Microsoft Technology Brings HD DVD to the Mainstream

Today at the 2007 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), Microsoft Corp. showcased the growing momentum behind HD DVD through its contribution of core technologies. Microsoft helped deliver the highest-quality video with the VC-1 codec, advanced interactivity with HDi™, and a streamlined and affordable platform for player manufacturers through the use of Microsoft® Windows® CE 6.0.

More than 150 HD DVD titles were authored this year with the VC-1 encoding tool, due to its outstanding picture quality. Titles such as "Batman Begins" from Warner Home Video, "King Kong" from Universal Studios Home Entertainment and "Mission: Impossible III" from Paramount Home Entertainment were all recognized by the industry for their reference quality while still allowing more room on the discs for advanced interactive features enabled by Microsoft's HDi technology. As an official SMPTE standard, VC-1 is already the codec of choice for three major Hollywood studios, and it is also being used for digital downloads by leading services including the Xbox Live® Marketplace for high-definition videos.

News source: MS Presspass

As Microsoft's implementation of the interactive layer in HD DVD, HDi immediately began delivering unprecedented and unique experiences for consumers when the format was launched in April 2006. Based on easy-to-program Web standards, HDi provides studios with a familiar and simple development environment, resulting in a digital canvas of unlimited possibilities. With interactivity support mandatory on all HD DVD players, HDi allows for advanced features that can play back on any production HD DVD player or drive. Titles such as "The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift" and "Miami Vice" have already received significant acclaim for their interactive experiences, from picture-in-picture director's commentary to graphical interfaces with tailored movie specifications, all available without stopping the movie playback experience. But these experiences are just the beginning; studios have announced plans to expand their interactive offerings in 2007 with Web-connected interactive experiences. The ability to download new trailers and share favorite bookmarked scenes with other HD DVD owners are just a few of the features.

"With HDi technology, we were able to take a new approach to creating a living-room experience that simply isn't possible with today's DVDs," said Craig Kornblau, president of Universal Studios Home Entertainment. "The HD DVD format is redefining not only what consumers should expect from the next generation of optical formats, but also how content creators approach the creative process of making movies. Microsoft's expertise and contributions will continue to aid in helping us realize the full potential of what can be done."

Also at CES today, Microsoft and Broadcom Corp. announced a joint effort to support a hardware and software reference design for more cost-efficient HD DVD playback. The new platform uses Microsoft Windows CE 6.0 and Broadcom's BCM7440 system-on-chip solution, allowing consumer electronics manufacturers, original design manufacturers and systems integrators to more easily and affordably deliver HD DVD playback. Several of the more innovative consumer electronics companies plan to use this new hardware and software platform to speed the production of HD DVD players, including Lite-On IT Corp., one of the most experienced systems integrators backing high-volume consumer electronics manufacturers, and Zhenjiang Jiangkui Group Co. Ltd./ED Digital, one of the largest, high-volume manufacturers of DVD players in China.

In addition, Microsoft is working with Meridian Audio Ltd. to build high-end HD DVD players for the enthusiast market.

"Our expertise in software, advanced video compression and systems integration is bringing the promise of HD DVD to a wider mainstream consumer audience," said Amir Majidimehr, corporate vice president of the Consumer Media Technology Group at Microsoft. "Heading into 2007, Microsoft's commitment is to help our partners continue to bring the highest-quality content to consumers, help them push the envelope with interactivity, and continue to drive down manufacturing costs."

Microsoft technology is also powering the HDi capabilities in the first and second generation HD DVD players from Toshiba America Inc. and RCA Thomson, and the company continues to work with key software providers, including Sonic Solutions, CyberLink Corp., InterVideo Inc., Ulead Systems Inc. and Nero to allow for seamless playback on a variety of devices from set-top players to laptops and PCs.

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And regarding your post on the porn company: The HD-DVD's were released in 2005 (look it up).

That interview I quoted was from this past summer.

First of all let me just say that companies are jumping from Blu-Ray ship. Some of these were exlusive Blu-Ray and now they are supporting HD-DVD as well. This should tell you something.
HD-DVDs support is not lacking.
HD DVD is promoted by Toshiba, NEC, Sanyo, Microsoft, and Intel as for movie studios, Universal Studios is exclusive, and is non-exclusively backed by Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros. (including subsidiaries HBO[17] and New Line Cinema)[18], Warner Music Group, The Weinstein Company (through Genius Products)[19], Image Entertainment (including Discovery Channel)[20] , Magnolia Pictures[21], Brentwood Home Video, Ryko, Koch/Goldhil Entertainment[22], and Studio Canal.
It is also announced that HP might join HD-DVD soon even though it's in Blu-Ray board. When you are supported by 2 MAJOR companies in the world Intel and Microsoft you can pretty much bet your behind that this format is highly likely to win. Forget others, they are all manufacturers of equipment mostly and have no baring on the success of a format. Companies supporting HD-DVD are solution and service based corporations, they are the ones that push standards not player manufacturers.

