Microsoft reveals final look of Kinect for Windows v2 hardware

Microsoft announced in May that the Kinect sensor made for the Xbox One console would also be released in a Windows version. This week, the company revealed the final look of the Kinect for Windows v2 device and as you might expect, the changes compared to the Xbox One version are minimal.

In a post on the Kinect for Windows blog, Microsoft says that the "Kinect" branding is visible on the top of the sensor and a simple power indicator is placed on the right side of the product, rather than the glowing Xbox logo.  The hardware will also come with a hub that serves as a connection from the sensor to the power supply and the USB 3.0 cable that's needed for the PC link.

Microsoft started sending hardware and SDK preview versions of Kinect for Windows v2 to thousands of developers in November in order to give them a head start on app creation. In fact, NASA started using the preview hardware as part of their robotic research. This week's blog states that the final version is "getting closer and closer to launch" but so far the company has not revealed a specific date for that event.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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28 Comments

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I appreciate Kinect is more advanced than Leap Motion, but is it really so much more cutting edge that it needs to be the size of a brick and still require a large external power supply?

Kinect for Windows makes a lot of sense, but not really like this. Integrated directly into devices (like Leap Motion has been making deals to do) then sure, but right now I could buy one of these and not even be able to navigate the Start Screen with it.

I've seen a lot of cool projects in industry (such as in hospitals) using Kinect v1 so I know there's a lot of specialist uses out there that really help people but it would be good to see some progress at making a consumer play with it. Even if it's just a gimmick like Leap.

Also, for those who already have an Xbox One, do they have to buy this PC version or can they plug the XB1 version into a PC to develop for?

Maybe at least some of this will change/become clearer at Build next week...

They should of have kept the XBOX logo. If they are trying to unify the brands and identities of the different things in the company, they should of have kept that logo. Just because there would have been an XBOX logo there, it would not have meant that it is just for gaming.

Tech Star said,
They should of have kept the XBOX logo. If they are trying to unify the brands and identities of the different things in the company, they should of have kept that logo. Just because there would have been an XBOX logo there, it would not have meant that it is just for gaming.

"Should have."

I shouldn't of to tell you that. <-- That's how crazy it sounds.

I can understand cost concerns, but how much can it really cost to use a smaller housing? That said, I'm very much looking forward to seeing how this performs, been waiting a long time for a better mousetrap.

Well I say you're wrong as of now but in future for sure when they can shrink the hardware while maintaining the same level of accuracy we'll see a smaller unit.

Microsoft needs to make this thing smaller. Nobody really cares for Kinect, except for kids. However for the big boys and girls who make money, the market is evolving where tech like this is getting smaller and smaller. It's definitely out there as Samsung has already incorporated Kinect-like features in their smartphones and tablets. If Samsung can do it, how come Microsoft can't? If the tech is there, then why is this Kinect-thing look rather big?

VictorWho said,
Microsoft needs to make this thing smaller. Nobody really cares for Kinect, except for kids. However for the big boys and girls who make money, the market is evolving where tech like this is getting smaller and smaller. It's definitely out there as Samsung has already incorporated Kinect-like features in their smartphones and tablets. If Samsung can do it, how come Microsoft can't? If the tech is there, then why is this Kinect-thing look rather big?
Are you really comparing the technology behind the Kinect to some gimmick Samsung put in their phones and tablets?

like all things samsung, it will probably attempt to do the same, but fail miserably in execution. The type of sensors and cameras on kinect are large for a reason and kinect sees in IR. so when you play with the lights off, the samsung tech is basically blind.

VictorWho said,
Microsoft needs to make this thing smaller. Nobody really cares for Kinect, except for kids. However for the big boys and girls who make money, the market is evolving where tech like this is getting smaller and smaller. It's definitely out there as Samsung has already incorporated Kinect-like features in their smartphones and tablets. If Samsung can do it, how come Microsoft can't? If the tech is there, then why is this Kinect-thing look rather big?

nobody cares for kinecct except for kids??
are you kidding me? have you not seen all of the applications and projects the first gen kinect was used for?

VictorWho said,
It's definitely out there as Samsung has already incorporated Kinect-like features in their smartphones and tablets.

Sorry, it's not quite like that. Kinect 2 represents *the* state-of-the-art in computer perception. Samsung has no technology with detection capabilities that rival the Kinect 2 at its price point. Actually, no one does.

This is because the Kinect 2 focuses on a new class of superior detection technology known as "time of flight" sensing instead of the same "structured light" technique of the Kinect 1. Those technologies you see being embedded in cellphones or tablets? Structured light. The company that Apple bought recently? Structured light. Kinect 2 is a whole different ballgame.

Nice work mentioning technology getting smaller then using Samsung as an example when there's every chance next years Galaxy S will come with it's own travel case.

benjimoola said,
you are one of those Linux people who says everything Microsoft does is bad.

They probably think earth would stop spinning if Linux goes poof.