Microsoft Surface takes a licking and keeps on filming

Microsoft has made much of the fact that its upcoming Windows RT-based Surface tablet is well made. Indeed, Steven Sinofsky, the head of the company's Windows division, tweeted pictures of himself riding the Surface as if it were a skateboard earlier this week.

Today, Microsoft showed off just how tough the Surface tablet is via a new video posted on its YouTube page. The video was taken earlier this week as part of the company's top secret press event for the tablet at its Reliability Lab in Redmond Washington.

The front facing camera was shooting video during the test, which involved dropping the Surface 30 inches onto a hardwood flood. As you can see from the short clip, the Surface keeps filming its own drop with no problems at all. The Next Web reports, via their first hand account, that there was no damage done to the Surface as a result of the test.

As we have reported before, Microsoft went with Vapor Magnesium for the case of the tablet, along with Gorilla Glass 2.0 for the Surface touch screen. 

Source: Surface YouTube page

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All the test confirms is that, whoever want to smash contest between iPad and surface to each other and the iPad will lose and then.... Smack the head of the ppl who owns the iPad

Panda X said,
Can't they make it record in a more decent aspect ratio?

I don't see anything wrong with the aspect ratio. The problem is that the device is rotated 90 degrees from the angle you'd normally hold it.

You'd see this on every camera.

rfirth said,

I don't see anything wrong with the aspect ratio. The problem is that the device is rotated 90 degrees from the angle you'd normally hold it.

You'd see this on every camera.

Just because you see it on every phone's camera, doesn't mean that a bikini strip video width is decent. And that certainly doesn't look like 9:16. I would have thought by now a solution would have come forward to record at a decent aspect ratio despite the way you hold the device since it seems that the camera is the second most important feature on phones and tablets these days.

I see It's lab is located at Microsoft Studio B. any info on MS Studio A, C. D, E, F, G & H?

Edited by calimike, Oct 19 2012, 9:02pm :

The video quality is really nice on that video, and I bet it won't blend. I'm sure youtube will take care of the frisbee tests as well.

Dashel said,
Gorilla Glass is amazing.

Not so amazing when you keep seeing one SGS3 after another (supposedly using GG2) with cracked glass...

-=MagMan=- said,

Not so amazing when you keep seeing one SGS3 after another (supposedly using GG2) with cracked glass...

I hear gorilla glass 2 isn't as indestructible. Maybe they should have stuck with the first version.

KSib said,

I hear gorilla glass 2 isn't as indestructible. Maybe they should have stuck with the first version.

They are using GS2 because it is much thinner which has approximately the same survivability.

Durability is something the iPad really fails at. The aluminium back is so incredibly sensitive to dents it's not even funny anymore.

My iPad 1 had a ding in it from the first day. I threw it onto a very well padded passenger seat - just a gentle toss onto a soft surface.

I had a total of five iPad 2s. The first four all got dents in them because of the most smallest of accidents. Fortunately they all suffered from the yellow tint issue so I had a reason to return them. Which I did.

The aluminum used for the iPad 2 and 3 seems like wax at times.

Simon said,
My iPad 1 had a ding in it from the first day. I threw it onto a very well padded passenger seat - just a gentle toss onto a soft surface.

I call complete BS on these fragile claims... I've had the iPad 1 and 3, both were dropped on items much harder than chairs and padded cushions, with no "dents", just some minor scratching.

Remember, Aluminium is not the strongest of metals, but the iPad's are no slouches when it comes to the strength of the frames.

-=MagMan=- said,

I call complete BS on these fragile claims... I've had the iPad 1 and 3, both were dropped on items much harder than chairs and padded cushions, with no "dents", just some minor scratching.

Of course whatever you'd like: We're imagining those dents, okay?

-=MagMan=- said,

I call complete BS on these fragile claims... I've had the iPad 1 and 3, both were dropped on items much harder than chairs and padded cushions, with no "dents", just some minor scratching.

Remember, Aluminium is not the strongest of metals, but the iPad's are no slouches when it comes to the strength of the frames.

Depending on the Alloy, Aluminum often is stronger than Steel. This is why Aluminum is engineered in designs thinner than steel. However, cheaper Alloys that are put into the thinner designs do not hold up well.

Aluminum is not as Stiff as Steel, which is why it is normally a bad design in anything that is cosmetic, as it dents/dings far easier.

The reason Apple 'brands' Aluminum in their designs as a good thing is rather insane, as a hard plastic would have the same weight to strength, and not be prone to dents and blemishes.

Apple also does not use the stronger Aluminum Alloys, like "aircraft" tempered T6, so they are not even trying to be consistent in build quality with their own design that would require this alloy to be feasible in the iPad and Macbook constructions.

Aluminum is also far more expensive to produce than Steel (if you are a green person, it is a major concern).

Apple is cheap, they design the casing for the higher quality alloy, but do not use it in general production.

Additionally there is a marked difference in strength between Aluminum or Steel and Vapor Magnesium molds. There is a reason Microsoft is using this new technology and why they are trying to get other MFRs to create stronger tablets with it as well.

In case you think Microsoft's push for Vapor Mag is marketing or hyperbole, remember they are the first ones to have used Gorilla Glass in a production device, called the ZuneHD. It too was a great technology, but not getting the attention it deserved because of the cost and 'scratch resistent' was good enough for Apple and other device MFRs.

It woke up the world, as people saw that scratch-proof was possible on a glass touch display, and sparked numerous Youtube videos of people doing horrible things to a ZuneHD trying to get a visible scratch on the screen.

Even several years later, the Apple Gorilla Glass knockoff in the iPhone had the hardness, but not the flexibility, which is why they don't scratch so easily, instead they shatter.

Always looks good, but these lab conditions are in no way really reflective of the real world. All of these devices keep up really well in lab tests, but when the meet the world they get snapped back into reality.

A decent drop test would be to drop it onto jagged concrete, for instance, and ensure it hit the glass first or a long side and not a corner... If you want to test realistic drops anyway.

ahhell said,
If you drop a device with a glass display in that sort of you way, you deserve to have it break.

Best test: let it fall from some stairs. My ipod tuch needed a glass replacement but my galaxy tab with gorilla glass didn't. Proof that gorilla glass really works.

Renvy said,

Best test: let it fall from some stairs. My ipod tuch needed a glass replacement but my galaxy tab with gorilla glass didn't. Proof that gorilla glass really works.

How are going to make sure that they drop EXACTLY the same way, with the same force? You can't. Such tests are hardly accurate, and not scientific in any way
There are videos on youtube where people drop a galaxy and an iphone. The result is never the same.

eddman said,

How are going to make sure that they drop EXACTLY the same way, with the same force? You can't. Such tests are hardly accurate, and not scientific in any way
There are videos on youtube where people drop a galaxy and an iphone. The result is never the same.

true, but it's a common fact that the displays of iphones and ipods break more easily then other display's with gorilla glass.

LogicalApex said,
Always looks good, but these lab conditions are in no way really reflective of the real world. All of these devices keep up really well in lab tests, but when the meet the world they get snapped back into reality.

A decent drop test would be to drop it onto jagged concrete, for instance, and ensure it hit the glass first or a long side and not a corner... If you want to test realistic drops anyway.

I've dropped my iPhone 4 so many times. No cracks, it's perfect. But thank goodness I have Best Buy warranty.