Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Release Candidate launched

Alongside the launch of the Windows 8 Release Preview, Microsoft has also launched the release candidate build of Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Professional. This is now the official name for the product that was previously known as Microsoft Visual Studio 11.

Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Release Candidate: Download here

This new version of Microsoft's software development tool has a lot of changes compared to the beta version that was first released in late February. One of the most requested changes was to add more color to the rather drab look of the software's UI. Microsoft has made things more colorful for the Release Candidate version by colorizing the tool's Status bar, lightening the grays in the light theme and window chrome, and by putting in broader and bolder use of accent colors in tool window headers and tab treatments.

Microsoft recently announced that it will also offer free versions of Visual Studio 2012 under the Express branding. However, the company's decision to not make an Express version of Visual Studio 2012 specifically for developers of desktop apps for Windows 8 has upset many of those same developers, who feel that they should have the same free version of the software as Windows 8 Metro developers will have.

Image via Microsoft

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20 Comments

I'm excited to update! I sure miss all the extensions I have in 2010. I hope that with this new release, more of the developers of the extensions will publish them for 2012.

I'm glad they changed it. Visual Studio 2010, and to some extent the VS2012 beta looks so dreary that I felt sad looking at it. More color is always good!

Applications compiled with this won't even run on Windows XP SP3.

Just something to keep in mind for especially the corporate world.

And yes, this is intentional.

Northgrove said,
Applications compiled with this won't even run on Windows XP SP3.

Yes, it will, both managed or native. If you're going managed, you'll obviously need to target 4.0 of the platform via multi-targeting as that's the last one supported under a legacy OS. For non-managed, the RC build currently requires a side-by-side install of 2010 so 2012 can use the depreciated compilers and runtimes but they say they're working on having it all integrated as a post RTM update. It's all explained on the Visual Studio Blog.

Not sure where you're getting "this is intentional" from.

Max Norris said,

Yes, it will, both managed or native. If you're going managed, you'll obviously need to target 4.0 of the platform via multi-targeting as that's the last one supported under a legacy OS. For non-managed, the RC build currently requires a side-by-side install of 2010 so 2012 can use the depreciated compilers and runtimes but they say they're working on having it all integrated as a post RTM update. It's all explained on the Visual Studio Blog.

Not sure where you're getting "this is intentional" from.

Misinformed people love to spread their misinformation

Northgrove said,
Applications compiled with this won't even run on Windows XP SP3.

Just something to keep in mind for especially the corporate world.

And yes, this is intentional.

Besides the explanation Max Norris gave, why in the world would you think this would be true? Yes there are plenty of apps designed and compiled for Win 8 that won't run under XP but if you're targeting a specific framework and compile it for x86 then it'll run on XP.

Northgrove said,
Applications compiled with this won't even run on Windows XP SP3.

Just something to keep in mind for especially the corporate world.

And yes, this is intentional.

Compile it for .net 4 instead of .Net 4.5 and it will run on XP as well. You'll lose out on the new 4.5 features though.

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