Microsoft will offer OneDrive for Business as stand alone service starting April 1st

Microsoft officially changed the name of their enterprise-based SkyDrive Pro to OneDrive for Business a week ago and today the company confirmed that it will offer a way to access the data storage service without having to also get an Office 365 subscription.

In a post on the OneDrive blog, Microsoft said that the stand alone service will be offered starting on April 1st. It will give each employee 25GB of free cloud storage space along with the option to buy additional storage. The blog states:

With the new offering, businesses of all sizes can get started with a full-featured and intuitive file sync and share service that includes Office Online, so employees can collaborate on Office documents in real time via a browser or using their Office desktop applications.

Microsoft will offer some lower promotional pricing for OneDrive for Business from April to September. One plan will charge $2.50 a month per user for all licensing agreements and programs and the other will charge $1.50 a month per user if the company has a Office with Software Assurance or Office 365 ProPlus with Open, Enterprise Agreement, and MPSA contracts.

Microsoft has also released some new features for OneDrive for Business, including placing controls like uploading, syncing, and editing documents directly above a user's personal folder; improvements have also been made for searching inside the OneDrive files.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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11 Comments

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Though many businesses use the free OneDrive for commercial use, you're not really supposed to according to the license agreement. But technically they have no way of enforcing this. I believe there are enterprise-level features included with OneDrive for Business that regular OneDrive doesn't have.

ACTIONpack said,
Why use Business version when you can get it free with OneDrive?

There are additional enterprise features that doesn't exist in the 'single user' consumer version.

LogicalApex said,
The license agreement for the free version likely prohibits commercial use...
No point in speculating on the content of easily found and read agreements; http://windows.microsoft.com/e...icrosoft-services-agreement

Nothing in there about how you can use OneDrive commercially.

And, too, one can find out the differences with a quick search:
http://office.microsoft.com/en...A102822076.aspx#differences

Basically. OneDrive for business is powered by SharePoint (it seems). Many more collaboration features available at that point. There are also more tools to sync the data etc.

LogicalApex said,
No need for me to read the license agreement for a service I don't use and likely never will

I worded my comment clearly enough to say this is something that commonly happens, but I didn't assert it as a fact in this case.

"I don't use this. I won't ever use this. I don't care to read the license agreement. But... there's probably something in there about personal use only"

There you would have been contributing nothing to the conversation and warning other users as such.

P.S. I love the "I didn't assert it as a fact in this case." A clear case of FUD here bud

MrHumpty said,
"I don't use this. I won't ever use this. I don't care to read the license agreement. But... there's probably something in there about personal use only"

There you would have been contributing nothing to the conversation and warning other users as such.

P.S. I love the "I didn't assert it as a fact in this case." A clear case of FUD here bud

Well... The original comment in and of itself is a FUD comment. The OP could have researched the differences, read the license agreements, or done any number of things to see why Microsoft is offering this and why some businesses may choose to buy it.

It is extremely common for free apps and services to exclude commercial use, for obvious reasons, so my comment was to echo that reality while informing the reader that I could be wrong in this regard. I haven't read the agreement to verify your assertion that it isn't there because I don't see a need to do so.

its for control, it's the same reason there is a business edition of the other services such as dropbox and box.net.

IT Admins have control over the accounts and then give each employee access to the service, if the employee leaves the company the information stored is still under company control. Personal accounts make this a lot lot harder, yes they could sign up with a company email but generally management and control is a lot easier on the business systems which are designed for IT administration.