Funny post!

First off, show me a company besides LG that is "jumping" to HD DVD. None. Zero. Nada. Besides, LG is supporting Blu-ray and their player cripples HDi support that HD DVD's interactive features depend on.

HD DVD support is pathetic. You list Paramount (also BD) Warner (BD) Weinstein (BD) Image (BD) Magnolia (BD) Brentwood (BD) and the others are not North America.
HP joined both BD and HD DVD late 2005. Of course anyone with as much misinformation would naturally miss this fact as well.
Solution and service based??? Who's going to make the players? The movies? Microsoft doesn't make any hardware of their own, and Intel doesn't either. So far it's been Toshiba, Toshiba, and Toshiba. Oh yeah, almost forgot: Toshiba.

You want solutions? How about TDK. How about Apple, Dell, HP? Drives/writers from BenQ, Pioneer, Plextor, Panasonic, Philips, Sony? Media from TDK, Verbatim, even Memorex? Software support from Roxio, InterVideo, Cyberlink, Ahead, Sonic Solutions, etc?

Players from Panasonic, Sony, Mitsubishi, Sharp, Yamaha, Samsung, Pioneer, Philips, etc.

And the million plus SELLING PlayStation 3, of which 75% surveyed said they would use it to play purchased Blu-ray discs? Reread the articles on CURRENT sales.

Again, support is not the real issue here we are going off-topic, I clearly said why Blu-Ray will fail, I wasn't really mentioning the companies. I'll just tell you this, when EXLUSIVE Blu-Ray companies that you are praising so much realized that HD-DVD is gaining significant momentum they actually started releasing the HD-DVD titles as well, and as I said that means something. And please, show me where it says they sold 1 mill+ consoles PLEASE and who surveyed people who bought consoles that they bought them for Blu-Ray please. Because the highest number I got is around 400k units out of million shipped to the US. If you mean world sales, I can give you that because I'm counting US market only as the most significant one for the format domination.

Lastly, I just saw Blu-Ray declaring victory by themselves hahaha..completely idiotic. When they sell more HD-DVD players, when they sell more titles (even though with such an incredible supporters as you magnificantly praise) then they can declare a victory, otherwise this is just comforting people like you and themselves that they are going somewhere with the format. Blu-Ray will be phased out in the next 2-3 years. You'll see more and more Blu-Ray camp exclusive supporters going after HD-DVD. It's about money dude, and that's exactly why many of the Blu-Ray backers added HD-DVD to their releases.

Here's if you want to educate yourself on the topic of Blu-Ray and HD-DVD read this incredibly well written article

http://www.projectorcentral.com/retailing_HD-DVD_Blu-ray.htm

Stop posting that 6 month old article. It's making you look all the more foolish.

And stop LYING! No Blu-ray backers (studio or CE) have switched to Blu-ray!

PeterTHX said,
Stop posting that 6 month old article. It's making you look all the more foolish.

And stop LYING! No Blu-ray backers (studio or CE) have switched to Blu-ray!

First of all article is 4 months old and NOTHING has changed from then. Blu-Ray hasn't advanced at all except for announcement for the new 50gb disks, so the artcle still stands. It shows you completely ridiculous myths about how Blu-Ray is superior technology and these guys are fairly objective. They are just transfering their experiences and knowledge to the masses. All of their comments are well informed and the writer knows his tech stuff.

And what the hell am i arguing with you for. You just go ahead go buy Blu-Ray and movies, while the rest of us sit nicely and enjoy our 3rd generation HD-DVD players from $199 and movies with superior video encoding while you watch crappy MPEG2 encoded movies, you have maybe 3 movies that are superb quality on Blu-Ray. We'll all be laughing when you decide to through your player and movies to the crapper when you don't have any more stuff to buy for it.

As I wrote above, I'm really done with ya.

As I wrote above, I'm really done with ya.
I can just see Boz as an eight year old in the corner with his fingers in his ears and eyes tightly shut:

"LALALALALALA!!! I'M NOT LISTENING TO YOU!!!!"

First of all article is 4 months old and NOTHING has changed from then

As I wrote in another thread (and which you conveniently forget):

An article from SEPTEMBER, from before:

Panasonic players were available
Pioneer players were available
Philips BD player was available
Sony BD player was available
The PS3 was available
Disney Blu-ray discs were available
Paramount discs were available
Fox discs were available
Warner & Lionsgate with advanced video codecs were available
many new true 1080p displays were available

Already HD DVD has hit the capacity wall with titles "Superman Returns" and "King Kong". "SR" suffers from noticable picture artifacts and "KK" has slim to no extras (the DVD edition had a whole 2nd disc of them).

