Microsoft Surface running into chassis manufacturing issues?

A new report indicates Microsoft's chassis supply chain partner is having trouble manufacturing the tablet's magnesium chassis at the rate Microsoft demands. According to the report, Microsoft is working with a "second-tier" manufacturer, which is unable to manufacture the case at a fast pace.

DigiTimes cites sources in Microsoft's supply chain, saying the Chinese manufacturer of the chassis is unable to maintain the high yield rate Microsoft requires for mass production. According to the report, Microsoft had originally planned on using a magnesium-aluminum chassis in its Surface tablets, but the "limited capacity" of the chassis manufacturer forced the company to use a magnesium chassis with a MegVapor treatment.

Microsoft is paying close attention to the Chinese manufacturer to ensure it can maintain a sufficient output, the report states. Microsoft is reportedly hoping to have up to five million Surface tablets manufactured by the end of the year. The company had previously inquired with several other metal chassis manufacturers before settling on the current Chinese manufacturer, according to the report.

The Windows RT Surface tablet is expected to launch alongside Windows 8, which was today revealed to launch sometime in October. A Windows 8 version of the tablet, Surface Pro, will launch three months after the Windows RT version. Microsoft's tablet is expected to be the only Windows RT tablet available at launch; HP recently announced it would not have a Windows RT tablet ready when Microsoft's new operating system launches later this year.

Source: DigiTimes

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So Microsoft's plan to use a new mold composite technology was the result of them not being able to find a more traditional MFR process?

Even though the NEW composite technology has lower yields?


Um, this is the exact opposite of logic and reality.

So are we to expect to buy lower quality Microsoft Surfaces? I'm gonna get the Pro version regardless, but i hope they don't disappoint me with lowering the quality.


Also, anybody know if Gorilla Glass 2.0 scratches easily?

[quote=
Also, anybody know if Gorilla Glass 2.0 scratches easily?[/quote]

Hey, Gorilla Glass stands already for scratch free. So version 2.0 would naturally be even better than version 1.0, since we don't go backwards in technology inventions, wouldn't you agree?

[quote=
Also, anybody know if Gorilla Glass 2.0 scratches easily?[/quote]

Hey, Gorilla Glass stands already for scratch free. So version 2.0 would naturally be even better than version 1.0, since we don't go backwards in technology inventions, wouldn't you agree?

Wait... nobody knew one thing about Surface before the surprise announcement back a few weeks ago. Now Digitimes knows that there are manufacturing issues ?

Are you kidding me?

Yeah, I am sure Microsoft will sort it out just fine. And besides, anything reported by DigiTimes and their "reliable sources" should be taken with a huge grain of salt...

So, let me get this straight. They didn't choose a magnesium-aluminium chassis because of the capacity of manufacturer, and chose MegVapor instead, which has a low yield rate. Isn't this a weird choice to do? Also, this MegVapor process is the same one they mentioned during the presentation right (MS called VaporMG at the time)?

georgevella said,
So, let me get this straight. They didn't choose a magnesium-aluminium chassis because of the capacity of manufacturer, and chose MegVapor instead, which has a low yield rate. Isn't this a weird choice to do? Also, this MegVapor process is the same one they mentioned during the presentation right (MS called VaporMG at the time)?

Could someone eleborate on this please. I would also like to know.

eddman said,
Companies run into manufacturing problems all the time. It's no big deal. I'm sure they'll fix it soon.

Indeed. Anyone who doesn't know this doesn't know anyone who has worked in manufacturing. Stuff happens all the time, even in routinely made products.

sava700 said,
Plenty of people in the USA that need work... why not open a facility here to make them?

Do you have any idea how much an average chinese worker makes compared to an american?

MrBurrrns said,

Do you have any idea how much an average chinese worker makes compared to an american?

$15/day vs ... in this sort of manufacturing ... $20/hour?

sava700 said,
Plenty of people in the USA that need work... why not open a facility here to make them?

People in the US don't need work so desperately that they would be willing to accept the wage chinese earn.

andrewbares said,

People in the US don't need work so desperately that they would be willing to accept the wage chinese earn.


