Microsoft to address Windows Phone App Hub issues

In March, Microsoft admitted that the process for app creators to submit their software to Windows Phone Marketplace was now taking about seven days to complete. Today, the Windows Phone blog has posted up an update on the progress of making the Windows Phone App Hub faster to respond and certify Windows Phone apps.

Microsoft's Tom Brix admits that the rapid growth of apps submitted to Windows Phone Marketplace is the main reason for the slowdown. He states:

So what are we doing about it? There is a long-term and a short-term plan. We’re already in the process of developing a more robust and scalable Marketplace service that will address current problems and pave the way for the even more rapid growth we’re expecting in the years ahead. But engineering work this significant doesn’t happen overnight. Our plan is to have it complete by late summer.

In the meantime, Microsoft is adding more servers as well as streamlining the process to get Windows Phone apps examined, certified and published. In addition, Microsoft has put in some bug fixes. While Brix says there won't be a massive change until later this summer, he does add, " ... the average app certification wait has now fallen to 2.6 business days, or about a half-day improvement over the last 10 days."

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7 Comments

OFF TOPIC: One thing that bugs me about MS and its struggle with apps for windows phone 7 is why can't they setup a department to develop apps for them and just forget about this third party app developers, they are after-all a software company. They understand metro better than anyone. They'll make more money that way. Develop games for their browsers and Facebook for exposure and then take it from there. Why beg somebody else to develop for you when you are in a better position to do it yourself

mr lefleur said,
OFF TOPIC: One thing that bugs me about MS and its struggle with apps for windows phone 7 is why can't they setup a department to develop apps for them and just forget about this third party app developers, they are after-all a software company. They understand metro better than anyone. They'll make more money that way. Develop games for their browsers and Facebook for exposure and then take it from there. Why beg somebody else to develop for you when you are in a better position to do it yourself

It won't work that way and well.. They'd be crusified tying to monopolize their ecosystem.

mr lefleur said,
OFF TOPIC: One thing that bugs me about MS and its struggle with apps for windows phone 7 is why can't they setup a department to develop apps for them and just forget about this third party app developers, they are after-all a software company. They understand metro better than anyone. They'll make more money that way. Develop games for their browsers and Facebook for exposure and then take it from there. Why beg somebody else to develop for you when you are in a better position to do it yourself

Well it is simply a business strategy. Yes, you can develop your own but you are alone and cannot make a world. To make the platform popular, third party developers are needed and extremely important. For example: everyone uses whatsapp for iSMS, Microsoft cannot make the same app with whatsapp name and use whatsapp infrastructure. They need whatsapp to make it for their WP7 platform.

mr lefleur said,
OFF TOPIC: One thing that bugs me about MS and its struggle with apps for windows phone 7 is why can't they setup a department to develop apps for them and just forget about this third party app developers, they are after-all a software company. They understand metro better than anyone. They'll make more money that way. Develop games for their browsers and Facebook for exposure and then take it from there. Why beg somebody else to develop for you when you are in a better position to do it yourself

It doesn't work that way. People want choice and having third parties "gives" the customer "more choice" and to properly support third parties you need an efficient and stable framework and ecosystem. By providing such tools to third parties, MS can focus its efforts on the platform.

mr lefleur said,
OFF TOPIC: One thing that bugs me about MS and its struggle with apps for windows phone 7 is why can't they setup a department to develop apps for them and just forget about this third party app developers, they are after-all a software company. They understand metro better than anyone. They'll make more money that way. Develop games for their browsers and Facebook for exposure and then take it from there. Why beg somebody else to develop for you when you are in a better position to do it yourself

That *was* roughly Apple's strategy in the past - with most Mac users using a few apps from Apple like iWorks, iLife, Aperture, Final Cut Pro, as well as the usual Adobe stuff. Then on iOS, they released the App Store - and the rest is history.

Microsoft strategy has always been to create tools for 3rd-party devs to grow the ecosystem. This has been the case since the early days of Windows - and it's likely Microsoft won't change that strategy especially in this day and age where iOS and Android have shown that you need (at least people think they need) the wide range of apps that Apple, Google or Microsoft as a single company will never be able to reach. Remember: "Developers! Developers! Developers!" ;-)

If you ask me, it would be good if Microsoft builds a compatibility mode for Android apps like the Blackberry Playbook. Just to grow the popularity of the platform at the initial stage. DOS 1.0 could run CP/M programs (CP/M was the dominant OS at that time), and MS Excel used to be able to read and save Lotus 1-2-3 files (Lotus 1-2-3 was the dominant spreadsheet program at that time). Allowing easy porting of Android apps (but keep the Marketplace rules to prevent some of the crappy stuff on Google Play) would let the Marketplace grow significantly and encourage more users to move to WP7. Then, when WP7 finally reaches the "tipping point" with a high-enough market share, devs will start developing natively for WP7. And then the whole thing would grow from there... (I would suggest compatibility with iOS apps, but there are no instances of successfully running iOS apps on another platform). A (somewhat related) read: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000054.html

Edited by Kai Y, Apr 13 2012, 3:09pm :

mr lefleur said,
OFF TOPIC: One thing that bugs me about MS and its struggle with apps for windows phone 7 is why can't they setup a department to develop apps for them and just forget about this third party app developers, they are after-all a software company. They understand metro better than anyone. They'll make more money that way. Develop games for their browsers and Facebook for exposure and then take it from there. Why beg somebody else to develop for you when you are in a better position to do it yourself

Because they don't even follow their own guidelines all the time. http://wmpoweruser.com/microso...s-looks-like-an-iphone-app/

thanks guys. very valid points, but i mean alternatives for apps that they can't get the developers to port to wp7 cause they are waiting for the platform to grow at the same time it'll be hard for it to grow w/out those apps. Even the ones that do port it to wp7 do a lousy job cause they can't direct too much of their resources to a small platform. Catch 32 situation

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