So again: STOP LYING! You're just making HD DVD (the porno format) look even more pathetic than it is.

1. I'll give you this. However, there seems to be many more companies investing in Blu-Ray.

2. Uh, Universal is the only one strictly on HD-DVD. Sony (obviously), Fox, Disney, Lionsgate, and MGM are BD-exclusive. Paramount and Time Warner are the only ones that release for both. That includes franchies like Spiderman, Pirates of the Carribean, Star Wars, *every freaking Disney movie*, Fox TV series (like 24, Prisonbreak)etc, are BD-exclusive. There's a much wider array of players by many more trusted electronics companies. Don't like Sony? Do you love Toshiba that much, or would you still trust Philips (the people who did the leg-work with Sony on compact discs and DVD's), Pioneer, Mitsubishi, JVC, Samsung, Panasonic, Sharp? Throw in the support from Dell, Apple, Roxio, Intel... Also, can you buy HD-DVD media for use as storage in your PC?

3. LG is crap (according to Consumer Reports), and I that particular player (the $1200 one) plays both formats as well, so it's not helping HD-DVD either.

4. Much better? I just read a review linked from Neowin, from a guy who was comparing the same movie on a PS3 and the MS HD-DVD add-on, who said they were virtually the same. Throw in better extras and lossless audio, I think BD seems to be much better. I haven't seen either side-by-side, I'm using an indepent review here (done at MS offices, BTW). I did hear that first run Blu-Ray wasn't as sharp as the comperable HD-DVD, but that has changed in the last six months.

5. Digital Playground (with 40% marketshare) is in the Blu-ray camp. Also, in 1982, people couldn't download porn on the internet.

Take high-definition video, for example. While mainstream video producers seem content to sit on their hands, waiting for the battle between HD DVD and Blu-ray to take place and name one format as the winner, a number of adult-video companies are already producing and delivering high-definition content to consumers. One of these companies is Digital Playground, whose founder, Joone, is considered one of the leading technical innovators in the industry. I talked with Joone at last year’s CES about the company’s pioneering work with high-definition (HD) video, and this year in Las Vegas I had a chance to sit down with him again to talk about the future direction of HD-content delivery.
..

In the coming format war, Joone favors Blu-ray for a few reasons. First, he points out that Sony will incorporate Blu-ray into PlayStation 3, which should give it good market presence right off the bat. Second, at this time it seems like Blu-ray will have higher capacity than HD DVD -- 25 gigs versus 15 gigs. Joone wants the highest capacity, but not necessarily for the movie itself. "The HD codec is about three times more efficient for compression than the standard-definition codec," he says, meaning that HD DVD’s more limited capacity is still sufficient for the movie. Rather, Joone wants Blu-ray's additional storage capacity so he can include more extra material onto the disc, something Digital Playground already does plenty of with current releases. Blu-ray should allow them to do more -- for more people. But there’s another reason -- perhaps the key reason -- that Joone believes in Blu-ray: "I want Blu-ray to win because it’s the last disc format we’ll see. Blu-ray has enough 'future-proof' to it."

6. In order to get the add-on, you have to buy the 360 first, and an extra $200 for the HD-DVD player, and it's sans HDMI. That's the same cost as the 60GB PS3. So if you're buying it as a player, you're not saving any money. Where MS stands to hurt Blu-ray is with the HD downloads, but with those you don't get "extras". If Sony has sold 1 million PS3's, that's 1 million Blu-Ray players, on top of all the regular BD players sold.

First of all let me just say that companies are jumping from Blu-Ray ship. Some of these were exlusive Blu-Ray and now they are supporting HD-DVD as well. This should tell you something.

HD-DVDs support is not lacking.

HD DVD is promoted by Toshiba, NEC, Sanyo, Microsoft, and Intel as for movie studios, Universal Studios is exclusive, and is non-exclusively backed by Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros. (including subsidiaries HBO[17] and New Line Cinema)[18], Warner Music Group, The Weinstein Company (through Genius Products)[19], Image Entertainment (including Discovery Channel)[20] , Magnolia Pictures[21], Brentwood Home Video, Ryko, Koch/Goldhil Entertainment[22], and Studio Canal.

It is also announced that HP might join HD-DVD soon even though it's in Blu-Ray board. When you are supported by 2 MAJOR companies in the world Intel and Microsoft you can pretty much bet your behind that this format is highly likely to win. Forget others, they are all manufacturers of equipment mostly and have no baring on the success of a format. Companies supporting HD-DVD are solution and service based corporations, they are the ones that push standards not player manufacturers.


LG is crap (according to Consumer Reports), and I that particular player (the $1200 one) plays both formats as well, so it's not helping HD-DVD either.
Consumer Reports is pretty much worthless overall. I have a subscription and I speak from experience. LG was shaky before but they've been releasing better and better stuff past 2 years or so. I would hardly classify them as crap.



