Microsoft's Tellme not the same as Siri, as video explains

Which is more important: getting a product out first, or taking more time but getting it done right? The answer may be best explained by a video comparison between Microsoft's Tellme and Apple's Siri, both of them being the voice-enabled Jeeves (or Jeevette?) of their respective smartphone operating systems.

Let's rewind a few days back, where in an interview with Forbes, Microsoft's Chief Research and Strategy officer Craig Mundie asserts Windows Phone 7 had voice-enabled searching before Siri hit the global spotlight:

Around that time last year, Microsoft's Kinect for the Xbox 360 launched with much fanfare in the media, arguably at a comparable level as the iPhone 4S with Siri did. While Kinect was able to connect with and engage new customers, one can't really say the same for Tellme.

Take this video from Australian blog TechAU as an example. A Samsung WP7 phone and an iPhone are placed side by side, with the same voice command read to both of them simultaneously.

 

How did each device fare? Have a look:

Original: "Create a meeting tomorrow at 10 AM."
Tellme: Searching for "creating a meeting tomorrow at teen anal"...
Siri: OK, here's your meeting. Note that you already have a meeting about TAE Course at 8:45 AM...

Original: "Send text to Simone."
Tellme: Searching for "stain detector simo"...
Siri: OK, I can send a text to Simone Arnold for you... What would you like it to say?

Original: "What time is it in Perth?"
Tellme: Searching for "what time is it impo"...
Siri: In Perth, it's 5:00 PM.

Original: "Play artist Skrillex."
Tellme: Searching for "play artist screamworks"...
Siri: Now playing Skrillex.... [music plays]

It appears that, for the moment, voice recognition for Australian English needs work on Windows Phone, and that more commands should be recognized other than quickly falling back to searching for an unrecognized phrase on the Internet. Hopefully other English accents (or other languages) fare better than this!

We should note that both Tellme and Siri are still technically in beta and that both services are bound to improve within the coming months. So for the time being, Microsoft's claim that they had voice recognition features in Windows Phone before Apple did remains true. But the two being comparable on equal grounds may be a bit of a stretch.

Thanks Tech Star for the heads up on the forums!

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More with the Microsoft-hating from Neowin. Lovely. Yes, there are a lot of things that Siri does better, and that's only by virtue of the fact that Apple saw what TellMe was doing and had the time and inclination to one-up them. I have not doubt that TellMe will advance in the next round. That's just how the game is played. However, I can PROMISE you that most people do NOT use Siri the way or to the extent that Apple would like you to think. And If I have to use so many flipping words just to get the phone to DO something, then that's just stupid. I'd rather not get into a lengthy conversation with my phone. Give me a Star Trek experience, not HAL 9000 experience. Stupid, stupid, stupid.

I haven't used Siri, but since it recognizes natural language one would guess that as long as the WP commands make sense Siri would pick them up as well. That is, it's not that you have to use different commands, just that WP only uses a subset of the possible sentences you can use with Siri to get something done.

While I understand what you are trying to say, TellMe is as useful as Siri as far as I know (I haven't tried an iPhone 4S personally). Everyday, when I leave home I put my bluetooth hands-free and walking or driving around is a breeze with all the messages (SMS, Messenger and Facebook) being read to me. I can say "call" or "reply" and dictate my message. All this wit my phone on my pocket or in my backpack.

It's arguable which one is best because they work in different ways. The same can be said for their usefulness. About the "fun" part, I don't want to play with my phone, I just want to be able to hear, dictate and make calls while I'm not in direct contact with my phone. WP does this exceptionally well.

The one thing missing right now is the ability to schedule appointments or reminders. Siri seems very good at this, as well as the other actions.

The main point for voice actions, IMHO should be to be able to control the phone without any other interaction than your voice. I find it very funny that people are talking wonders about Siri's ability to hear questions and reply with funny quotes or else. Sure it's appealing, but nowhere near an useful feature.

That video comparison is as lame as it gets because Windows Phone needs to hear CALL, TEXT, REPLY, FIND, OPEN. It can't, I repeat, It can't understand natural language to perform those actions.

