Microsoft to support IMAP for using Gmail via Windows Phone

In December, Google confirmed that after January 30th, it would no longer support adding new devices for the Exchange Active Sync protocol for accessing Gmail, Calendar and Contacts. That means users of Windows Phone smartphones and Windows 8 PCs may not be able to access Gmail with new devices. A few days later, Microsoft said they were"very surprised" at Google's decision.

Now The Verge reports that, according to a statement from Microsoft, Windows Phone owners will still be able to sync up to their Gmail account via the IMAP protocol, which was one of the three that Google said it would support in place of EAS. The statement added:

Like many, we are surprised and disappointed that Google wants to make it more difficult for customers to connect their accounts to their devices. If you want better email, especially for your phone or tablet, now is a perfect time to join the millions who have already made the choice to upgrade to Outlook.com.

There's still no word on if Google's other two supported protocols, CalDAV and CardDAV, will also be supported by Microsoft. The clock is currently ticking for EAS support in Gmail to end so we would suggest if you use Gmail with your Windows Phone or Windows 8 product you go ahead and get those devices set up right now before the deadline is reached.

Source: The Verge | Image via Google

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I have given up on Google completely.

It's slowly taking over all nooks and crannies of the web, riddling it with advertising and Android.
Betting on one horse is never a good thing, so I cut the cord and started looking around for something else. So far I don't miss the Google services at all.

I for one have given up on Gmail, especially now that they peak inside my zip files, since Outlook.com isn't half bad

I've never had a problem with GMAIL on any of my devices. I have one email account, on Gmail. I access it using IMAP on my desktop and laptop computers (using Thunderbird w/Lightning for Google Calender sync), my Android phone, and my Android tablet. All emails/folders/labels are sync'ed instantly, contacts sync'ed instantly, calendar sync'ed instantly, task list sync'ed instantly. Have never used EAS and never had a need for it.

It's not about Google having to pay MS of EAS, it's Google who is knowingly shutting out a complete mobile OS and their customers for using a better method of using mail, contacts and calenders than IMAP and DAV.

Yes, the IMAP and DAV's may be open source, but multiple sources already confirmed Google made it into their own closed system. That is as proprietary as Exchange.

Wait until Google shuts down the Apple Gmail apps. Will it be less 'evil' than, or will you still shrug your shoulders and say 'when you play with fire...'

jeez....

The_Decryptor said,
IMAP is not proprietary, anybody can implement an IMAP client and have it work with the Gmail server without paying any fees to Google.

I don't really consider whatever IMAP does 'work'ing, but ok....

So many blind people here biased about Google stopping Active Sync support but how many know that Google had to pay license fees for that?
There's free alternative and MS should be using it but they are trying to force ActiveSync to collect their toll, so Google is now trying to force the opposite, and it looks like a Google success.

It's not about IMAP support you should be worried or be happy in Windows Phones but DAV support.

There's actually another good article, other than the one linked here, on the Verge: http://www.theverge.com/2013/1...exchange-activesync-debacle


Microsoft was recently attacking Google and now they're crying? Please, when you play with fire - you can burn.

Google is still paying for EAS license and it's not per user but a flat fee. So yeah, it's not saving any money for Google but just unnecessary hassle for Gmail users.

I don't see how Microsoft adding IMAP support is bad? if anything Google forced them to do something i've wanted for ages. That would mean i can set my Outlook account up on my Macbook Air's default Mail app instead of having to use some software that emulates an IMAP server and talks to Hotmail.

The Hotmail / Outlook connector for Outlook 2010 is not that great either, yes it works, however doesn't sync changes instantly like IMAP would... i would sooner use IMAP on a desktop pc to be honest.

Of course its not the most ideal solution for mobile devices.

I love using EAS across all my devices. I currently use 1 gmail account to sync my primary contacts and calender across all my mobile devices using EAS. I leverage both Mac and Windows machines and this is why I loved google; I could use EAS AND IMAP where I needed it. The nanosecond Microsoft adds IMAP support I will be ditching google.

I wish that they had just limited the support to new Gmail accounts instead of new devices. This means that when I upgrade my phone or get a new tablet I'll have to use IMAP. Crap. I've been so committed to my Gmail email address but I may someday switch over this.