4. Much better? I just read a review linked from Neowin, from a guy who was comparing the same movie on a PS3 and the MS HD-DVD add-on, who said they were virtually the same. Throw in better extras and lossless audio, I think BD seems to be much better. I haven't seen either side-by-side, I'm using an indepent review here (done at MS offices, BTW). I did hear that first run Blu-Ray wasn't as sharp as the comperable HD-DVD, but that has changed in the last six months.

Listen, a skewed review on Neowin is not really worth much. I was talking about reputable high-end hifi and video magazines and recognized reviews, so called experts. Look it up. HD-DVD wins all the way. I can post a few links if you'd like. I never said Blu-Ray is going to be bad, but even now it needs some maturing as far as studios and companies encoding.

Digital Playground (with 40% marketshare) is in the Blu-ray camp. Also, in 1982, people couldn't download porn on the internet.
That statement has changed. You quoted an old article. Digital Playground has joined HD-DVD camp. It has released 2 titles that I know of (Pirates and Island of Love 3 or something like that), but I think they are coming up with a few more. Look it up.

6. In order to get the add-on, you have to buy the 360 first, and an extra $200 for the HD-DVD player, and it's sans HDMI. That's the same cost as the 60GB PS3. So if you're buying it as a player, you're not saving any money. Where MS stands to hurt Blu-ray is with the HD downloads, but with those you don't get "extras". If Sony has sold 1 million PS3's, that's 1 million Blu-Ray players, on top of all the regular BD players sold.

That statement must've come from Sony press-release. Do you have any idea how many XBox360s are there out there. I think around 9 million. just take 10% of people that will buy an HD-DVD add-on and it will be more I guarantee it, that's already busting Sony's numbers. It's a ridiculous statement. Second of all, Sony did not SELL 1 million units. It shipped to retail 1 million units, there's a BIG difference. ( Article ). Sony actually sold 197,000 PS3s at the time of the stats were released that's a few weeks into beginning of the sales, now it's around 250,000 units.

Cnet reported around ~200k units at first two weeks. Here's the article from mid-december.
http://blogs.zdnet.com/carroll/?p=1627

Through that time, XBox 360 was sold in the amount of 510k units. So twice the number of PS3s. There's really no comparison about that. But let's not make this console vs console thing.

You gotta double check your info when you post.

People seem to forget that in the Betamax vs VHS war betamax was a technologically better solution however many other factors decide on the prevailing technology. Let me clarify for all you Blu-Ray supporters.

The biggest problem Sony has, is that it has a tendency to push proprietary formats all the time. It's their tradition which will ultimately kill the company. Greed, is good to some extent only if you at least give a chance of choice, in the case of Blu-Ray it's bad greed, like they've done so many times and burned themselves. Let me remind everyone, UMD, mini-disc, betamax and a few others, list goes on. All of these things failed miserably just because of their bad greed. They wanted to completely control it and failed, you can't do this in a competitive world, where user-demand and buying power controls the market. Choice is the key here.

Blu-Ray is indeed slightly better technology, but not necessary better enough to justify completely closed control.
I will tell you why Blu-Ray will fail.

1. Larger manufacturing costs (meaning that factories need to revamp completely their production lines). Economically this is strike one for Blu-Ray. Companies are in the business of making money, if they have to invest a lot to gain minimal benefits, they will definitely choose HD-DVD over Blu-Ray, since HD-DVD doesn't require them to upgrade.

2. Less movies available for Blu-Ray then HD-DVD. Even though some studios are backing it (Blu-Ray) up, don't forget that some of them are also releasing HD-DVD titles in addition to Blu-Ray. This is in one way a good thing for HD-DVD, since they'll be getting those same movies in addition to the movies from studios that support it and essentially HD-DVD came out sooner so it's more tested technology.

3. Much higher cost of manufacturing the optical reader. The fact that Blu-Ray players (1st gen) still cost around $800-$900 despite the 2nd generation coming out, the price is absurdly high. 2nd generation of players is even more expensive. The new LG Blu-Ray player 2nd gen is around $1200. Instead of going down in price, it's going up. Not good for Sony. No matter how good of a technology is, or how much money one makes (and I do make pretty penny), I will go for the thing that is cheaper and offers same quality if not better. On the other hand, 2nd gen HD-DVD players are already on the market for a while and you can get from $299-$599 (for high end) price range.

4. The quality of the high-def titles is much better on HD-DVD then on Blu-Ray. This gap will of course come to equal standing once studios publish a few more movies, however the initial reports from many distinguished web sites and pros is that HD-DVD delivered much better quality of movies in high-def. Personally, I think the quality is/will be the same, however this again goes against Blu-Ray. What exactly are you offering to the consumer besides, slightly bigger capacity of the disk? Nothing really. If Blu-Ray titles looked twice as good as the ones on HD-DVD then everything above could be overlooked, however this will not be the case.