Summarizing: You can't compare both services as they work differently. They both work well and are useful as they are today. Making arguments as to which one is better is so silly if you ask me.

ajua said,
That video comparison is as lame as it gets because Windows Phone needs to hear CALL, TEXT, REPLY, FIND, OPEN. It can't, I repeat, It can't understand natural language to perform those actions.

It's not lame since they are specifically proving that WP doesn't recognize natural language, and they did that in response to the first video where Craig claims that "all that functionality has been there for years".

Siri recognizes natural language while TellMe doesn't, and Siri picked up the Australian accent right while TellMe also didn't.

That doesn't mean that TellMe doesn't work, just that Siri works much better. Both have some functionalities that the other lack, but when it comes down to plain voice recognition Siri has a clear edge.

We have been able to use predefined voice commands to control computers for ages, but using perfectly natural language and getting the software to understand the context is not that usual. TellMe doesn't do that, so Craig's claim is incorrect.

I've been trying to figure out why WP7 fans have butthurt over Siri, but I can't figure it out. Siri is clearly better on a number of level. It's personified. It's funny. It's interesting. It makes voice actions fun.

Microsoft's version is exactly what every other voice service has done for years, and it really gives you no reason to actually use it.

Owen W said,
I've been trying to figure out why WP7 fans have butthurt over Siri, but I can't figure it out. Siri is clearly better on a number of level. It's personified. It's funny. It's interesting. It makes voice actions fun.

Microsoft's version is exactly what every other voice service has done for years, and it really gives you no reason to actually use it.

Yeah, I guess you're right. I am going to get an iPhone 4S just so I can ask Siri to marry me. /s

Owen W said,
I've been trying to figure out why WP7 fans have butthurt over Siri, but I can't figure it out. Siri is clearly better on a number of level. It's personified. It's funny. It's interesting. It makes voice actions fun.

Microsoft's version is exactly what every other voice service has done for years, and it really gives you no reason to actually use it.

Owen, both TellMe and Siri get the job done, doesn't matter how. Personally I couldn't care if Siri is personified, I don't want my phone to be funny and I don't want voice actions to be fun. I just want voice actions that work and TellMe works provided you use it correctly, which the idiot in the second video didn't.

neo158 said,

Owen, both TellMe and Siri get the job done, doesn't matter how. Personally I couldn't care if Siri is personified, I don't want my phone to be funny and I don't want voice actions to be fun. I just want voice actions that work and TellMe works provided you use it correctly, which the idiot in the second video didn't.

Suppose you leave out syntax differences for TellMe and Siri for a second. What about the differences in properly deciphering what the guy spoke into text?

God forbid people here are trying to justify not using natural language over specific keywords... one is a superset of the other.

Denis W said,

Suppose you leave out syntax differences for TellMe and Siri for a second. What about the differences in properly deciphering what the guy spoke into text?

God forbid people here are trying to justify not using natural language over specific keywords... one is a superset of the other.

TellMe actually learns from mistakes and picks up accents as more people use it so, I'm not quite sure what your argument is regarding "properly deciphering" what the guy spoke.

neo158 said,

TellMe actually learns from mistakes and picks up accents as more people use it so, I'm not quite sure what your argument is regarding "properly deciphering" what the guy spoke.

Well, read the dictations up there. What he spoke and what TellMe transcribed to text, they don't match at all.

Now granted, it is possible the TechAU guy didn't use his WP7 device long enough for it to properly pick up his accent. But perhaps that's a possible disadvantage of a solution that transcribes voice locally instead of sending it to a server, where they have a massive pool of accents to work with.

Denis W said,

Well, read the dictations up there. What he spoke and what TellMe transcribed to text, they don't match at all.

Now granted, it is possible the TechAU guy didn't use his WP7 device long enough for it to properly pick up his accent. But perhaps that's a possible disadvantage of a solution that transcribes voice locally instead of sending it to a server, where they have a massive pool of accents to work with.

TellMe does use cloud services for transcribing text messages, here's the link to the Microsoft TellMe website: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us...y/default.aspx#tab=overview

My Windows Phone used to have problems picking up what I was saying, now it works perfectly because it's learned the way I speak.