I hope that something better than IMAP comes along that everyone will support.

well i don't use gmail so Fk google windows users made them popular and windows users should destroy their popularity

any day Mr.Ican'tLiveWithoutMySpyoogle
you can't take actions because you are too scroogle fanatic to relies without windows google wouldn't be google

subcld said,
\Mr.Ican'tLiveWithoutMySpyoogle\

I hope you realize that Microsoft is in the Ad business as well. If you're concerned about being spied on I wouldn't use Microsoft's online services either.

subcld said,
any day Mr.Ican'tLiveWithoutMySpyoogle
you can't take actions because you are too scroogle fanatic to relies without windows google wouldn't be google

Please explain how Windows made Google popular. Google would of done great without Windows and doesnt need Windows to function. You are obviously VERY biased by your comments.

And it is cute you are using the scroogle phrase. Trying to sound cool for MS? Oh, and XMAS is over so thankfully this scroogle crap will stop. Just more trash talk campaigning instead of telling us more about the product and what it can do.

contriver87 said,

I hope you realize that Microsoft is in the Ad business as well. If you're concerned about being spied on I wouldn't use Microsoft's online services either.

Yup, and anyone thinking that a company cannot and will not look at your data at some time, is delusional. Google is being called out lately on the SAME crap every other big company has.

subcld said,
any day Mr.Ican'tLiveWithoutMySpyoogle
you can't take actions because you are too scroogle fanatic to relies without windows google wouldn't be google

Thanks for proving who the real fanatic is here. You have no idea what you are talking about. Windows users had nothing to do with it. It just so happens the Windows OS is popular. Why didn't Windows users "make" MSN Search Popular? How about Live Search? How about Bing? Last I checked Google is very popular. Take your head out of your dark place and quit being delusional.

And like others have said, Microsoft is in the Ad business as well. You need to realize that all companies do what's best for them. They can care less about cheerleaders like yourself because, like you have proven, they can do no wrong in your tiny little bubble world. They can bring out garbage and you will like it. Don't fight for one company. They should be fighting over you.

I'm glad I can enjoy my iPad, my Xbox, my Windows 7 Desktop OS, and my Nexus phone. I have no devotion to any company.

I don't find the problem, Google simply said "i won't support a proprietary software that only runs in a proprietary software." However Gmail still support webmail, imap and pop3.

Brony said,
I don't find the problem, Google simply said "i won't support a proprietary software that only runs in a proprietary software." However Gmail still support webmail, imap and pop3.
Its not like they really pay for it, its actually quite cheap for the service it offers. Especially since all research and development is done by MS, no requirements from you or others.
Its just the best mail solution there is. And the licensing isn't going to be less for Google when they stop supporting it for new users.

Brony said,
I don't find the problem, Google simply said "i won't support a proprietary software that only runs in a proprietary software." However Gmail still support webmail, imap and pop3.

They are keeping it around for the business accounts so they can continue to use it. Mostly because many businesses used EAS for their email so it is attractive for them.

Shadowzz said,
Its not like they really pay for it, its actually quite cheap for the service it offers. Especially since all research and development is done by MS, no requirements from you or others.
Its just the best mail solution there is. And the licensing isn't going to be less for Google when they stop supporting it for new users.

Not exactly. When a company licenses EAS they license the protocol and its "signature" (meaning how things should talk to each other, the specification is probably the best analogous word).

All of the code to make the Exchange ActiveSync service work has to be written and maintained by the licensee. So Google has written all of the code for GMail EAS and they maintain it. So, all of the R&D and etc aren't done by MS.

We don't know all of the details really so we can't say who is in the wrong here. MS could be forcing Google to do this to bulk up Outlook.com as a competitor. We have no idea what the licensee fee MS charges Google for using EAS in Gmail. It is possible MS raised those rates and pressured Google into dropping the support.

Either way, there is a lot of work not done by MS when EAS is licensed.

Source: http://www.microsoft.com/about...angeactivesyncprotocol.aspx

psreloaded said,
Microsoft forcing Google... o.O I would think that Google would have stated that in public if it was the case... lol

That was pure speculation. I'm not saying definitely who is doing what here as I'm not privy to the backdoor discussions. My overall point to make was simply that MS didn't write and doesn't maintain the code for Google's EAS GMail service.

Yeah I do not get the crap ether. IMAP is open. Just use that.

Microsoft is the dumbass for taking open standards out of their software not Google.

Brony said,
I don't find the problem, Google simply said "i won't support a proprietary software that only runs in a proprietary software." However Gmail still support webmail, imap and pop3.

The gmail app uses a closed proprietary protocol.

IMAP is open. Just use that.

Except that IMAP sucks, hard.

Windows Phone has always supported IMAP, so Microsoft is doing nothing in response to this, merely clarifying its position.