5. Porn industry decides what format will win. As it was the case in the Betamax vs VHS battle where porn industry picked VHS, this is going to be the case again. There are already a few of adult movie companies coming out with HD-DVD versions of their movies like Wicked pictures and Digital Playground.

6. Microsoft is not doing Blu-Ray any favors either. HD-DVD for $200 is going to make a mess for Blu-Ray. Even though PS3 comes with Blu-Ray, the fact that MS is selling this player as an accessory is extremely smart. Most people will actually buy it regardless it will be more expensive that way then top of the line PS3, but just the fact that you have it as a choice gives an ease to a consumer. On the other hand, who wants it will get it, who doesn't have money won't, but the XBox 360 still happily keeps pumping in most people's homes while MS gives a killing blow to PS3 and Blu-Ray.

- I'm in the HD-DVD boot camp, however I'm not single minded, but for so many reasons, I will most likely never buy another Sony product. And believe me when I tell you that I spend a lot on tech equipment as a consumer. If a lot of people similar to me have this same mindset (and I think there are), this is not again good for Sony. Their spyware and Trojan horses and other proprietary stuff was basically the final straw. What I'm trying to say here is that they pretty much blew it in the public eye which has consequences. This will reflect on Blu-Ray and PS3.

Cheers.

Wonderful post? How about completely wrong and misinformed?

1: Manufacturing costs come down. The vast majority of the CE industry has already chosen Blu-ray. All Blu-ray players are sold at profit (with the exception of the PS3). Toshiba, on the other hand, loses money. RCA, which had offered a Toshiba rebadge, has left the market. With your foward thinking, we should all be playing Super Video CDs right now because it didn't make folks upgrade the cost to DVD over CDs back in 1997.

2: Less movies? Are you serious? Disney, Fox, MGM, Sony/Columbia, and Lions Gate are ramping up production. At CES right now several high profile titles have been announced, and ALREADY there are more available Blu-ray film purchases available than HD DVD. This gap will only widen.

3: The same optical readers power HD DVD players. Your "point" is pure and simple FUD. Show me a $299 HD DVD player while you're at it. The HD-X2 is $999. The $499 A2 actually trims features from the previous version!
Meanwhile, the PS3 is $499

4: The quality is the SAME or now even better averaged on review sites for Blu-ray. Now that the hand picked launch titles are out for HD DVD they resort to catalog remasters that look little better than their DVD counterparts. Slightly bigger capacity? A SINGLE layer BD (25GB) is 5GB smaller than a DUAL LAYER HD DVD (30GB). 80% is slight in HD DVD land I guess. Already you are seeing HD DVD films such as "Spartacus" with absolutely no extras (no room) or titles like "Superman Returns" soft with posturization artifacts due to excessive compression.

5: Porn is an absolute non factor in the internet age. I can get more free porn from a Google Search than plunking down $40 for some HD version. Several studios have commited to Blu-ray anyway (such as Vivid).

6: The HD DVD *add on* for the 360 is gathering dust on retailer shelves. Go into any Gamestop, EB Games, Best Buy, Circuit City, etc...you'll have no trouble finding them. Try doing the same for a PS3.

You are in the HD DVD camp due to ignorance and an irrational hatred of Sony. What about Panasonic? Hitachi? Samsung? Sharp? Pioneer? Mitsubishi? Yamaha? Philips? All exclusively Blu-ray companies.

Toshiba announced that the combined total sales of HD DVD (being stand alone players, add ons for the 360, and laptop/desktop drives) was 175,000 for May 2006 to Jan 2007. Absolutely pathetic number compared to the 1.1 MILLION sold PlayStation 3s alone. Blu-ray software sales are 3.5 to 1 over HD DVD.

You have NO studio defections to HD DVD. Universal, the lone HD DVD studio holdout, will not announce any new titles at CES. The other supporting studios, Warner and Paramount, announced a smattering of HD DVD upcoming releases...and guess what? They announced the exact same titles the next day for Blu-ray.
The LG combo player is fully featured Blu-ray and crippled (no HDi support) HD DVD.
All HD DVD has to look foward to is cheap china made junk from Shinco & Venturer. Wooo.

I don't care about legal movies so I'm on Blu-ray side. I want more space on discs for backup, etc.
But while what PeterTHX said can be true, Boz still wins in being open-minded.

PeterTHX said,
Wonderful post? How about completely wrong and misinformed?

1: Manufacturing costs come down. The vast majority of the CE industry has already chosen Blu-ray. All Blu-ray players are sold at profit (with the exception of the PS3). Toshiba, on the other hand, loses money. RCA, which had offered a Toshiba rebadge, has left the market. With your foward thinking, we should all be playing Super Video CDs right now because it didn't make folks upgrade the cost to DVD over CDs back in 1997.