From the Microsoft TellMe website:

"On the Microsoft Tellme cloud platform, businesses, developers and consumers all benefit from a network effect: Just like a search engine, it gets better as more people use it."

and

"For interactive voice response (IVR), continual learning is the primary benefit of the on-demand model when compared to an on-premise contact center solution. Flexibility, control, and headache-free maintenance add to the benefits of choosing the Microsoft Tellme IVR Service."

What I'm trying to say is that TellMe, just like Siri, learns and gets more accurate as more people use it.

Edited by neo158, Dec 13 2011, 3:34am :

Lets say you were going to go go buy a brand new car. Lets say it was a windows car, but before you could start it, you have to turn on the key, turn this dial over here, push this pedal down, then start it.

Or you could just buy an apple car... that you get it, and simply turn the key and it starts. no fancy tricks or commands needed.

Most people prefer no tricks.

I agree that WP7 has accent issues. I had the same issue with kinect but the new dashboard upgrade seems to be wonderful

Techomaniac said,
Here's my video response to the above video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqOsMiuid7E&noredirect=1

Its clearly not as bad it is being portrayed in the video by autech. Also you can use this on any 1st generation Windows Phone instead of upgrading to iPhone4S.

"bear in mind that you have to say certain commands before doing voice actions of WP7"... you could... but... why? the whole point is talk naturally... if not, then there is no point.

rippleman said,
"bear in mind that you have to say certain commands before doing voice actions of WP7"... you could... but... why? the whole point is talk naturally... if not, then there is no point.

So you're saying if it takes a slight change in behaviour or more effort to achieve your goal, then you shouldn't? That's a rather narrow-sighted perspective.

Tellme is a hit or miss for me. When I say, "Find Weather," it does one of several things.

A) Shows me the local weather and the 5 day forecast.

B) Launches the Weather Channel app.

C) Searches Bing for weather websites.

omgben said,
Tellme is a hit or miss for me. When I say, "Find Weather," it does one of several things.

A) Shows me the local weather and the 5 day forecast.

B) Launches the Weather Channel app.

C) Searches Bing for weather websites.


so... it just works?

Riva said,

so... it just works?

LOL, I guess you can say that. Either way, I end up getting the weather, just not in a consistant fashion. Like, when I tell it to open Angry Birds, it either opens the game, or it searches Bing for it.

What are we comparing? Speech recognition or the "virtual assistant" capabilities? because as far as speech recognition goes I believe that google and microsoft also get theirs right. its the fact that you can speak to siri pretty much whichever way you like that makes it appealing to some people.

C'mon!There is no comparison. Siri is much better for recognizing voice and natural speech. I'm glad this test was done in real time with both platforms. Nobody can say that he said it differently for 1 platform.

No, Jebadiah - My Android phone and any other Android or WP7 phone I see on the market does NOT use someone's datacenter to convert speech-to-text. Apple's Siri DEPENDS on it. Ask all of the iOS users who had trouble with Siri during the datacenter outage a few weeks ago. I can turn all of my radio functions off on my phone and it does voice recognition for navigation just fine.

You are more than welcome to prove me wrong.

ScottKin said,
No, Jebadiah - My Android phone and any other Android or WP7 phone I see on the market does NOT use someone's datacenter to convert speech-to-text. Apple's Siri DEPENDS on it. Ask all of the iOS users who had trouble with Siri during the datacenter outage a few weeks ago. I can turn all of my radio functions off on my phone and it does voice recognition for navigation just fine.

You are more than welcome to prove me wrong.

I own a Nexus One, so don't tell me what Android does or doesn't do. I don't think you have used Android's voice button on the keyboard, which is what I am referring to. It also has an app (Google search app, I believe, by Google) which converts speech to text and does a search on the keywords you spoke, which uses the same SaaS to convert speech to text. I stopped using the voice operations on my Android a month after playing around with it, because it rarely gets anything right.

What Apple has bought (Siri) is miles ahead of what Android and WP7 are doing here - converting speech to text and doing a search. Siri does natural language recognition and it makes out the context of what the speech as well. And, best of all, most of the time it's correct.