In the immediate future, users will probably have to manually add their Gmail accounts as IMAP accounts, rather than using the built-in wizard which sets Gmail up using EAS. I don't see how Microsoft will be able to roll out any sort of OS update on short notice, given the usual carrier recalcitrance. Windows Phone 7 will probably never get an update.

How fun, IMAP is so robust and reliable. LOL

Header Syncing problems requiring a complete re-download of all content, and issues with large numbers of emails in a folder are just a couple of fun IMAP features.

This should get people to forward to Gmail to their Microsoft Account and Outlook/Hotmail. Because with EAS, they can literally have unlimited amounts of email on their phone, instantly in sync.

The data consumption difference between IMAP and EAS alone should be enough that users on all platforms will eventually be a cause of concern.

Just one redownload of 10,000 email headers, which is common in syncing issues with IMAP, would be enough of a data drain to make GMail painful for people on limited data plans.

Thank you Google for shoving people away from your invasive crappy service with an antiquated protocol.

thenetavenger said,
How fun, IMAP is so robust and reliable. LOL

Header Syncing problems requiring a complete re-download of all content, and issues with large numbers of emails in a folder are just a couple of fun IMAP features.

This should get people to forward to Gmail to their Microsoft Account and Outlook/Hotmail. Because with EAS, they can literally have unlimited amounts of email on their phone, instantly in sync.

The data consumption difference between IMAP and EAS alone should be enough that users on all platforms will eventually be a cause of concern.

Just one redownload of 10,000 email headers, which is common in syncing issues with IMAP, would be enough of a data drain to make GMail painful for people on limited data plans.

Thank you Google for shoving people away from your invasive crappy service with an antiquated protocol.

The last time I tried EAS with Outlook.com it took forever for a message to sync up. With gmail it is instant. If I do a test message it shows up on my phone immediately. If I do it with EAS on Outlook.com it can take up to 30 minutes or longer for it to appear and that's assuming it does at all.

shinji257 said,

The last time I tried EAS with Outlook.com it took forever for a message to sync up. With gmail it is instant. If I do a test message it shows up on my phone immediately. If I do it with EAS on Outlook.com it can take up to 30 minutes or longer for it to appear and that's assuming it does at all.


What? Mine syncs instantly and always has, even with the old live mail. Are you sure you have the "as messages arrive" option selected?

shinji257 said,

The last time I tried EAS with Outlook.com it took forever for a message to sync up. With gmail it is instant. If I do a test message it shows up on my phone immediately. If I do it with EAS on Outlook.com it can take up to 30 minutes or longer for it to appear and that's assuming it does at all.

The gmail app does not use IMAP. It uses a closed internal system. EAS is more open than whatever Google uses.

Not the first time, I'm afraid. Like all former Google users here in China we saw first hand exactly how customer-friendly Google is. This move smells of panic as many of the Asian handset manufacturers are now openly discussing issues with Google/Motorola and many are quietly moving over to WP8 (e.g. Huawei) and consumers are discovering the increased stability, performance and SECURITY of WP8 of Android.

Now if we could only have Xbox Live in China....

Major Plonquer said,
Not the first time, I'm afraid. Like all former Google users here in China we saw first hand exactly how customer-friendly Google is. This move smells of panic as many of the Asian handset manufacturers are now openly discussing issues with Google/Motorola and many are quietly moving over to WP8 (e.g. Huawei) and consumers are discovering the increased stability, performance and SECURITY of WP8 of Android.

Now if we could only have Xbox Live in China....

EAS was really only meant as a band-aid for Calendar and Contact sync anyways. I don't think it was meant as a permanent bit in any market although apparently they are keeping it around for the business/paying customers. CalDAV and CardDAV are open protocols that can accomplish the same thing so they are dropping support on free accounts to save resources and encourage the use of existing open protocols.

oh let me guess, you are high on google! If Active Sync is just a Band-Aid then I can't imagine what CalDav/CardDav are... we'll consider it a dirty napkin over your scar to heal it.

nickcruz said,
oh let me guess, you are high on google! If Active Sync is just a Band-Aid then I can't imagine what CalDav/CardDav are... we'll consider it a dirty napkin over your scar to heal it.
Exactly what I was thinking.

shinji257 said,

EAS was really only meant as a band-aid for Calendar and Contact sync anyways. I don't think it was meant as a permanent bit in any market although apparently they are keeping it around for the business/paying customers. CalDAV and CardDAV are open protocols that can accomplish the same thing so they are dropping support on free accounts to save resources and encourage the use of existing open protocols.


EAS was Microsoft's answer to Blackberry and the key feature was its push technology (something that Gmail doesn't support without EAS). It wasn't a bandaid.