Microsoft Store site currently not taking pre-orders for 512 GB Surface Pro 2

Microsoft started taking pre-orders for both the Surface 2 and Surface Pro 2 earlier this week. While there hasn't been as big of an initial rush from consumers to get the company's next generation of tablets compared to the launches of the original Surface RT and Surface Pro, it appears that one of the new products is more popular than the rest.

The Microsoft Store website is currently not accepting any pre-orders for the 512 GB version of the Surface Pro 2. It's possible that the company simply did not make enough of the 512 GB model compared to the other versions in its initial shipment. However, it does seem to show that there is a demand for the version of the Surface Pro 2 with the largest amount of storage, even if it is the most expensive at $1,799.

If you still want to get the 512 GB version, the Best Buy website is still accepting pre-orders for the tablet. Pre-orders should start shipping to customers on October 22nd, which is the same day that the new Surface tablets are scheduled to make their debut on store shelves in 21 markets worldwide.

Source: Microsoft Store | Image via Microsoft

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Anyone that thinks this is expensive, just look at the Chromebook Pixel! It's still good 'value' compared to that which doesn't even have a proper operating system. It's £1,049 here in the UK in case anyone was wondering.

Starting with the base 64GB model, the prices jumps are:

$100 for 128GB, $300 for the 256GB, and a whopping $500 for the the 512GB.

I only wish it was a standard mSata SSD so I could save money and replace it myself.

i_was_here said,
Starting with the base 64GB model, the prices jumps are:

$100 for 128GB, $300 for the 256GB, and a whopping $500 for the the 512GB.

I only wish it was a standard mSata SSD so I could save money and replace it myself.

The 256GB and 512GB also come with more RAM iirc. You can't get a 512GB with 4GB of RAM, it's only 8GB which is another added cost. And the fact this isn't a mSATA SSD and right on the board adds even more to the cost during production.

i_was_here said,
Starting with the base 64GB model, the prices jumps are:

$100 for 128GB, $300 for the 256GB, and a whopping $500 for the the 512GB.

I only wish it was a standard mSata SSD so I could save money and replace it myself.

You can always add your own USB 3.0 'stub/stick' drive.

I think demand for the Pro with more storage was always the case, which is why I think they shouldn't have done a 64GB model at all. Just have the 128GB model starting at $899 and then go up. Either way, when they first did the 256GB model in Japan and then brought it out to more markets I expected they'd go higher with the 2nd gen and it seems that for the "Pro" market it's aimed at they want as much storage as they can get.

Lord Method Man said,
Don't forget another $120 for a keyboard cover and $200 for a glorified USB hub disguised as a "docking station."
Holy s$$$, that over 2 grand! Yup, these will be flying off the assembly line.

Macbook Air with 512 GB SSD and 8GB RAM costs $1600, and has a crappt 1366x768 display and no touch screen. These are premium tablets for people interested in paying for quality.

JHBrown said,
$1800? LMAO!

Microsoft isn't playing the market share grab anymore. If they sells just one $1,799 Surface, they makes more profit than Google does with 50 Nexus 7s at their current margins. The high price tag also helps to improve brand quality even if it doesn't sell much. Im sure they don't expect to sell many of those configurations.

Jarrichvdv said,
Surface Pro is a real nice laptop with all the benefits of a tablet.

Yeah, I mean you're getting a new generation i5, 512GB storage, 8GB RAM, 7hrs battery life or more depending on what you do, full HD display and so on. It's not like you're getting bad hardware here and they're not just swapping a SSD in some case with these. I bet they're soldiered on to the board itself which adds to production time and costs a bit more than just changing a SSD in a slot.

Jarrichvdv said,
Surface Pro is a real nice laptop with all the benefits of a tablet.

Just a matter of personal preference: I prefer a Convertible over a Slate device.

Fritzly said,

Just a matter of personal preference: I prefer a Convertible over a Slate device.

This is why there are so many form factors and 'choice'.

As an artist, I tend to lean towards the Slates, even back in the TabletPC days. Nothing beats drawing with natural media software on a well designed slate with a good digitizer.