Edited by Jebadiah, Nov 26 2011, 2:03pm :

ScottKin said,
No, Jebadiah - My Android phone and any other Android or WP7 phone I see on the market does NOT use someone's datacenter to convert speech-to-text. Apple's Siri DEPENDS on it. Ask all of the iOS users who had trouble with Siri during the datacenter outage a few weeks ago. I can turn all of my radio functions off on my phone and it does voice recognition for navigation just fine.

You are more than welcome to prove me wrong.

Who cares? How often do you think that datacentre will be down, maybe once or twice a year.. if that? The superior experience offered for the 363 days of that year will more than make up for the occasional outages.

Jebadiah said,

I own a Nexus One, so don't tell me what Android does or doesn't do. I don't think you have used Android's voice button on the keyboard, which is what I am referring to. It also has an app (Goggles, I believe, by Google) which converts speech to text and does a search on the keywords you spoke, which uses the same SaaS to convert speech to text.

What Apple has bought (Siri) is miles ahead of what Android and WP7 are doing here - converting speech to text and doing a search. Siri does natural language recognition and it makes out the context of what the speech as well. And, best of all, most of the time it's correct.

Google's Voice Search is what you are speaking about. The Google Voice SERVICE is simply a Voicemail & Dialing Service. Google's Voice Search simply builds a query to be sent to Google's search engine. When Siri can't handle the voice command in doing NLP, NLP queries are sent to Apple's datacenters to do the rest of the NLP, and then builds the Voice responses to be sent back to the users iDevice. 70% of Siri's processing is done *at the datacenter*. For example: when you want to make a new appointment on your iDevice using Siri, as shown in the video, the voice NLP query is sent directly to Apple's datacenters, the NLP work is done there, the data is then queried against your iCal database, the query response is then formulated by Apple's datacenter and a intelligent-sounding audio response is created AT THE DATACENTER and then sent to you.

Yes, It's better than TellMe or Google Voice - only because there are thousands of servers at Apple Datacenters there to do what the hand-held device can't. And since there are so many people using iCal, Apple can afford to have some of their spare CPU cycles in their datacenters to handle what the iPhone + Siri can't.

ScottKin said,

Google's Voice Search is what you are speaking about. The Google Voice SERVICE is simply a Voicemail & Dialing Service. Google's Voice Search simply builds a query to be sent to Google's search engine. When Siri can't handle the voice command in doing NLP, NLP queries are sent to Apple's datacenters to do the rest of the NLP, and then builds the Voice responses to be sent back to the users iDevice. 70% of Siri's processing is done *at the datacenter*. For example: when you want to make a new appointment on your iDevice using Siri, as shown in the video, the voice NLP query is sent directly to Apple's datacenters, the NLP work is done there, the data is then queried against your iCal database, the query response is then formulated by Apple's datacenter and a intelligent-sounding audio response is created AT THE DATACENTER and then sent to you.

Yes, It's better than TellMe or Google Voice - only because there are thousands of servers at Apple Datacenters there to do what the hand-held device can't. And since there are so many people using iCal, Apple can afford to have some of their spare CPU cycles in their datacenters to handle what the iPhone + Siri can't.

WTF Did I say Google Voice?

I own a stock Android phone called the Nexus One. Not the other crap **** Android from OEMs which you buy.

If you have never used Voice commands on your Android device, then you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. It's utter crap just like the WP7. If you have this feature on your phone, it will NEVER work without an Internet connection.

With Google's Voice commands, you can say stuff like "send an SMS to Jay Leno I saw your show tonight and it was great!", it will open the Messaging application and fill in the fields for To and Body. It works, but rarely does everything right. Same way you can make calls to people in your address book, send e-mails and so on.

The difference is Siri does the same thing correctly and recognizes natural language. With Android and WP7, I have to say it like a bot, "Text George Lopez do you understand English?" instead of "ask George Lopez whether he understands English". The latter is what people want and Siri delivers.

Do you have a source for the 70% number? I highly doubt that is true because NLP takes a lot of processing power. Given that Apple is a battery freak, it is highly unlikely that they would do any of the processing on the phone other than for nouns that are stored on the phone.

