Microsoft urges companies (again) to dump Windows XP

Microsoft has been trying to get large businesses to upgrade their PCs from Windows XP to Windows 7 for the past few months. The company made a plea back in July on its official Windows blog and did so again in September. Now a new post on the official Windows blog takes the time both celebrate Windows XP on the eve of its 10th anniversary while at the same time asking businesses once again to strongly consider updating to the Windows 7 operating system.

The post, written by Microsoft's Rich Reynolds, praises Windows XP for its many features that are now standard for anyone who wants to get work done on a PC. He states, "Windows XP offered a new user interface that helped people more easily find what they needed. One of the most notable advances was it democratized digital photography. Windows XP made it easy to get images from digital cameras, manage and print pictures from your PC, with broad support for a range of cameras and photo printers. Wireless also became the given with built-in support; plug and play became the standard. It was a great OS for its time."

But there are also things that Windows XP can't do but that Windows 7 can. Reynolds says, "I recently experienced this on a trip back from Dallas to Seattle. I had an urgent project I needed to work on and by using the in-flight WIFI, I was able to securely access a folder on my corporate network, work on my presentation, and collaborate with a colleague of mine who happened to be traveling in India at the time – all from 30,000 feet thanks to DirectAccess in Windows 7 Enterprise, and Lync. There’s no way I could have done this 10 years ago."

Reynolds repeats what Microsoft has said before that official support for Windows XP is scheduled to end on April 2014. But what if businesses want to just wait until Microsoft releases the upcoming Windows 8 OS? Reynolds takes a quote from the Gartner research group who said in a recent report, "With support for Windows XP ending in April 2014, we believe it would be dangerous for organizations now running XP to attempt to skip Windows 7 and move directly to Windows 8. Organizations running Windows XP and working on Windows 7 migrations: Continue as planned; do not switch to Windows 8."

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XP is a dinosaur in computer terms. We can't wait to upgrade to Windows 7. I already have many users on it, but we use NAV 4.0 SP3 which won't work on 7. We plan to upgrade to NAV 2009 R2 in the next 3 months (been planning on this for 4 months now). Then we'll get everyone on 7. Until then Windows 7 users are on the terminal server to use that.

There is a saying "dont fix whats not broke" while MS want companies to keep forking out on updates they are totally entitled to say "no, were quite happy saving our money" sure xp is out of date now compared to Windows 7 but it was a good OS imo well if you compare it to Vista anyhow lol. I can understand they are frustrated and have to keep doing patches because companies wount move on, but if they can save money and get the MS packages cheaper at a later date then why not? Makes total sense to me, if it works there is no need to replace it unless its seriously going to improve productivity/efficiency.

/loves googles spell check

Xoligy said,
There is a saying "dont fix whats not broke" while MS want companies to keep forking out on updates they are totally entitled to say "no, were quite happy saving our money" sure xp is out of date now compared to Windows 7 but it was a good OS imo well if you compare it to Vista anyhow lol. I can understand they are frustrated and have to keep doing patches because companies wount move on, but if they can save money and get the MS packages cheaper at a later date then why not? Makes total sense to me, if it works there is no need to replace it unless its seriously going to improve productivity/efficiency.

/loves googles spell check

Actually the saying is "If it's not broke, don't fix it!"

Xoligy said,
There is a saying "dont fix whats not broke" while MS want companies to keep forking out on updates they are totally entitled to say "no, were quite happy saving our money" sure xp is out of date now compared to Windows 7 but it was a good OS imo well if you compare it to Vista anyhow lol. I can understand they are frustrated and have to keep doing patches because companies wount move on, but if they can save money and get the MS packages cheaper at a later date then why not? Makes total sense to me, if it works there is no need to replace it unless its seriously going to improve productivity/efficiency.

/loves googles spell check

it is obsolete not outdated

there is a differences

Ci7 said,

it is obsolete not outdated

there is a differences


Most of the machinery used in factories is outdated within a few years but they keep it because its too expensive to keep upgrading every x years. If you watch shows like American Loggers they have machinery thats 20years old it works so there is no need to update!

My company is over 40,000 world wide, over 10 different brands, with multiple different AD and Novel domains. We started migrating to Win 7 late 2010, we are on track to be fully on Windows 7 by end of 2011.

