Microsoft Research making Bing Now app project for Windows Phone

Microsoft showed off a lot of interesting new software and hardware projects as part of its TechFest 2013 event last week. One project that went under the radar a bit came to light today in a new article that shows a new way to learn about locations such as restaurants and bars.

The MIT Technology Review website posted a look at what the article called Bing Now, an app for Windows Phone devices that's being worked on at Microsoft Research. The app is attempting to solve a problem about online reviews for locations. Sometimes the reviews don't have the latest information and text reviews can't really give users a true idea of what the atmosphere of a place such as a bar is like.

Bing Now tries to solve this problem by having a user with the app check into a location, as they might with other social networking apps. The smartphone's microphone then takes samples of the location's sounds. The Bing Now app could then determine if the location had a "low,” “normal,” or “high" level of sound, even down to which song, if any, is playing at that location.

This kind of information could be useful if a person wanted to go to a restaurant that is quiet at a certain period of time or louder at another point in the day. At the moment, there's no word on if Bing Now will be more than just a research project.

Source: MIT Technology Review

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14 Comments

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So many complaints about the name - for a research project, not even a product. Where were these people when Apple stole NTT DoCoMo's iMode branding strategy and started putting a small I in front of all their product names. Nobody complained then.

i was thinking innovation right there... but its common sense. like will it be busy at dinner and tea times, yeah will it be busy at 3pm in the week. not so much. If the restaurant isnt busy at the peak periods, chances are its crap and know not to bother again. although some ppl like quieter atmospheres other ppl like it mental, and could fluctuate day from day so unless they have a graph covering long periods of days and that citing the decibel lvl etc then it bloody useless

This is why I did not choose Microsoft, They are always number 2 in everything, they just stop as soon as their competitors are gone, and start as soon as they are threatened

john.smith_2084 said,
This is why I did not choose Microsoft, They are always number 2 in everything, they just stop as soon as their competitors are gone, and start as soon as they are threatened

You realize this is completely, 100% different than Google now, right? AFAIK no one is doing this, or at least no major company. Unless you're complaining that they copied the "now" name, which Google actually "copied" from msnNow, using your logic or if you're complaining about something different, I might have misunderstood

ughhh... no MS... tbh they created the website "MSN Now" before Google announced Google Now-I think- .... but still THEY SHOULD'VE CHOOSE ANOTHER NAME now everybody will say that they copy everyone...

This is actually pretty crazy and cool! I'd love to have this! But I'm assuming this only works if a lot of people use it, otherwise where would the data come from?

j2006 said,
This is actually pretty crazy and cool! I'd love to have this! But I'm assuming this only works if a lot of people use it, otherwise where would the data come from?

Well, it should work with only one person at the restaurant - it takes a 10 second sound clip and uses that to determine how loud, busy, etc. the place is

Oh I get it, because there's a completely different type of product called Google Now, and there's never been any example of anything like this ever happening before in the history of software names.

I mean, it's not like Microsoft beat Google to the punch with other super simple names, like Plus, right? Yeah. There was never a 'plus' product from Microsoft. And certainly not a family of products.