Edited by Jebadiah, Nov 26 2011, 3:59pm :

Jebadiah said,

I own a Nexus One, so don't tell me what Android does or doesn't do. I don't think you have used Android's voice button on the keyboard, which is what I am referring to. It also has an app (Google search app, I believe, by Google) which converts speech to text and does a search on the keywords you spoke, which uses the same SaaS to convert speech to text. I stopped using the voice operations on my Android a month after playing around with it, because it rarely gets anything right.

What Apple has bought (Siri) is miles ahead of what Android and WP7 are doing here - converting speech to text and doing a search. Siri does natural language recognition and it makes out the context of what the speech as well. And, best of all, most of the time it's correct.

Well, I can tell from this post that you are absolutely clueless on this, so I'll try to help you. I actually *do* have a phone running Android Froyo (LG Vortex - inexpensive and gets the job done) and I actually have used Voice Search anf Google Phone.

Google's Voice Search does basic speech-to-text conversion. Google Goggles does VISUAL recognition, which is parsed-out to Google's datacenter and then the item is translated (if its text) or identified (if its non-text) and the result is sent back to the user. Simple. No fancy voice response. So, it is actually I who is wondering if you've really used an Android phone. If you have one or have owned one, the accept my apologies. Google Voice is Google's answer to Skype, providing net-based Telephone Central Exchange services and voicemail.

The reason that Siri works so well has very little to do with the iPhone itself or iOS 5; Siri sends data to Apple's datacenter to do ~80% of the NLP processing. When the iDevice is unable to handle the NLP request (again, which is ~80% of the time), the request gets sent to Apple's datacenter. In the example video above, the NLP request is sent to the datacenter, where the NLP request is broken-down, parsed and then acted-upon. In the calendar scenario, the "Create a meeting tomorrow at 10 AM" NLP request is passed to the datacenter, processed, referenced against iCal and a voice response is created AT THE DATACENTER and sent back to the iDevice; hence, the Siri process on the iDevice does VERY LITTLE of the processing. It's the back-end at the Datacenter.

Yes, Siri works. It works well. It works well because of Apple's forethought to use a datacenter for it's NLP work and not have the NLP bits on the device. It is *not* "manna from heaven". Apple wants you to think that it's all happening on-the-phone, when it really isn't; hence, my "Smoke and Mirrors" comment stands.

ScottKin said,

Well, I can tell from this post that you are absolutely clueless on this, so I'll try to help you. I actually *do* have a phone running Android Froyo (LG Vortex - inexpensive and gets the job done) and I actually have used Voice Search anf Google Phone.

Google's Voice Search does basic speech-to-text conversion. Google Goggles does VISUAL recognition, which is parsed-out to Google's datacenter and then the item is translated (if its text) or identified (if its non-text) and the result is sent back to the user. Simple. No fancy voice response. So, it is actually I who is wondering if you've really used an Android phone. If you have one or have owned one, the accept my apologies. Google Voice is Google's answer to Skype, providing net-based Telephone Central Exchange services and voicemail.

The reason that Siri works so well has very little to do with the iPhone itself or iOS 5; Siri sends data to Apple's datacenter to do ~80% of the NLP processing. When the iDevice is unable to handle the NLP request (again, which is ~80% of the time), the request gets sent to Apple's datacenter. In the example video above, the NLP request is sent to the datacenter, where the NLP request is broken-down, parsed and then acted-upon. In the calendar scenario, the "Create a meeting tomorrow at 10 AM" NLP request is passed to the datacenter, processed, referenced against iCal and a voice response is created AT THE DATACENTER and sent back to the iDevice; hence, the Siri process on the iDevice does VERY LITTLE of the processing. It's the back-end at the Datacenter.

Yes, Siri works. It works well. It works well because of Apple's forethought to use a datacenter for it's NLP work and not have the NLP bits on the device. It is *not* "manna from heaven". Apple wants you to think that it's all happening on-the-phone, when it really isn't; hence, my "Smoke and Mirrors" comment stands.

