Microsoft reportedly acquires VideoSurf [Confirmed]

Microsoft has reportedly acquired VideoSurf, an Internet video search web site that was founded back in 2006 by four Israeli-born citizens but is based in San Mateo, California. The report, which was first announced by an Israeli web site, has yet to be confirmed by either Microsoft or VideoSurf. That same report said that Microsoft bought VideoSurf for "tens of millions of dollars." TechCrunch claims that the number is around $70 million. Earlier this year VideoSurf received about $28 million in funding from a number of investors including former US Vice President Al Gore.

VideoSurf's web site reportedly has over 20 million unique visitors a month. The site itself uses its own technology in order for its users to quickly find videos from a wide variety of sources including Hulu, CNN, TMZ, Metacafe, Fancast, Comedy Central, Dailymotion and others. Oddly, VideoSurf doesn't show YouTube, owned by Google, as one of the video sources that it uses for its searches.

Microsoft has likely acquired VideoSurf in an effort to improve its own Internet search services, specifically its Bing division. Bing is working hard to take market share in the Internet search business from Google and having an advanced video search engine would help Microsoft in those efforts.

[Update] The acquisition has been confirmed by Microsoft and they will use the technology to help bring content to their Xbox platform. 

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Nokia N9: One month and one software update on

Next Story

BBC testing new Metro inspired homepage

12 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

england_fanboy said,
This another massive blow for open source.

I'm guessing this is another one of your statements that will just have to take your word for?

Eh? What kind of goggles are you wearing, because I'm not sure we're looking at the same article.

Unless you think business purchases somehow represent a lack of innovation. But that'd be silly. Every company spends money on ideas. Whether it was Steve Jobs' approach of third parties presenting ideas that he would nitpick with a yes/no until it met his standards and he'd pay for them, Microsoft's approach of third parties presenting technology and Microsoft absorbing them and funding their work, or the open world's approach of copying each other's work back and forth, for free, forever, it's all just some variation on fishing outside your own walls for something new.

And remember, Microsoft doesn't simply buy companies, rebrand their products, and sell them as their own. They back the developers of the acquired technologies, apply the ideas in different directions, and move towards synergy with existing Microsoft work. This is the nature of almost ALL acquisitions, by any company, in any industry.

WindowsSlave said,
Further proof that Microsoft can't innovate and is becoming increasingly more irrelevant.

by that logic apple buying a 3D mapping company recently is further proof that apple can't innovate and is becoming increasing more irrelevant *rolls eyes*

Joshie said,
Eh? What kind of goggles are you wearing, because I'm not sure we're looking at the same article.

Unless you think business purchases somehow represent a lack of innovation. But that'd be silly. Every company spends money on ideas. Whether it was Steve Jobs' approach of third parties presenting ideas that he would nitpick with a yes/no until it met his standards and he'd pay for them, Microsoft's approach of third parties presenting technology and Microsoft absorbing them and funding their work, or the open world's approach of copying each other's work back and forth, for free, forever, it's all just some variation on fishing outside your own walls for something new.

And remember, Microsoft doesn't simply buy companies, rebrand their products, and sell them as their own. They back the developers of the acquired technologies, apply the ideas in different directions, and move towards synergy with existing Microsoft work. This is the nature of almost ALL acquisitions, by any company, in any industry.

Shhhhh. You're making too much sense.

WindowsSlave said,
Further proof that Microsoft can't innovate and is becoming increasingly more irrelevant.

Google BOUGHT Youtube. How is Microsoft's latest acquisition any different?

WindowsSlave said,
Further proof that Microsoft can't innovate and is becoming increasingly more irrelevant.

Google bought Android. Shrug.

neufuse said,

by that logic apple buying a 3D mapping company recently is further proof that apple can't innovate and is becoming increasing more irrelevant *rolls eyes*


not to mention Siri, and a couple dozen other companies