2: Less movies? Are you serious? Disney, Fox, MGM, Sony/Columbia, and Lions Gate are ramping up production. At CES right now several high profile titles have been announced, and ALREADY there are more available Blu-ray film purchases available than HD DVD. This gap will only widen.

3: The same optical readers power HD DVD players. Your "point" is pure and simple FUD. Show me a $299 HD DVD player while you're at it. The HD-X2 is $999. The $499 A2 actually trims features from the previous version!
Meanwhile, the PS3 is $499

4: The quality is the SAME or now even better averaged on review sites for Blu-ray. Now that the hand picked launch titles are out for HD DVD they resort to catalog remasters that look little better than their DVD counterparts. Slightly bigger capacity? A SINGLE layer BD (25GB) is 5GB smaller than a DUAL LAYER HD DVD (30GB). 80% is slight in HD DVD land I guess. Already you are seeing HD DVD films such as "Spartacus" with absolutely no extras (no room) or titles like "Superman Returns" soft with posturization artifacts due to excessive compression.

5: Porn is an absolute non factor in the internet age. I can get more free porn from a Google Search than plunking down $40 for some HD version. Several studios have commited to Blu-ray anyway (such as Vivid).

6: The HD DVD *add on* for the 360 is gathering dust on retailer shelves. Go into any Gamestop, EB Games, Best Buy, Circuit City, etc...you'll have no trouble finding them. Try doing the same for a PS3.

You are in the HD DVD camp due to ignorance and an irrational hatred of Sony. What about Panasonic? Hitachi? Samsung? Sharp? Pioneer? Mitsubishi? Yamaha? Philips? All exclusively Blu-ray companies.

Toshiba announced that the combined total sales of HD DVD (being stand alone players, add ons for the 360, and laptop/desktop drives) was 175,000 for May 2006 to Jan 2007. Absolutely pathetic number compared to the 1.1 MILLION sold PlayStation 3s alone. Blu-ray software sales are 3.5 to 1 over HD DVD.

You have NO studio defections to HD DVD. Universal, the lone HD DVD studio holdout, will not announce any new titles at CES. The other supporting studios, Warner and Paramount, announced a smattering of HD DVD upcoming releases...and guess what? They announced the exact same titles the next day for Blu-ray.
The LG combo player is fully featured Blu-ray and crippled (no HDi support) HD DVD.
All HD DVD has to look foward to is cheap china made junk from Shinco & Venturer. Wooo.


Dude where do you get your information? From Sony press releases? What a hell.

- Blu-Ray PRODUCTION costs are HIGHER, this is why everything costs more, from disks to players. EVERYTHING.

- HD-DVD is backwards compatible, that means that when you get a movie you can play it in regular DVD player as well as HD-DVD player. Do that with Blu-Ray please.

- Here's what you have for HD-DVD players since you are only reading Sony press releases:
- Xbox 360 HD-DVD ($199), Toshiba goes from $299 to $599 (for high end). I'll quote the announcement for you:

Toshiba is taking the gloves off next week at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, where the company might introduce a third line of HD DVD players that will be even cheaper than its current versions. Toshiba chief Yoshihide Fujii offers this tantalizing hint: "At first I thought the price threshold is $499. Maybe coming next is $399 and after that is $299."
This $299 home HD-DVD player is actually a weaker version but nonetheless plays HD-DVD titles in all it's glory.

- Porn is always a factor, but I'll give you that. Btw, VIVID didn't join Blu-Ray, their announcement was that they will wait.

-

Toshiba announced that the combined total sales of HD DVD (being stand alone players, add ons for the 360, and laptop/desktop drives) was 175,000 for May 2006 to Jan 2007. Absolutely pathetic number compared to the 1.1 MILLION sold PlayStation 3s alone. Blu-ray software sales are 3.5 to 1 over HD DVD.

Where do you get this information please? Show me those statistics please. Again Sony DID NOT SELL million units in the US. Give me a reputable source that confirms it and I'll be more prone to believe it. There are several companies that are selling HD-DVD drives in their laptops and so on, including HP, Acer and and Toshiba of course as a few, I think there's a few more brands as well. I only know about Sony's laptops that have Blu-Ray. What's Blu-Ray software sales please? I got Cyberlink HD-DVD player on my laptop and I know people are still having problems playing BDs on their blu-ray drives on PCs.

- HD-DVD add-on is collecting dust?!?! HAHAHAHAH, you live in denial my friend. I can tell you freely that PS3s are collecting dust, sales for HD-DVD XBox360 add-on, XBox 360 and Wii are flying off the shelves.