Jarrichvdv said,
Surface Pro is a real nice laptop with all the benefits of a tablet.

Except I like to use a laptop in my lap while typing and these don't appear to do that well.

It's like buying a TV at Best Buy at a good price and then they try to sell you a $50 cable and a $400 wall mount. At least these have card slots so you're not as ripped off as buying Apple.

Cyborg_X said,
$500 to go from 256GB to 512GB is a rip
The market has said otherwise. I plan on buying a 512gb as soon as I can get some hand time with the new covers.

Hahaiah said,
WC Fields would agree with your market analysis. Those without pom poms see it as gouging plain and simple.
Gouging? Is there some supply restriction or increased demand of which MS is taking advantage? Nobody wants these, as is said by those without pom poms. MS has extra supply due to that lacking demand, as is said by those without pom poms. So surely, they aren't gouging anybody.

Hahaiah said,
...Those without pom poms see it as gouging plain and simple.

Yet those drinking haterade sees it otherwise right?

They're gouging the few that actually are interested because they know they'll pay it. Not the first company to do so. At least this is a halfway decent machine.

Gouging only applies to over charging for life necessities during times of severe supply restriction such as after a natural disaster. It certainly doesn't apply to luxury items.

Hahaiah said,
They're gouging the few that actually are interested because they know they'll pay it. Not the first company to do so. At least this is a halfway decent machine.
You misundertand price, value, opportunity costs, and alternative uses. Each device on the production line that comes out with a 512 could be coming off with a different sized storage device. For them to *risk* producing the 512, one that obviously will be at a lower demand they must offset that risk with higher reward (profit). They could choose a sweet spot and sell them all at a single size, probably a 128 or 256 or thereabouts. But if someone wants them to reserve those other parts for them with a 512 machine they pay a premium as incentive to MS to produce them and risk them sitting on a shelf for a longer period of time.

In the end it's not the cost of the hard-drive that drives the cost up of the device. It's also paying MS to risk producing those machines that will be in lower demand than the others when the exact same parts are at play.

It would also do you well to read up on Subjective theory of value: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subjective_theory_of_value

Spicoli said,
Gouging only applies to over charging for life necessities during times of severe supply restriction such as after a natural disaster. It certainly doesn't apply to luxury items.
Unfortunately "gouging" laws reduce mute the supply and demand message to the market place usually prolonging the time to get supplies into an inhospitable are inaccessible zone Sure makes for great tv and politics though.

Could you swap the hard drives by yourself? Guess IFixit has a bad rating for that and makes it nearly impossible to do it yourself

-adrian- said,
Could you swap the hard drives by yourself? Guess IFixit has a bad rating for that and makes it nearly impossible to do it yourself

There is no hard drive, this is flash, and it might be soldered to the main board so there is no upgrade ability.. the first surface used 1.8" micro pci cards? I think it was so it was semi-upgradable (not easy to get inside) this one who knows what they did?

-adrian- said,
Well SSD is commonly known as a hard drive as well even though there is no "disk" spinning inside

Common people are horribly wrong.

It was nearly impossible on the original Surface Pro. Tons of glue and a huge possibility of breaking something.

-adrian- said,
Well SSD is commonly known as a hard drive as well even though there is no "disk" spinning inside

HDD = Mechanical hard disk drive... SSD = Solid State Disk... never should it be "commonly known as" a hard drive they are two completely different things, they are drives in the end but different types of drives.... that's getting up there with people calling their computer a "hard drive"... aka "Turn on the hard drive!"

-adrian- said,
Thanks for educating me. btw the SSD is not a disk but a drive solid-state drive

eh, not quite correct... solid-state drive (SSD) (also known as a solid-state disk)

neufuse said,

HDD = Mechanical hard disk drive... SSD = Solid State Disk... never should it be "commonly known as" a hard drive they are two completely different things, they are drives in the end but different types of drives.... that's getting up there with people calling their computer a "hard drive"... aka "Turn on the hard drive!"

Wow, "They are two completely different things" except that they are not and actually serve the same purpose. Great rant.