Microsoft requests most Google link takedowns

Google is now revealing to the public exactly how many requests it gets from companies that ask Google to remove website links from its search results for piracy or copyright violations. The official Google blog has announced a new page on its Transparency Report site called Copyright Removal Requests, which shows that in the last month, the company has received requests to remove over 1.2 million URLs from its search results.

Of that number, over 540,000 requests in the past month have come from Microsoft. A more detailed look at those requests show that most of them revolve around software and digital download sites, including The Pirate Bay.

Google says that the data on the Copyright Removal Request page goes back to July 2011. As you can see by the above graph, the number of requests has been increasing. The blog states, "These days it’s not unusual for us to receive more than 250,000 requests each week, which is more than what copyright owners asked us to remove in all of 2009." Google says it will be updating the page every day.

The blog also says that it will be keeping an eye out for requests that turn out to be a mistake or an effort to strike back at another company for reasons other than copyright or piracy issues. The blog states:

For example, we recently rejected two requests from an organization representing a major entertainment company, asking us to remove a search result that linked to a major newspaper’s review of a TV show. The requests mistakenly claimed copyright violations of the show, even though there was no infringing content. We’ve also seen baseless copyright removal requests being used for anticompetitive purposes, or to remove content unfavorable to a particular person or company from our search results.

Source: Official Google blog | Image via Google

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9 Comments

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drazgoosh said,
Well it's pretty much pirate sites, so that's a positive for most people I guess.

Don't you understand!? Take down one site, ten more pop up to replace it!!!1 DON'T YOU SEE!? We have to stop taking down ANY sites, outlaw copyrights and patents, make everything FREE AND OPEN, shut down corporations, and then we'll TRULY INNOVATE!

/somepeopleactuallythinkthisway

The smartscreen and phising technologies IE and other product use at Microsoft also contribute to a list of risks, that are tested and if found to be scams and malware sites get forwarded on to Google to be removed too.

If people think it is a bad thing for Microsoft to be asking for scams and sites designed to spread malware to be removed from a search engine, they need to have their moral compass checked.

thenetavenger said,
The smartscreen and phising technologies IE and other product use at Microsoft also contribute to a list of risks, that are tested and if found to be scams and malware sites get forwarded on to Google to be removed too.

If people think it is a bad thing for Microsoft to be asking for scams and sites designed to spread malware to be removed from a search engine, they need to have their moral compass checked.

Ah yes because EVERY site IE thinks is malware is of course, malware. Not something legit.

There are plenty of reasons fewer and fewer people are using IE and false positives are one of them.

I find it hard to believe that Microsoft is only trying to protect its own software, as the requests amount to more than half of ALL take-down requests received by Google. It sounds to me like Microsoft is trying to police the internet on behalf of other companies and it's trying to shape how people access content on the internet - i.e. censorship.

"Of that number, over 540,000 requests in the past month have come from Microsoft. A more detailed look at those requests show that most of them revolve around software and digital download sites, including The Pirate Bay."

Good job reading the article.