Microsoft providing feedback on HTML 5 editor's draft

Though the creation of the new HTML standard, HTML 5, has been mostly up to four of the big players in the browser world (Apple, Mozilla, Opera and Google), it appears that Microsoft has become more active as of late. CNET reports the news, detailing that Adrian Bateman, Internet Explorer Program Manager, has sent a letter to the World Wide Web Consortium, with Microsoft's thoughts and queries on the current editor's draft.

In the letter, found here, Bateman stated that, "As part of our planning for future work, the IE team is reviewing the current editor's draft of the HTML5 spec and gathering our thoughts. We want to share our feedback and discuss this in the working group. I will post our notes as we collect them so we can iterate on our thinking more quickly. At this stage we have more questions than answers, but I believe that discussing them in public is the best way to make progress." Additionally, Amy Barzdukas, general manager for Internet Explorer, said, "The support of ratified standards (that Web developers) can use is something that we are extremely supportive of. In some cases, it can be premature to start claiming support for standards that are not yet in fact standards."

HTML 5, as you know, brings a whole bunch of excellent new features. If you're under the impression that Microsoft has added none of them, then you're wrong; the Redmond-based company is accountable for ContentEditable, a feature in the new standard, which "lets elements of Web pages be edited in place by people using a browser" according to CNET. To add to this, the latest version of IE, version 8, supports the DOM Store, Ajax Navigation, Cross Document Messaging and Cross Domain Messaging, all HTML 5 components.

It's excellent to see the software giant getting more involved with the standard, as Internet Explorer is by far the most dominant browser on the market today; with that force behind HTML 5, it'll make for a much better experience for users and web developers.

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32 Comments

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I'm glad to see Microsoft supporting standards better. That's really great.

As for their involvement, I think they should be involved. It only makes sense given that they have a browser with market share.

You know whats horrible? That the team that develops IE does not educate other Microsoft Employees how to develop HTML pages... For example Sharepoint is all tables and poor html coding... Did you ever try to send an HTML email to someone who uses Outlook 2007? It completly ignores CSS, only few style attribute work...
Anyway IE 8 is ok, what is bad that most people still use IE6 and IE7...

i think they need to standardize and unbug their JS implementation before moving forward on any more HTML5 stuff. i think it's time all browsers implemented native CSS3 selectors in JS since pretty much all JS frameworks use Sizzle or DOMQuery, the former being much more awesome. i'm glad they added native JSON in, but as to be expected, it has an empty value encoding bug.

Well, you could look at the Firefox Themes and Addons site for statistics and I'm sure Firefox would be far ahead of IE zomg.

Quikboy said,
@Wodin: Do some research. Those stats aren't exactly reliable.

Actually the web site of the cie i'm working for have stats similar to those one (between 60 000 and 100 000 visitors a month).

How is Opera a "big player" and Microsoft isnt? Opera could fold and 97% of people wouldn't know who they are, what they did, or care.

AltecXP said,
How is Opera a "big player" and Microsoft isnt? Opera could fold and 97% of people wouldn't know who they are, what they did, or care.

The article doesn't state MS isn't? It says 4 of the big players, not "the big players". It was simply stating that 4 of the big companies were contributing towards HTML, and Microsoft is becoming a 5th.

mocax said,
Opera 10 has replaced Firefox as my alternative browser of choice.

Opera is so long down on my list after their whining, so I won't even try their browser in a while. Still use Opera Mini on the phone though.

If only IE8 could open up to extensions the way Firefox is and add a proper "smooth scrolling" experience, I would change it for Firefox.

They actively being involved in the workgroup for HTML5, its great.

ajua said,
If only IE8 could open up to extensions the way Firefox is and add a proper "smooth scrolling" experience, I would change it for Firefox.

They actively being involved in the workgroup for HTML5, its great.

Firefox has an AWFUL smooth scrolling experience. The only decent option is to install an extension called "Yet Another Smooth Scrolling" and play with it a bit. It becomes way faster and much smoother (a similar feature is already part of the upcoming version of FF).

Opera has had this feature by default for quite some time now.

ajua said,
If only IE8 could open up to extensions the way Firefox is and add a proper "smooth scrolling" experience, I would change it for Firefox.

They actively being involved in the workgroup for HTML5, its great.

They were part of the the workgroup for HTML4, and when they didn't get what they wanted, they went ahead and created IE6 and we all know what a POS that is and what a bane to web developers it is, we'll have to wait and see what happens this time

lomas said,
Firefox = Best browser on earth!!!

"*Lynx = Best browser on earth!!!"
(It's got a minimal amount of exploits and features because it's text based! :D)

n_K said,
"*Lynx = Best browser on earth!!!"
(It's got a minimal amount of exploits and features because it's text based! :D)

It should have been bundled with Windows instead of IE, then no one would have been upset. It could then be used to download whatever browser of choice.