Epic0range said,
My company is over 40,000 world wide, over 10 different brands, with multiple different AD and Novel domains. We started migrating to Win 7 late 2010, we are on track to be fully on Windows 7 by end of 2011.

Good. The sooner it dies the better.

Give it up MS.

Businesses aren't going to budge if they don't have to. Even they are hurting from the economy!!

Not their fault MS decided to support it until 2014!!

The sooner XP dies. The faster us developers won't have to be held back by the crappy ancient OS. Sure, XP was great when it first came out, but nowadays it's garbage. No DirectX 10/11; new hardware don't support XP; 2TB+ HDD in XP == fail, can't use more than 3GB in XP. XP's 64bit sucks arse.

I'm sorry, but many people complain, that they are broke, apps don't work, or anything else. Why couldn't you have saved money for the OS, since Vista was announced? Have you bothered one bit to actually try to find a deal on the net, or other means? What app, that is left, that still doesn't support Vista/7? Good luck gamers, that still run XP. You miss out of Battlefield 3 for example, which doesn't support XP at all. What you going to do, when other games, that you want doesn't support XP?

We developers and other consumers are screwed over, because we have to wait for you, to wake up, and move on to a recent OS. We can't get 64bit applications like MSN, Browsers, etc, because you hold us back.

While, I do understand, that in a business setting, it will take time to upgrade to a new version. But, what are you going to do? Wait until Windows 49 to finally upgrade? Most of you will say, that you can't upgrade, because of your apps? Well, blame your developers for making OS dependent source code, ahnd not designing it better for future needs/upgrades.

dodgetigger said,
I don't think those companies care about DirectX 10/11.

You're obviously not aware of DirectCompute in DX11.
MANY companies care about DirectX 11, or they should.

Great for gpGPU solutions.

Glassed Silver said,

Wow, modern!
I know places that run 3.x

GS:mac


In in the Royal Air Force, and most of our radars run on Windows NT 4, except for a few nav aids that run on Linux, even the Eurofighters run on NT 4. Good news though, next year we're upgrading the radar feeds to Windows XP!

I already have migrated partially. I will completely when they allow disabling auto sort and auto arrange in the newer post Vista OSes (and some fix broken features).

if windows 7 and windows 8 works great with pc, netbook or anything with less than 1gb of ram it would be great but it wont happen...

So XP its the only choice, start releasing a SP4

1: Make it cheap to upgrade / free for 7 days (Windows 7, 7 days free to upgrade).
2: Stop supporting XP.
3: Work with the likes of HP and Dell to produce the "business" PC's with Windows 7 installed.

Businesses will soon upgrade.

Mr Spoon said,
1: Make it cheap to upgrade / free for 7 days (Windows 7, 7 days free to upgrade).
2: Stop supporting XP.
3: Work with the likes of HP and Dell to produce the "business" PC's with Windows 7 installed.

Businesses will soon upgrade.


The part of the world I live in, these companies have already been selling business PC's with Windows 7 for a very long time. We are actually paying for downgrade licences now instead

That's nice, Microsoft. Tell that to the companies who treat IT as an expense that has to be minimized with the attitude that, "If it works, why change?" Note the key word of "It works" and the missing word "well". Many times, the final IT decision isn't made by the IT department, but the accounting department, who looks at the costs of the upgrade including training. Then, there are those who resist the upgrades, stating quite firmly that they make money by selling stuff, not by parking their ass in a training course the whole day.

This is business reality.

I know a company that is still running Windows 2000 Professional as their computers OS, since the owner is a friend, I asked him about it, and it's all about cost, legacy software, and training, money he simply doesn't have in a tight economy. It's easy for MS to urge companies to upgrade, but their OS's are just too expensive for a small company to warrant the upgrade.

Azies said,
I know a company that is still running Windows 2000 Professional as their computers OS, since the owner is a friend, I asked him about it, and it's all about cost, legacy software, and training, money he simply doesn't have in a tight economy. It's easy for MS to urge companies to upgrade, but their OS's are just too expensive for a small company to warrant the upgrade.

W2k o.0

it is no longer supported

Of course they shouldn't wait for Windows 8. Because it sucks, and its interface is utterly non-conducive for the corporate work space.

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