- With all the studios and companies backing Blu-Ray up I only saw Samsung and Sony blu-ray players. Others are just coming out, and that's mostly because they wanted to do dual formats. It's all about the money. Warner too started going that route as well. There's a lot more movie titles for HD-DVD and I actually keep track of that whenever I'm at the electronics store. HD-DVD part of their movie selection is STACKED with movies while blu-ray has only maybe 4-5 shelves and that's mostly the ones that were marked CRAP by many reviews. Newer titles are shining for Blu-Ray but overall it's a bad picture for the amount of movies you can get on Blu-Ray. Announcements and announcements don't mean squat. We are talking about present. Warner and Paramount are showing you exactly that, they are releasing HD-DVD movies first, then Blu-ray and they are the exact same movies, I don't know what you're talking about.

You are in the HD DVD camp due to ignorance and an irrational hatred of Sony. What about Panasonic? Hitachi? Samsung? Sharp? Pioneer? Mitsubishi? Yamaha? Philips? All exclusively Blu-ray companies.

Irrational hatred? If you want to be presented with propriatery format that they will use to milk your money without any alternative and install spyware and other crap to keep tabs on you well you are the one who is irrational. And all these companies are not really shining in their support for Blu-Ray. Only Samsung has shown some initiative, others NOT SO BLOODY MUCH, I'll tell you that. They are all holding up to see what's going on. The fact that their players are not selling at $999 (which is really an amazing and puzzling questions for me *sarcasm*) is something that will eventually make them switch to HD-DVD. Just watch.

I'll tell you one thing. Stop being a pawn and when you spread rumors and Sony press releases quote and link valid articles. Everything that I said I can post URLs from reputable sources, your information is half-arsed and incorrect with the intention to poison peoples opinions.

And as I stated below, here's if you want to educate yourself on the topic of Blu-Ray and HD-DVD read this incredibly well written article, that shows you the type of dirty play that all these companies are doing, including the retail stores. This is another reason why Blu-Ray will fail. They just can't sell $999 players.

http://www.projectorcentral.com/retailing_HD-DVD_Blu-ray.htm

Cheers.

YOur post is littered with such innacuracies it's hard to know where to begin:

HD DVD is NOT backwards compatible: most discs are NOT combo discs. The ones that ARE have specific sides for each format. It's occurred to me you have neither format. I have BOTH.

Your projectorcentral article is from September 1996. What's next? An article from 2005 showing AMD processors are faster than Intel?

BDs not in stock and HD DVDs are? Well that's because they are SELLING and not sitting on shelves.

CES2007 was a DISASTER for HD DVD. No major companies defected from Blu-ray. No studio support. Titles from Warner & Paramount announced for BOTH formats. Crippled LG player. Crap companies from China (Shinsonic, Venturer) or non-mainstream (Meridian & Onkyo, good quality but not well known) the only new CE support. Universal, the ONLY HD DVD exclusive studio not announcing their disc lineup.

And finally, a grand total of 175,000 players (stand alone, 360 add on, desktop/laptop drives) sold in all of 2006.

Try and spin that all you want. That pathetic figure is from TOSHIBA themselves.

PeterTHX said,
YOur post is littered with such innacuracies it's hard to know where to begin:

HD DVD is NOT backwards compatible: most discs are NOT combo discs. The ones that ARE have specific sides for each format. It's occurred to me you have neither format. I have BOTH.

Your projectorcentral article is from September 1996. What's next? An article from 2005 showing AMD processors are faster than Intel?

BDs not in stock and HD DVDs are? Well that's because they are SELLING and not sitting on shelves.

CES2007 was a DISASTER for HD DVD. No major companies defected from Blu-ray. No studio support. Titles from Warner & Paramount announced for BOTH formats. Crippled LG player. Crap companies from China (Shinsonic, Venturer) or non-mainstream (Meridian & Onkyo, good quality but not well known) the only new CE support. Universal, the ONLY HD DVD exclusive studio not announcing their disc lineup.

And finally, a grand total of 175,000 players (stand alone, 360 add on, desktop/laptop drives) sold in all of 2006.

Try and spin that all you want. That pathetic figure is from TOSHIBA themselves.

- What the hell are you talking about. I have an HD-DVD player and regular DVD players and you are right not all disks leverage the technology to the fullest but I personally have several titles that play in my regular DVD player. It's double sided. This is a choice from that someone who makes the disk. So PLEASE STOP SPECULATING. YOu are the one who is spreading false information. Blu-Ray at the present moment CANNOT do that.

- Projector Central article is from Sept. 2006, you seem to have problems with your eyesight. That would explain your gross disinformation and false statements.

- BDs are NOT in Stock because by latest numbers Sony has 122 titles out in total with addition ~30 coming out while HD-DVD has ~170 and pretty much the same number is coming out (so it means new ~30 ones) that will most likely take them to over 200 titles. That's 50 titles more if you can't count. I don't know ANYONE who has Blu-Ray and I know at least 5 people in my surrounding that have HD-DVD player and movies, and no, I didn't convince them, they got it before I did.