Strangely enough, people and Microsoft in this case need the increased build quality and reliability. You can only get that by paying more for everything in the production line.

Look how far Google has gone on build quality with the Nexus Q by manufacturing in the US. Companies need to stop producing Chinese toys and start building serious quality products.

gonchuki said,

Strangely enough, people and Microsoft in this case need the increased build quality and reliability. You can only get that by paying more for everything in the production line.

Look how far Google has gone on build quality with the Nexus Q by manufacturing in the US. Companies need to stop producing Chinese toys and start building serious quality products.


manufacturing products is slowly moving back to the west. Problem the US has however, is it doesnt have a relative poor eastern europe like we do
as currently its cheaper to produce in lets say, poland then in china due to all the added costs (shipping etc is not cheap either ) and easier to, as its closer and keeps money and the work within the EU

It seems that every large scale launch of a new product almost always has "manufacturing problems" that will affect volume expectations. Look back a few months (March) and you'll see the same "manufacturing problems" announcement for the Galaxy S III, which has now miraculously sold near 10 million units. <trollface.jpg> Problem?

Sometimes I wonder if press releases related to these so called "problems" are nothing more than PR moves to stir demand/hype. Everyone knows artificial shortages increase demand -- i.e. Xbox / PS3 release circa 2005.

ahinson said,
It seems that every large scale launch of a new product almost always has "manufacturing problems" that will affect volume expectations. Look back a few months (March) and you'll see the same "manufacturing problems" announcement for the Galaxy S III, which has now miraculously sold near 10 million units. <trollface.jpg> Problem?

Sometimes I wonder if press releases related to these so called "problems" are nothing more than PR moves to stir demand/hype. Everyone knows artificial shortages increase demand -- i.e. Xbox / PS3 release circa 2005.

The Galaxy S III had 9 million orders from carriers when that story was announced in March. Hard to sell a product that hasn't been released.

dagamer34 said,

The Galaxy S III had 9 million orders from carriers when that story was announced in March. Hard to sell a product that hasn't been released.

Well, we don't know how many pre-orders MS might have taken from vendors because they haven't released that, but we do know it's unreleased and cannot be sold at this point as well -- so its hard to sell as well.

ahinson said,
It seems that every large scale launch of a new product almost always has "manufacturing problems" that will affect volume expectations.

It's free advertising, why wouldn't they take advantage of that??

primexx said,
as long as they don't sacrifice quality

Agreed, If supply is low then I'll just wait a bit longer to get one, heh.

primexx said,
as long as they don't sacrifice quality

Chinese are infamous for cutting the corner. hope it won't happen for surface since I am planning to buy one.

S3P€hR said,

Chinese are infamous for cutting the corner. hope it won't happen for surface since I am planning to buy one.

Well, that is unfair to say, as there are plenty of items manufactured in China that are high quality. Apple products are examples. The thing is that if you provide strict guidelines for a product, they will stick to it.

S3P€hR said,

Chinese are infamous for cutting the corner. hope it won't happen for surface since I am planning to buy one.

It depends by what kind of quality control policies you arrange with the manufacturer......

primexx said,
as long as they don't sacrifice quality

Agree, i dont mind sold out for some time as long as in the end i get the good quality hardware!

The word is "problem" not "issue." When are people going to learn the big difference between a problem and an issue. Oooops, one must be politically correct.

TsarNikky said,
The word is "problem" not "issue." When are people going to learn the big difference between a problem and an issue. Oooops, one must be politically correct.

Standard English is defined by how it is used by the majority of people; not by enforced definitions. This has nothing to do with political correctness. The nouns "problem" and "issue" have become mostly interchangeable these days, and only have slightly different connotations.

TsarNikky said,
The word is "problem" not "issue." When are people going to learn the big difference between a problem and an issue. Oooops, one must be politically correct.

What the hell are you babbling on about? If you are trying to be the grammar police, you fail because 'problem' and 'issue' are synonymous.

Issue means something that's in dispute that may potentially be a problem. The report says that they aren't sure yet whether it will be a problem for them, since they might be able to manufacture the needed chassis after all.

Sounds right.

But no, they aren't interchangeable words. And the majority of people are lazy in how they talk. But I don't see the issue here.