Microsoft: There are several issues in Windows 8.1 with some mice in games


Metro 2033 is one of the games affected by the Windows 8.1 mouse lag issue.

Soon after Windows 8.1 launched in October, many users noticed that that playing some games with certain mouse products was causing a great deal of lag. At the time, Microsoft did not offer any comments on the matter, but a recent post on their support forums indicates they are aware of "several different issues" with using some mice in Windows 8.1.

The support forum post states that one of the problems is that the mouse cursor seems to move quickly back and forward when moving inside a game. Microsoft says, "This occurs in some games because Windows 8.1 handles the games’ checks for the mouse status differently." Another problem is when users turn off mouse acceleration "to make the distance on the screen match the distance you move the mouse". Microsoft says this may no longer work with Windows 8.1. Finally, the Polling Rate on some mice products may have a lower than normal reporting frequency.

The forum post indicates that Microsoft is looking into a fix for all of these problems but does not yet have a date when they will be implemented. In the meantime, Microsoft does have some detailed workarounds for two more mouse-related issues in Windows 8.1. One of them fixes a problem if a mouse may not be able to reach all areas of the game world, while the other deals with an issue where left-clicking with an integrated pointing device right after pressing a key no longer works. Microsoft also mentions that some users have achieved some success in older games and apps by activating compatibility mode. Again, the post has the procedure for turning this mode on in Windows 8.1.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Deep Silver

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32 Comments

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Those problems can be expected when an Operating System was designed to focus on touch-centric devices to the almost total exclusion of mouse/keyboard-centric devices. When will MS get the message "Its the User Interface?" The 8.1 release was a bandage, at best; with the fundamental problems remaining untouched.

What app are you using to produce these generic comments about touch centric devices? Windows 8.1 works fine with my keyboard and mouse.

TsarNikky said,
Those problems can be expected when an Operating System was designed to focus on touch-centric devices to the almost total exclusion of mouse/keyboard-centric devices.

I am a windows power user, happen to have several devices without touch screen support. had issues with windows 8 but never had issues with 8.1. Infact, I love it more than windows 7 now just because of start screen search integration with web search. I don't believe that in desktop mode its touch optimized, desktop mode is and forever will be mouse/keyboard optimized. touch is for Modern apps which is completely fine in my opinion. many modern apps work with keyboard and support keyboard shortcuts very well which is my main interface with machine. don't use mouse as much.

TsarNikky said,
Those problems can be expected when an Operating System was designed to focus on touch-centric devices to the almost total exclusion of mouse/keyboard-centric devices. When will MS get the message "Its the User Interface?" The 8.1 release was a bandage, at best; with the fundamental problems remaining untouched.

Yeah that's just wrong. Microsoft probably rewrote the mouse stack, and didn't test against the proper games.

TsarNikky said,
Those problems can be expected when an Operating System was designed to focus on touch-centric devices to the almost total exclusion of mouse/keyboard-centric devices. When will MS get the message "Its the User Interface?" The 8.1 release was a bandage, at best; with the fundamental problems remaining untouched.

This has to do with low power states in both the devices and the over system designs. It also has to do with expecting the 'mouse' to not be lying to the OS or the driver not to be lying to the OS for how often it samples to coordinate the polling, etc.

It also has to do with 3rd party mouse input frameworks used in some games that bypass the Windows input model. These frameworks need to be fixed to work properly with Windows.

This HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH TOUCH... (take off your tinfoit hat)

TsarNikky said,
Those problems can be expected when an Operating System was designed to focus on touch-centric devices to the almost total exclusion of mouse/keyboard-centric devices. When will MS get the message "Its the User Interface?" The 8.1 release was a bandage, at best; with the fundamental problems remaining untouched.

The mouse issues are partly caused by improvements made to DPI scaling. And guess what those improvements were for... the desktop.

I love how people like you are always wrong, it's amusing.

I think there are also issues with sleep mode. I had several system crashes when the PC enters sleep mode. This wasn't the case with 8.0. I had to turn it of for now.

Gungel said,
I think there are also issues with sleep mode. I had several system crashes when the PC enters sleep mode. This wasn't the case with 8.0. I had to turn it of for now.

I am having a similar issue in my Lenovo machine. It doesn't crash but it becomes unresponsive for a couple minutes after waking up.

Gungel said,
I think there are also issues with sleep mode. I had several system crashes when the PC enters sleep mode. This wasn't the case with 8.0. I had to turn it of for now.

8.1 uses lower power modes across the board, including sleep states.

However this can cause a problem if the computer says it supports all the features of the lower polling sleep modes yet they are not fully implemented in the EFI/Bios/chipset.

You can manually tell Windows to use alternative Sleep modes to counteract this; however it is best if you are participating in the customer experience program so that Microsoft is notified that these systems are not handling the new low power states problem and can work around them.

I just can't get my mouse to work at all in Windows 8. It's detected and the driver installs, but I can't actually do anything with it. Moving the mouse doesn't move the cursor.

If I plug that same mouse into my Mac, it works straight away. And it's not my USB ports either, as an Xbox 360 controller works fine in all of them. Weird.

jamesyfx said,
I just can't get my mouse to work at all in Windows 8. It's detected and the driver installs, but I can't actually do anything with it. Moving the mouse doesn't move the cursor.

If I plug that same mouse into my Mac, it works straight away. And it's not my USB ports either, as an Xbox 360 controller works fine in all of them. Weird.

Try another USB port, also only use the mouse driver supplied by Microsoft, not a 3rd party driver.

Done all that. Doesn't fix the problem. It's not a massive issue, I just wanted it for some games that don't support the Xbox 360 controller.. which there aren't many these days.

I've even gone and deleted entries in device manager (inc. hidden devices) to try and get it to completely re-detect it, doesn't fix the issue. I guess it's not worth fixing, I know the mouse works fine and the USB ports work fine, it should sort itself out eventually.

Okay... problems exist and they will be solved in time. If you don't upgrade right now , people call you a caveman and tell you to stay with XP.

Raa said,
Every version of Windows it's the same old story.

Yeah, in a way... Microsoft depends on hardware to perform as it tells the OS it is capable, and then we find the hardware/drivers were lying.

So when Microsoft counts on this for things like battery saving features, it makes Windows look bad, instead of the truth that the hardware was misleading users and the OS.

This was true of Vista and ACPI BIOS features that the mainboards reported and didn't provide and on and on.

Supporting millions of devices is hard enough, but when the devices have been building in cheats or cheaper features and tell the users and the OS they are doing more than what they actually are, it creates problems.

So yes, it is the same thing, except the blame isn't solely Microsoft's.

A majority of fixes in Vista SP1 were compatibility fixes for things like hardware and BIOSes that were not fully ACPI compliant, etc.

EvilAstroboy said,
I cant see the mouser cursor in STARCRAFT-2

Did you set it to ignore dpi in compatibility settings?