Fair enough.. Siri does it well enough for most people to believe it's happening on the phone, so they've obviously implemented it very well.

Your posts have an air of criticism about them though, or maybe it's just me? It seems like you're criticising Apple for having better voice recognition just because of the way it's implemented.

ScottKin said,

Well, I can tell from this post that you are absolutely clueless on this, so I'll try to help you. I actually *do* have a phone running Android Froyo (LG Vortex - inexpensive and gets the job done) and I actually have used Voice Search anf Google Phone.

Google's Voice Search does basic speech-to-text conversion. Google Goggles does VISUAL recognition, which is parsed-out to Google's datacenter and then the item is translated (if its text) or identified (if its non-text) and the result is sent back to the user. Simple. No fancy voice response. So, it is actually I who is wondering if you've really used an Android phone. If you have one or have owned one, the accept my apologies. Google Voice is Google's answer to Skype, providing net-based Telephone Central Exchange services and voicemail.

The reason that Siri works so well has very little to do with the iPhone itself or iOS 5; Siri sends data to Apple's datacenter to do ~80% of the NLP processing. When the iDevice is unable to handle the NLP request (again, which is ~80% of the time), the request gets sent to Apple's datacenter. In the example video above, the NLP request is sent to the datacenter, where the NLP request is broken-down, parsed and then acted-upon. In the calendar scenario, the "Create a meeting tomorrow at 10 AM" NLP request is passed to the datacenter, processed, referenced against iCal and a voice response is created AT THE DATACENTER and sent back to the iDevice; hence, the Siri process on the iDevice does VERY LITTLE of the processing. It's the back-end at the Datacenter.

Yes, Siri works. It works well. It works well because of Apple's forethought to use a datacenter for it's NLP work and not have the NLP bits on the device. It is *not* "manna from heaven". Apple wants you to think that it's all happening on-the-phone, when it really isn't; hence, my "Smoke and Mirrors" comment stands.

I wonder if you are being ignorant and stupid on purpose about Android.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGbYVvU0Z5s&sns=em

Let us not forget, everyone, that Siri is a Client/Server (SaaS) service. Siri depends on an active 3G or higher connection, uses Apple's datacenters and servers to do most of the natural language processing, and FWIK very little of the audio response that the end-user receives is actually generated by the phone itself.

Smoke and Mirrors INDEED!

ScottKin said,
Let us not forget, everyone, that Siri is a Client/Server (SaaS) service. Siri depends on an active 3G or higher connection, uses Apple's datacenters and servers to do most of the natural language processing, and FWIK very little of the audio response that the end-user receives is actually generated by the phone itself.

Smoke and Mirrors INDEED!

What's done right is done right. Android too uses a SaaS to convert speech to text, but faces the same difficulties as WP7. Siri simply does it right for iOS.

By the way, guess who's cloud services Apple is using? Microsoft's Azure and Amazon's AWS.

ScottKin said,
Let us not forget, everyone, that Siri is a Client/Server (SaaS) service. Siri depends on an active 3G or higher connection, uses Apple's datacenters and servers to do most of the natural language processing, and FWIK very little of the audio response that the end-user receives is actually generated by the phone itself.

Smoke and Mirrors INDEED!

I googled "wp7 tellme" and some sites indicate that Tellme also uses the cloud while others make no mention of it... does it work without an internet connection?

In any event, not sure how that's smoke and mirrors as the end result is the same to the user.. doesn't matter if the input is processed by the phone itself or some cloud server.

Hardcore Til I Die said,

I googled "wp7 tellme" and some sites indicate that Tellme also uses the cloud while others make no mention of it... does it work without an internet connection?

In any event, not sure how that's smoke and mirrors as the end result is the same to the user.. doesn't matter if the input is processed by the phone itself or some cloud server.

It's a pure case of "Smoke and Mirrors" if someone is trying to say that one device is superior to another in one feature where that feature depends on A SERVER to give the supposedly-superior device it's whiz-bang feature. That would be like saying that my Outloook's email features are superior to Fred's iMail's features because I use a Comcast email server.

What part of that are people not able to wrap their heads around?

