Microsoft to let game developers access Xbox One GPU reserves in the future

Microsoft has been tweaking the hardware inside the Xbox One since it was first announced. In the past few months, the company has confirmed that it has increased the CPU clock speed from boost from 1.60GHz to 1.75GHz along with boosting the GPU speed from from 800MHz to 853Mhz. Today, the company has confirmed that game developers will be able to access even more of the Xbox One's GPU resources in the future.

Eurogamer reports that, according to Microsoft technical fellow Andrew Goossen, about 10 percent of the Xbox One's GPU resources are devoted to graphics processing related to the Kinect add-on, along with rendering of the Xbox One apps in features like snap mode. However, Goossen said:

The current reservation provides strong isolation between the title and the system and simplifies game development - strong isolation means that the system workloads, which are variable, won't perturb the performance of the game rendering. In the future, we plan to open up more options to developers to access this GPU reservation time while maintaining full system functionality.

The prospect of giving game developers even more access to the Xbox One's GPU speed could allow for a signification boost in graphics for games between the console's launch titles and games that come out three or four years in the future, much like how some recent games for the Xbox 360 look much better than games when the console first came out in 2005.

Source: Eurogamer

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft adapts Windows 95 game 'Hover' for web browsers

Next Story

Dell announces upcoming Windows 8.1 notebooks and tablets but no new Windows RT products

12 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

AWilliams87 said,
I'm buying the Xbox One mainly for the apps and TV stuff, so i'd rather have faster multitasking and smoother snapping.

Agreed. I don't like the sound of this at all. I don't want some games to keep me from being able to use the system as I want to. This sounds awful. And it will gain them no advantages because Sony will just do the same.

When you're done playing said game, hopefully, the rest of the system can reclaim that 10%. I would guess it was reserved more for multitasking all the non-gaming apps.

MorganX said,
When you're done playing said game, hopefully, the rest of the system can reclaim that 10%. I would guess it was reserved more for multitasking all the non-gaming apps.

I wouldn't be content with that. Being able to multitask at any point opens up new possibilities.

Interesting. So we will undoubtedly see improvements in games even towards the end of the Xbox One's lifetime. I feel like this is a strategic move on their part, now they can just unlock it whenever they want; perhaps when\if the console does poorly and they can say 'developers have more access\resources\etc then ever before!'

You get those improvements in latter games anyway as developers learn the tricks of getting the most power from the hardware...

Regardless, it's nice to see Microsoft continuing to look at improvements to the console.

Quore - "much like how some recent games for the Xbox 36 look much better than games when the console first came out in 2005."

Wasn't that more developers having the skills to squeeze more out of the system (better game engines, more experience working with the hardware) vs a resource increase on later models?

Jason Stillion said,
Quore - "much like how some recent games for the Xbox 36 look much better than games when the console first came out in 2005."

Wasn't that more developers having the skills to squeeze more out of the system (better game engines, more experience working with the hardware) vs a resource increase on later models?

It does help that MS improves it's side of the software with updates as well, driver/firmware improvements for performance and so on which I'm sure they did throughout the life of the 360.

GP007 said,

It does help that MS improves it's side of the software with updates as well, driver/firmware improvements for performance and so on which I'm sure they did throughout the life of the 360.

Ironically, at least in my experience, it seemed that the dashboard got slower over time... I'm hoping that isn't the case with the One...