Microsoft quietly shuts down Windows Live Help Community too

Microsoft has silently removed the Windows Live Help Community service and the link now redirects to Windows Live Help. This is one of the many Windows Live services being dropped in recent times. And Like Windows Live for TV, Help Community never made it out of beta.

For those of you who don't remember, Microsoft released Windows Live Help Community back in December 2006, providing another channel for users to get help for their Windows Live services. However, throughout the lifetime of the service, only three services ever utilized Help Community - that is Windows Live Admin Center, Windows Live Call for Free, and Help Community itself.

As noted back then on LiveSide, there seems to be too many help and feedback channels for Windows Live services, including:
Windows Live Account - Help Central
Windows Live Account - Feedback
Live Search QnA
Windows Live Help Community (now removed)
Windows Live Message Boards
Windows Live public newsgroups

Seems like Microsoft is finally getting their hands on to clean up the mess they've created with Windows Live and Live Search.

Link: LiveSide

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Yeah, we all knew the Live branding was crap from the start - even down to the horrific Vista colours using the horrible blue/green mix. And to think MS pays many people 6 figure salaries to think up this rubbish.

Get rid of the lot and just call it Microsoft Messenger. Microsoft Maps. Microsoft Web Search. Its not very inventive but at least it sticks and doesn't have to rely on some kind of unreliable marketing campaign to keep it alive.

well if it isn't working out, why keep it online and pay people to monitor these things with no activity? It is best just to get rid of these services that are useless, and keep the ones that are useful.

The Live initiative was stillborn. Most of the sites were ugly and barely usable. This is not a Microsoft problem, most web services stink. They need to drop the "Live" from OneCare lest it fall by the wayside, too, which would be unfortunate because it works pretty good for me.

(GreyWolfSC said @ #2)
The Live initiative was stillborn. Most of the sites were ugly and barely usable. This is not a Microsoft problem, most web services stink. They need to drop the "Live" from OneCare lest it fall by the wayside, too, which would be unfortunate because it works pretty good for me. :)

  • It was slow because of the heavily scripted, graphic-intensive pages.
  • Microsoft for a long time shut out non-IE users in a foolhardy attempt to preserve IE's rapidly dropping marketshare.
  • Few understood the difference between Live and MSN. There was too much Microsoft in-your-face branding all over it.
  • Microsoft tried to shove MS Passport down everyone's throats with it.
  • Censorship and general un-coolness turned people off. It felt like a service run by the NSA with all the security and regulations.
  • The services themselves weren't that great. Service was interrupted for a while when it first opened, turning many people off permanently.
  • Once again, it just wasn't very cool. Microsoft isn't cool. Microsoft is not what you think of when you're looking for a hassle-free experience.

(toadeater said @ #2.1)
Microsoft isn't cool. Microsoft is not what you think of when you're looking for a hassle-free experience.

No, you're not cool. And Microsoft is what I think of for something hassle-free. Windows, Office, Zune, etc.

(MightyJordan said @ #2.3)

No, you're not cool. And Microsoft is what I think of for something hassle-free. Windows, Office, Zune, etc.

Did you just unbox your first PC yesterday? When I think of hassle-free, first thing that comes to mind will never be Microsoft. And personal insults in defense of a company you have no actual vested interest in is just sad, be it Microsoft, Apple, Sony...