been clear on the exact DRM restrictions imposed by its upcoming console, causing confusion about how often it has to be connected to the Internet to work. Additionally, the company has said it's working on a feature "to enable customers to trade in and resell games," though it won't reveal how that method works until later.

Users of the gaming website NeoGAF recently started a campaign to bombard Microsoft and Sony with feedback on DRM issues such as persistent Internet connections requirements and similar issues, prompting Hryb's statements that Microsoft is listening to feedback. Microsoft had been expected to address DRM concerns at its E3 press conference on June 10, though the backlash may have sped up those plans.

Source: Larry Hryb on Twitter

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TPreston said,
Consumers will never stand for a system that links the game they paid for to an online account, That forces them to use online services, That isn't made by Gabe Newell (if it is they'll go down on all fours).

And Steam sales continue to grow...

Steam is nothing like a console....
Steam offers games on sale constantly. Games on a PC can be modded, work with hardware from all ages ( as long as your pc is powerful enough ), and will allow you to play them offline, even if steam goes down. Consoles on the other hand do not provide those services, and limit you in even more ways.
Please, stop trying to compare apples and oranges.

shakey said,
Steam is nothing like a console....
Steam offers games on sale constantly. Games on a PC can be modded, work with hardware from all ages ( as long as your pc is powerful enough ), and will allow you to play them offline, even if steam goes down. Consoles on the other hand do not provide those services, and limit you in even more ways.
Please, stop trying to compare apples and oranges.

I wasn't aware I did, Thanks for the red herring stating what everyone already knows. but it doesn't change the DRM hypocrisy.

Ok when gabe does it, Outrage when Microsoft does the same thing.

shakey said,
Steam is nothing like a console....
Steam offers games on sale constantly. Games on a PC can be modded, work with hardware from all ages ( as long as your pc is powerful enough ), and will allow you to play them offline, even if steam goes down. Consoles on the other hand do not provide those services, and limit you in even more ways.
Please, stop trying to compare apples and oranges.

I'm aware of that. But the comment was the basic idea that tying your games to an account was something nobody would ever do. And yet they do every day. And last I checked, Steam doesn't only make great sales numbers during promotions.

Also, Microsoft has not stated you cannot play games offline. If I recall correctly they've said or at least mentioned that it would be just the opposite.

I still don't see how consoles "limit" you. They are for a specific purpose. They limit you in relation to PC gaming no more than a tablet limits you in functionality vs. a computer. It's a device made for a specific purpose. Expect limitations.

I think the One is a great name. Everyone I've talked to is pretty excited about it actually.

My sense is that certain gaming sites and bloggers have been fanning the flames of controversy to drive traffic. Lots of gamers seem to think that the rumors of no support for used games, always-on Internet connection, activation fees, etc., are straight-up facts. When the details are known, I think gamers will find that the Xbox One will remain a very gamer- and developer-friendly platform.

Yes and then they will all proceed to take credit for the decisions (that were already in place) so that they can feel like they are important watch dogs or something.

Seriously don't even call me a gamer anymore, I'm embarrassed to be associated with these children after the crap I've witnessed in the past couple of months. The reaction to hearing that DRM would be necessary was akin to seeing a kid drop his ice cream cone on the floor. The best word to describe gamer reactions to our DRM reality is "TANTRUM." You would think these people were oblivious to the existence of the PC and PC software. Perhaps they're so used to stealing everything on torrent they don't even know how software licensing works.

im not buying these consoles, as i dont want them online all the time, hell my 360 is never on line its not even hooked up to the net

the funniest thing I've read so far with XBOX fan boys was a comparison between the XBOX One and PS4 "CPU Architecture"... they are basically the same thing! with a few small differences, the core design is the same! and they went on to say that the XBOX One has a more advanced instruction set then the PS4..... huh? it's x86-64 instruction sets! same across the two platforms!

neufuse said,
the funniest thing I've read so far with XBOX fan boys was a comparison between the XBOX One and PS4 "CPU Architecture"... they are basically the same thing! with a few small differences, the core design is the same! and they went on to say that the XBOX One has a more advanced instruction set then the PS4..... huh? it's x86-64 instruction sets! same across the two platforms!

Maybe, he may be getting at the fact that Microsoft have MASSIVE expertise in CPU design. A while a go they actually provided AMD with a lot of engineers so they could make a decent processor and Intel initially refused (MS and Intel actually have a love hate relationship). Anyway, the CPU will not be "custom" as in it had a differnent logo or some crap like that, it will be optimised for processing, efficiency etc GREATLY.