- Again, what the hell are you talking about. Just look at the news from CNET coverage here on Neowin. HD-DVD has all the spotlight right now. From interactive features and technology that will completely change viewing experience shown by Microsoft to all new line-up of HD-DVD players and companies more and more integrating HD-DVD support like HP, Acer, Asus and many others. It's so ridiculous that Sony doesn't know what else to do but go with press releases that they won hahhaha..what A JOKE and they have no facts whatsoever, they just say Blu-Ray WON haahah..pathetic. Studios are RELEASING HD-DVDs in addition to their original plans to release only Blu-Ray. What reality do you live in?!

I'm done with this discussion, you are repeating some half-arsed info that you picked up from Sony press releases, you are not backing up ANYTHING you are screaming about with relevant articles or at least opinions (and trust me I know why, because THERE AREN'T ANY). There's nothing to discuss. Just look at the news around you, everywhere you look it's HD-DVD this, HD-DVD that in utmost positive light (price, technology, new 60gb disk on one side etc etc), while you hear only bad news about Blu-Ray (the latest is that Blu-Ray players won't play some Blu-Ray movies and that they only play on PS3), but you've decided to just go like a zombie after your Sony. I support HD-DVD, yes, but I am also very objective at looking at facts and news from ALL sources. I bet you don't even have a Blu-Ray player or movies.

We're done.

LOL! So this:

HD-DVD is backwards compatible, that means that when you get a movie you can play it in regular DVD player as well as HD-DVD player.
Becomes this:

have an HD-DVD player and regular DVD players and you are right not all disks leverage the technology to the fullest but I personally have several titles that play in my regular DVD player

So, not ALL titles, eh? So backwards compatibility is somewhat diminished. Explain to me why someone would play $40 to buy a title they may use in the future? Or that the majority of users HATE the combo discs?

Studios are RELEASING HD-DVDs in addition to their original plans to release only Blu-Ray
Um, name ONE studio besides the porn ones. One. It's should be easy, mr HD DUD man.

I'm done with this discussion

Well, I'll miss the comedy of your lies and deceptions. Just keep repeating to yourself 175,000 is greater than one million, 175k>1,000,000...

From the linked-to article in your link:

According to DSG International, which owns PC World, about 15 per cent of PCs sold at present in Britain use digital connections, but that number is expected to grow.

Virtually none of the PCs that use a digital connection have HDCP. “It’s up to the content providers to set the level of protection that Vista applies, but they’re likely to be pretty firm on the need to use high-definition content protection [HDCP]when using a digital connection,” Mr Marsh said. “At the moment HD DVD and Blu-ray Discs certainly require such protection.”

Mr Marsh added that computers with built-in HDCP protection — which could play such discs — were being phased in, but that, in the meantime, Microsoft was obliged to ensure that the studios’ content was being used securely.

Computers using an analog connection will not be affected and the requirement does not apply to regular DVDs.


So, about 15% of currently-sold PCs in the UK are DVI. Of these, only a small fraction have HDCP ability?
But then, it seems to say analog VGA connections are not affected. So, do these allow High Def playback?

Are we looking at 85% VGA connections playing just fine, and most of the 15% DVI will have problems?

Could be an issue for many people, but hardly affects "most PCs", as you claimed.

P.S. DRM is evil.

markjensen said,
So, about 15% of currently-sold PCs in the UK are DVI. Of these, only a small fraction have HDCP ability?
But then, it seems to say analog VGA connections are not affected. So, do these allow High Def playback?

Are we looking at 85% VGA connections playing just fine, and most of the 15% DVI will have problems?

Could be an issue for many people, but hardly affects "most PCs", as you claimed.

P.S. DRM is evil. :)


well what I claimed is that analog connection won't play HD content at all.... so only the small fraction having full DHCP system will....

At the CES did Microsoft Corp. also showcase the DRM 'features' that are embedded in HDi technology? When are these companies going to become consumer friendly?

If you ask a general member of the public (i.e. not someone who you'd class as tech savvy) which of the two they're most likely to 'adopt' as the new format, Blu-Ray or HD-DVD, then I think most people would say HD-DVD, because its sounds most like something they already have, DVD. It makes it seem like a safer bet, because many will see it as an extension to DVD, whereas Blu-Ray sounds a bit more 'risky'.

Um, crappy? If anything, Blu-ray is too good for its own good, if you see what I mean.

The only non-economical thing that's "crappier" I can think of right now with Blu-rays is that they tend to have DVD-like durability, where HD-DVD is supposedly a bit better than that. But if you talk capacity and data transfer rates, Blu-ray is obviously far better.