Microsoft To Open Visual Studio Source Code To Top Partners

Microsoft kicked off a series of technical conferences this week by pledging to release Visual Studio 2008 by the end of November, making the developer IDE the first of three major Windows platform updates scheduled to ship within the next year.

Microsoft also announced two significant licensing changes around Visual Studio that will be a boon for partners. First, the company said it will soon initiate a shared-source licensing program for Visual Studio and make the IDE's source code available to ISV partners for debugging purposes. Microsoft also removed a licensing restriction that previously limited use of the Visual Studio software development kit (SDK) to development only around Microsoft's platforms: partners will now be free to create Visual Studio-based applications and extensions on Linux and other non-Windows platforms.

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you will have to pay, but they also have Express editions which are free.
i hope that the shared-source approach can lead to integrate and optimize all the .net framework runtime libraries so apps can get a lift in performace and system footprint.

This will be a great step toward true open architecture in the .Net world. Must give props to MS for this one.

The only source code I care for that they'll also open up in VS2008 is the source code for the .NET Framework. Yay for the debugging possibilities!

Jugalator said,
The only source code I care for that they'll also open up in VS2008 is the source code for the .NET Framework. Yay for the debugging possibilities! :)

Agreed. There have been so many instances in the last 15+ years (VB) where I would have loved to see what the libraries are ACTUALLY doing. More often than not the problem was with me or a member of my team. But it would have helped to see the code process all the way though.

The release, or option to view and step through the .Net Frameworks may be the single reason we move to VS.2008

jameswjrose said,

Agreed. There have been so many instances in the last 15+ years (VB) where I would have loved to see what the libraries are ACTUALLY doing. More often than not the problem was with me or a member of my team. But it would have helped to see the code process all the way though.

The release, or option to view and step through the .Net Frameworks may be the single reason we move to VS.2008

And why didn't you use Reflector??

And, most likely Microsoft will continue to make the Express Editions of the Visual Studio products free for enthusiasts. That's a really great thing, since they include the SQL Server Express Edition as well as the MSDN Library.