Microsoft's smartphones account for 93.7% of the Windows Phone market, needs more OEM support

We all know that Nokia's handset division, which was sold to Microsoft, accounted for a large portion of the Windows Phone pie and that trend continues for the month of May. In fact, according to Adduplex, Nokia phones gained another .2% of the pie, while not a huge increase in the overall picture, it shows that they are still growing their presence.

It was quite obvious why Microsoft had to buy Nokia's handset division as they were more in control of the destiny of Windows Phone thanks to their massive presence in this space. But for Microsoft, they need significantly more OEM support if they wish to gain more adoption in the over-all user market space as Windows Phone is still a minority player when compared to iOS and Android. 

As you can see from the data, HTC is the only OEM who even makes a small dent in Microsoft's share with Samsung, who is a power-house in the Android department, barely surpassing 1% of the user base. While the Lumia handsets are fine pieces of craftsmanship, until other OEMs take Windows Phone and start putting it on their premium hardware, the platform will always be the 'second OS' for these vendors which will continue to limit the growth potential for the platform.

For OEMs, Microsoft is making Windows Phone more attractive by making the OS free for devices under 9 inches in size. Only time will tell if this is enough of an incentive to build more devices using the OS.

With Microsoft pushing Windows 8 forward with the 8.1 update that will be arriving soon, the company is not waiting for OEMs to pick up the slack and is willing to go forward, on its own terms, and show the market that it too, can compete in the highly competitive smartphone arena with first party hardware.

Adduplex gathered the data from 4114 Windows Phone apps running AdDuplex SDK v.2.

Source: Adduplex

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

New technology will shrink laptop power bricks to a quarter of current size

Next Story

Microsoft Smartwatch: Two day battery life, works with any smartphone

19 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

How about getting the carriers a bigger incentive to push the phones? I was at Costco and wanted to look at the Lumia Icon and the guy at the kiosk (where they have all major carriers and phones represented), said, "Oh, we don't have any Windows Phones because nobody was interested in them."

Then I was on the phone with a Verizon sales rep talking about upgrading and when I asked how much was the Lumia Icon, he said, "I don't think we carry that" and proceeded to tell me how awesome the HTC M8 was. When I said, "Yeah but isn't that Android?", he paused and agreed like he was thinking, what's your point?

Sigh.

I wish MS had never named the OS, Windows Phone. Most stupid decision ever. Should have named it something catchy. And something that did not abbreviate to WP. I STILL think of Word Perfect.

There are a bunch of low cost OEM phones coming out soon. Lenovo has a 8.1 device coming. Its not wp's fault that Samsung and such just recycle android devices. None of the above share is from a Microsoft mobile device, that share is all Nokia, nothing to do with MS. Wait for the next batch of devices to actually call them MS phones.

Okay, while diversity in design and competition are important, if all the other OEMs are going to do is regurgitate their ugly, horrid excuses from Android, then, absolutely NO. Until they can design something other than trash, I'd rather enjoy the better devices and experience that Nokia brought to the table.

Seeing how Apple does not need more OEM support I'd venture to say that Microsoft would probably do better to cut OEM support altogether and start actually marketing and selling the Windows Phone Ecosystem as a viable alternative to Android, going up against iOS is really not productive nor will it yield much results in the end.

I tell you what they should do and should have done since 8.1 at least. Nokia hardware is fine. they have to fix the software. get it as close as possible to full windows. release handfull of useful apps and games just like the one for windows. and fix the app list and option menu so its not bunch of text stacked on the top of each other. make XBOX Music Free without subscription for limited tracks just like how the website and windows app work( it doesn't make sense that Windows Phone users are treated same as iOS and Android User)

Makes me wonder why other OEM's even bother with Windows Phone at all. I'm guessing it has more to do with contracts to build WP built into Android patent royalty deals with Microsoft, than actually making any money out of WP itself.

Most of those smartphones were made by Nokia so I think its a bit off to say its Microsofts own hardware. Didnt see Nokia logo go away after MS bought them...just my two cents.