ScottKin said,

It's a pure case of "Smoke and Mirrors" if someone is trying to say that one device is superior to another in one feature where that feature depends on A SERVER to give the supposedly-superior device it's whiz-bang feature. That would be like saying that my Outloook's email features are superior to Fred's iMail's features because I use a Comcast email server.

What part of that are people not able to wrap their heads around?

Sometimes having a good microphone helps a lot more than a massive server. Sometimes having control of the hardware goes a long way in ensuring that you provide a consistent and expected performance.

ScottKin said,

It's a pure case of "Smoke and Mirrors" if someone is trying to say that one device is superior to another in one feature where that feature depends on A SERVER to give the supposedly-superior device it's whiz-bang feature. That would be like saying that my Outloook's email features are superior to Fred's iMail's features because I use a Comcast email server.

What part of that are people not able to wrap their heads around?

Because people don't care about the implementation, they just care about the end result?

If Siri has better voice recognition then Siri has better voice recognition. To me, as an end user, I don't give a damn how or why it has better voice recognition, just that it does.

Really, so what if it's local or server side? Especially since it's on a mobile device with limited battery life and computing power.

Something like voice dictation in Windows is a good example of a solution that works without sending anything over a network connection, but in practice it required training on my part to get it to recognize my voice correctly. Siri just worked out of the box, and anyone who knows me can attest to my not-so-clear speech patterns.

I'll acknowledge that server-side solutions aren't perfect, as I've noticed times where Siri takes a long time to interpret a command from Apple's servers. But most of the time, it works well.

Hardcore Til I Die said,

does it work without an internet connection?

Yes, it does work without an internet connection. I just tested it.

Hardcore Til I Die said,

I googled "wp7 tellme" and some sites indicate that Tellme also uses the cloud while others make no mention of it... does it work without an internet connection?

In any event, not sure how that's smoke and mirrors as the end result is the same to the user.. doesn't matter if the input is processed by the phone itself or some cloud server.

As far as i have tried, the "call" and "open" voice commands on WindowsPhone work without internet connection. But for transcribing SMS it needs internet connection.

ScottKin said,

It's a pure case of "Smoke and Mirrors" if someone is trying to say that one device is superior to another in one feature where that feature depends on A SERVER to give the supposedly-superior device it's whiz-bang feature. That would be like saying that my Outloook's email features are superior to Fred's iMail's features because I use a Comcast email server.

What part of that are people not able to wrap their heads around?

No it's not and you gave a bad example. It's really you not liking how Apple skins its cat, so you cry, "smoke and mirrors!" Basically, you have a difference of opinion. Some of Tellme's functionality, like transcribing a text, requires it to use a server, but that's not a palor trick either.

Smoke and mirrors are when someone tries to trick people into thinking that something that is fake isn't, or something that isn't really there is. It's to deceive people. To commit fraud. In the context of hardware and software, it's basically vaporware. Think Milli Vanilli, the Phantom console, or that time my old roommate tried to pass off screenshots of a website he made in Photoshop to investors as an actual, real, and fully functioning website.

You can even angle a mirror near a pile of coins, and it looks like you have more money than you actually do!

It's a neat trick, really.

How Siri works is no secret. It's public knowledge that its use requires an internet connection. Apple isn't trying to pull a fast one on anybody. They're not lying and saying it's all done on the phone. The technology is so fast, and the experience is so seamless then why put it all on the phone? Also, as others have said, who cares how Siri or any other speech-to-text's backend works as long as it works?

There are lots of offerings for various platforms that can do more than siri, but there's one important thing that siri gets right - voice recognition! It's undefeated in terms of actually recognising what people say. The fact I'm from the uk is probably a factor there.

Hardcore Til I Die said,
There are lots of offerings for various platforms that can do more than siri, but there's one important thing that siri gets right - voice recognition! It's undefeated in terms of actually recognising what people say. The fact I'm from the uk is probably a factor there.
I wonder how does Google's voice recognition compare to Siri

Hardcore Til I Die said,
There are lots of offerings for various platforms that can do more than siri, but there's one important thing that siri gets right - voice recognition! It's undefeated in terms of actually recognising what people say. The fact I'm from the uk is probably a factor there.

