Microsoft talks about reading with Word 2013

Microsoft's launch of the preview version of Office 2013 also included a preview of the new version of the popular Word software program. Today, Microsoft went over some more of the new features in Word 2013, specifially how the company has tried to improve how its users read documents.

In a post on the official Word blog, Microsoft says one of the first things the company wanted to do with Word 2013 was to revamp its layout so it looks better when seen on a digital screen. The company said the final result was a flexible layout, stating, "We take the original document and divide it into a series of columns arranged in a horizontal strip. Each column is sized to hit that optimal line length based on the current font and window size."

Zooming on both text and images in Word 2013 also received some attention. For text, the content is scaled so that it reads well no matter what the layout looks like and images such as pictures and charts can also be zoomed in separately.

Microsoft has also added two background colors for reading mode in Word 2013 to make documents stand out more. One is a sepia color and the other turns the background black and the text white for people reading on devices in low light settings.

Other reading features put into Word 2013 include adding a "resume reading feature" that will enable users to start reading again where they left off, even if the document is read on another device. There's also a "Define" feature that offers definitions of a selected word, synonyms for that word and even an audio pronunciation of that word. Word 2013 even allows users to add their own quick annotations to documents.

Source: Official Word blog | Images via Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft on installing Windows 8 to 30,000 employees

Next Story

Apple suspends phone-based password resets

15 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Would it kill them to just provide a plugin for reading Office file formats? I don't see why you should open their behemoth suite every time you want to just read a .doc. Just add a plugin to Explorer and have the doc show up similar to how you can open pictures easily.

LaXu said,
Would it kill them to just provide a plugin for reading Office file formats? I don't see why you should open their behemoth suite every time you want to just read a .doc. Just add a plugin to Explorer and have the doc show up similar to how you can open pictures easily.

Word2013 launchs really fast, much faster than any recent versions of Office.

Also if I'm proof-reading something, I'm not going to waste ink I'll just use the review tools available to me then when I pass it back to the owner/author they can easily see where I've suggested changes.

superconductive said,
Nice, but why put all the effort if 95% of people use word to CREATE documents, not read them

If they create them, doesn't someone (normally) read them?
Or does everyone just create docs for the hell of it?

superconductive said,
Nice, but why put all the effort if 95% of people use word to CREATE documents, not read them

When did proofreading go out the window?

Dot Matrix said,

When did proofreading go out the window?

I think his point is that a lot of people still print their documents to proof them, instead of proofing them directly in Word - and thus it seems unfocused to improve an area of the software that may not get as much use as other parts.

Kaidiir said,

I think his point is that a lot of people still print their documents to proof them, instead of proofing them directly in Word - and thus it seems unfocused to improve an area of the software that may not get as much use as other parts.

I actually wrote an story of about 500 pages in calibri 11, 5 years on it... and I really missed the option to invert the colors, had to change the page color to avoid burning my eyes.

Kaidiir said,

I think his point is that a lot of people still print their documents to proof them, instead of proofing them directly in Word - and thus it seems unfocused to improve an area of the software that may not get as much use as other parts.


Very well said, and so true.

superconductive said,
Nice, but why put all the effort if 95% of people use word to CREATE documents, not read them


But the thing with the new Word is that it can also read PDFs. How often do you edit PDFs? Hence the emphasis on the reading experience.

superconductive said,
Nice, but why put all the effort if 95% of people use word to CREATE documents, not read them

Because else people would complain M$ doesn't care about those 5% that just want to READ their documents! :@

Kaidiir said,

I think his point is that a lot of people still print their documents to proof them, instead of proofing them directly in Word - and thus it seems unfocused to improve an area of the software that may not get as much use as other parts.


Well, perhaps if people print documents just so they can proofread them (thus wasting paper), that is a problem that should be solved. This new feature could perhaps solve that problem. There is no logical reason for a person to "go analogue" to proofread something, when they can proofread it in the software they use to create it, if that software is optimised for proofreading (something this feature may do).

Still nothing more than a text app, what about including videos in the text, to make it more fluid just like html5 embedded video on the ebooks, I mean making it easier for the every day guy to create real interactive documents of the 21st century, instead of outdated two dimensional plain text....I'm not saying MS sucks just the options for creating really interesting documents, since most of us don't have to print them anymore. For your job or a memo any decent email client nowadays includes the basic options to format text.

Meconio said,
Still nothing more than a text app, what about including videos in the text, to make it more fluid just like html5 embedded video on the ebooks, I mean making it easier for the every day guy to create real interactive documents of the 21st century, instead of outdated two dimensional plain text....I'm not saying MS sucks just the options for creating really interesting documents, since most of us don't have to print them anymore. For your job or a memo any decent email client nowadays includes the basic options to format text.

Powerpoint?