Microsoft bought the only company that was successful with WP, so it's a fair statement to make. There simply isn't enough diversity in the WP range, especially not when you compare it to Android.

It's the same problem Microsoft has faced with Windows RT - OEMs just aren't interested.

They bought Nokia after Nokia had already done the devices, that doesnt automatically make those devices Microsofts. At least thats how I see it. And since Nokia still exsists its even more so.

Microsoft owns the rights to all the Nokia devices manufactured with WP, which means those devices do belong to Microsoft. At the moment Microsoft is virtually the only WP manufacturer.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
They bought Nokia after Nokia had already done the devices, that doesnt automatically make those devices Microsofts. At least thats how I see it. And since Nokia still exsists its even more so.

MS bought the Nokia handset division, so those phones are now Microsoft's and not Nokia's.

OEMs aren't going to put any real effort into Windows Phone as long as they'll be competing directly against the platform holder (Microsoft owned Nokia).
That's not to say they won't make Windows Phones, they'll throw the free OS onto compatible hardware they develop for Android and such to see how it sells but they aren't going to put a lot of effort in a market where their main competition has unfair access to the OS.

MS needs to decide if it wants to be in the hardware business (as they currently are) in which case they are going to have to use the Apple model and do it all on their own through their Nokia acquisition or they need to exit hardware and spin off Nokia (even as a wholly owned subsidiary but with NO SPECIAL ACCESS similar to what Google did with Motorola when they owned them) in which case OEMs will be more willing to compete (on a level playing field).

Unfair playing field + Low market share = minimal OEM interest.

Because Google and Motorola worked out perfectly. If anything Google is moving a bit away from its model and going towards the Microsoft route with Android Silver. I get what you're saying though I still think there's a point where Microsoft can balance its own hardware aspirations with that of its OEMs. Going all in or all out is aren't the only options. Only a sith deals in absolutes! :p

Vlad Dudau said,
Because Google and Motorola worked out perfectly. If anything Google is moving a bit away from its model and going towards the Microsoft route with Android Silver. I get what you're saying though I still think there's a point where Microsoft can balance its own hardware aspirations with that of its OEMs. Going all in or all out is aren't the only options. Only a sith deals in absolutes! :p

Google and Motorola DID work out perfectly from an OEMs perspective. Motorola got no special access to Android and was eventually sold off. Google and Android Silver aren't changing anything in that Google wants OEMs to make their hardware. MS can balance it's hardware aspirations by giving it's hardware component (Nokia) no access to the OS or anything else that it doesn't also give all other OEMs. That wasn't even the case before they bought them though, Nokia had special access beyond OEMs and so the OEMs all bailed. No company wants to compete in a market where the odds are stacked against them. Maybe if they had > 50% of the market like Android does then MS could push them but why would a company choose to compete in a rigged game for a share of a tiny fraction of the market when it can compete on even footing for the majority of the market. Again though it doesn't hurt them to throw the OS on compatible hardware they are developing anyway so you'll see more MS phones from OEMs in the future but only because MS has taken great pains to make sure the OS runs on their hardware, not the other way around. If MS wants OEMs to push the market then they need to even the playing field between them an Nokia, if they don't want to even the playing field then they can expect minimal support from OEMs and they're going to have to basically emulate Apple.

Apple iOS devices account for 100% of their market... they're doing OK.
Microsoft will end up producing some quality WindowsPhones I have zero doubt. They also have a hand full of OEM support. what more do you want them to do?

They did make WindowsPhone OS free, as well Windows 8.1 Free for specific devices. I think they are making the right moves

dingl_ said,
Apple iOS devices account for 100% of their market.

Time to start some trust busting on the Apple iOS monopoly! </s>

To be fair, the HTC 8X was a really nice phone. If it had any issues at all, it was that it didn't have various models with more storage, for example. If they came out with a very similar design, but with more storage and support for Win Phone 8.1 built in, I can't imagine it wouldn't be successful.