I'm also going to have to call you out on the "same thing". Just because two processors have the same "instruction set" doesn't mean they don't go about completely different ways to resolve the fetch execute cycle.... Common misconception is that an AMD x86 processor is practically the same as an Intel x86 one. This is totally and utterly false and it would not surprise me if the internals and logic within the XB1's CPU was vastly different from the PS4s but only time will tell.

neufuse said,
the funniest thing I've read so far with XBOX fan boys was a comparison between the XBOX One and PS4 "CPU Architecture"... they are basically the same thing! with a few small differences, the core design is the same! and they went on to say that the XBOX One has a more advanced instruction set then the PS4..... huh? it's x86-64 instruction sets! same across the two platforms!

Good that it's funny to you, but I don't really think you understand!

kaotic said,
And it will probably be more expensive. And you will NEVER see a noticeable different in the gfx.

First off, pricing hasnt been announced for either console. Your speculation on this is a bit premature.

Secondly, yes, you WILL notice a 33% difference in graphics power. Want a comparison? Go compare an Nvidia 650 to the 670.

If they eliminate the DRM (both the "always on" phone home requirement AND the used games BS, AND they eliminate the Kinect requirement, I MIGHT buy this console. I doubt the will do this though. They might cave on the used games, but they are still going to try and shove their spycams down our throats.

from the article you just sent me to:
"Microsoft has more than ten years of experience making privacy a top priority."

From the first Google result from "Microsoft security breach":

"Microsoft is picking up the pieces from a data breach on its Xbox Entertainment Awards website, after thousands of voters entering a prize draw had their personal details inadvertently published on the site."


Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/201...urity-breach/#ixzz2UuQIulUZ

So, an entertainment awards website (that was most likely made very quickly, maybe in a couple of months) has a security issue (not really a surprise given the time frame) means they'll have privacy issues with something they've had in development for "years" to get right? As a developer, I don't see the correlation, but alright. When it comes to devices/hardware, it's either on or it's not, the privacy features won't be that difficult to implement.

There's probably no way they're going to eliminate the used game "blockage" they've announced already, or the periodic need to have the console check in with them online once every day. Both functions are tied to each other.

For many years now there's been speculation of game consoles being sold without an optical drive or any other physical delivery medium such as a cartridge, making them a "online digital delivery only" system. Well, this is as close to it as it will get before the physical medium is eliminated.

So far the argument was that broadband internet wasn't readily available for 100% of the user base, with this scheme that Microsoft has announced games basically have the same licence as Steam or mobile phone games, except that they eliminate the need to download the game by providing the installation media to the consumer, then the consumer can't complain that their internet connection doesn't allow them to download a 20GB game.

As it's been pointed out, the only reason Sony hasn't seized the opportunity to do a PR mockery of Microsoft's used game stance is because they've probably come up with the same system or something very similar to what Microsoft is doing. Simple as that. About Microsoft's "we're listening" statement, yes they're listening to the negative response to their announced used game policy, and the only thing they're "working on" is some more carefully crafted PR statements on the matter, and some sort of clever spin on how this is in the best interest of the consumer. Nothing more, nothing less. As long as games are required to be installed to the hard drive and are able to be played without the bluray in the optical drive there's just no way around this, else people would be able to install the game on their xbox and all their friends' xboxes too.

Unless they back off and require the disk to be present in the optical drive there's just no way around this, but we know that's most likely not going to happen. PS4 and X1 are very likely the last generation of game consoles with a physical delivery medium for games.

The one thing I'm most afraid of, is that games will take much longer to come down in price, since Microsoft and the publishers are forcefully inserting themselves between the consumer that the used games resellers. Used game stores will no longer be able to dictate when to lower the price of a used game, since Microsoft and the publishers will ask for a particular amount for each used game sold. Just look at the games on demand prices on Xbox Live and PSN, games that can be bought new for $10-$20 go for $40+ online, ridiculous! Unless this madness is reverted, this next console generation will suck for consumers.

erickdj said,
Microsoft and the publishers are forcefully inserting themselves between the consumer that the used games resellers.

This will not just be a Microsoft and publisher thing. It will be a Microsoft, Sony and Publisher thing.

Yes, that is my assumption as well. I just didn't want to include Sony just yet, since they haven't really said what their plan is. However, I'm pretty inclined to believe they will do the same sort of thing Microsoft is doing.

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