Microsoft updates Xbox privacy policies ahead of Xbox One launch

As Microsoft moves ahead with the launch of the Xbox One on Nov. 22, the company is preparing the folks who buy its next-generation console with some changes and additions to their privacy rules concerning Xbox hardware and software.

In a newly updated webpage, Microsoft goes over the specifics on its data collection policies on Xbox consoles. One section concerns the Kinect sensor, which has been the subject of a ton of Internet message board posts in the past few months, with many people believing Microsoft will put an "eye" in their living room if they buy the Xbox One. Microsoft executives have tried to calm those concerns, and today's updated privacy policy is a continuation of that message.

While the Kinect device can be used by an Xbox One owner to sign onto the console, the privacy policy states, "This authentication information stays on the console and is not shared with anyone." It adds that owners also have control over whether or not voice commands are "captured for analysis." The Kinect sensor can be turned off at any time and users have control when photographs are taken with the Kinect camera during gameplay.

Any skeletal movements that are detected by the Kinect sensor for games and apps can also be controlled by the user in terms of how the movement stats are managed and whether or not they are shared. The sensor can also detect and measure facial expressions for use in a game but Microsoft's policy states, "This data does not identify you, stays on the console and is destroyed once your session ends."

The new Xbox privacy polices also goes over how data is collected from services such as Xbox Music, the Xbox SmartGlass applications and more. It also talks about how ads are shown on the Xbox One's dashboard, stating that users can opt out of viewing any personalized and targeted ads.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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5 Comments

Microsoft doesn't take good notes it would appear. With Windows Phone flailing like a fish out of water, shouldn't they be looking at the most tempting "pros" of the competition instead of going off and displaying foolish examples such as "smoked by Windows phone"? What a train wreck that was. They need to offer everything the competition does, and "one up" them in order to gain any ground!

Cantelumber said,
Microsoft doesn't take good notes it would appear. With Windows Phone flailing like a fish out of water, shouldn't they be looking at the most tempting "pros" of the competition instead of going off and displaying foolish examples such as "smoked by Windows phone"? What a train wreck that was. They need to offer everything the competition does, and "one up" them in order to gain any ground!
What?

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