People seem to harp on about it's voice recognition capability, but my gf and I were playing with it today and ended up in pure frustration. Even 'call mum' with two similar 'mum' contact entries being 'mum' and 'mum malaysia' stumped it. It asked us to choose which contact but when we said 'mum' again it just wouldn't work.

I don't think it's a fair comparison if the person doing the comparison is too retarded to speak into the windows phone properly, I'd just say he's a ****ing tool quite honestly.

n_K said,
I don't think it's a fair comparison if the person doing the comparison is too retarded to speak into the windows phone properly, I'd just say he's a ****ing tool quite honestly.

Rofl!!! are you serious? Both devices lay side by side, and he asked both of them to perform the same actions..it's not like he spoke directly into the iPhone but not the windows one.

Clearly the windows phone offering is lacking.

Hardcore Til I Die said,

Rofl!!! are you serious? Both devices lay side by side, and he asked both of them to perform the same actions..it's not like he spoke directly into the iPhone but not the windows one.

Clearly the windows phone offering is lacking.


Windows Phone fanboys, living in denial as always..

Hardcore Til I Die said,

Rofl!!! are you serious? Both devices lay side by side, and he asked both of them to perform the same actions..it's not like he spoke directly into the iPhone but not the windows one.

Clearly the windows phone offering is lacking.

No, the video is not accurate. This is the most retarted comparision I have seen. As you need to say specific words in Windows Phone before you can perform tasks. For example,

Find
Text
Open
Call

If you dont say these words before your commands then its not gonna work properly. Thats the way it is. So when making comparision these words should have been used. To top it off Neowin has written an article over this unfair comparison.

Edited by Techomaniac, Nov 26 2011, 5:45pm :

Techomaniac said,

No, the video is not accurate. This is the most retarted comparision I have seen. As you need to say specific words in Windows Phone before you can perform tasks. For example,

Find
Text
Open
Call

If you dont say these words before your commands then its not gonna work properly. Thats the way it is. So when making comparision these words should have been used. To top it off Neowin has written an article over this unfair competition.

Hello?? The windows phone can't even recognise the words he used, so the commands wouldn't work either

Hardcore Til I Die said,

Hello?? The windows phone can't even recognise the words he used, so the commands wouldn't work either

You must wait for my video. I have a desi accent but it works well for me.

Hardcore Til I Die said,

Hello?? The windows phone can't even recognise the words he used, so the commands wouldn't work either


Until a few weeks back, the iphone didn't understand any australian, so yeah, which is worse ?

Hardcore Til I Die said,

Hello?? The windows phone can't even recognise the words he used, so the commands wouldn't work either

Works all the time for me, this was an unfair comparison because the way commands are interpreted by each phone is completely different. If you just speak naturally to it then all a Windows Phone will do is search.

Huh, and WT(Bleep)...

TellMe is a VoiceXML server technology, that has NO inherent interpretation technology.
Siri is a server application interface to a VoiceXML technology server.

How could anyone be so stupid to even try to compare them?

What are the next Articles?
• Apache vs Chrome - Apache is a bad web browser?
• Crysis vs ATI Radeon 5800 - the ATI is not a fun game?
• iOS vs the ARM Cortex CPU - the Cortex CPU is not user friendly?
• The V8 engine vs the Corvette - the V8 fails to corner well?

(DO YOU SEE HOW INSANE THIS ARTICLE IS YET?)

Wow, just wow... There is lack of understanding, and then there is just plain chosen ignorance. Ignorance wins again...


As for 'functionality', Siri is a much 'smarter' application interface to the voice technology. This is known by everyone that has a freaking clue. However, the actually technology to convert the voice to text of TellMe is rather good, and existed before the freaking iPhone.

One thing the iPhone cannot do, is operate without touching the phone, which is one feature WP7 has a usability advantage. (It is enabled by default for headsets, but can also be enabled for speaker phone, Speech Confirmations Always On.) Then all messaging you receive the phone out loud asks you to respond if you want to read it, and if so, you can reply and send without ever touching the phone, even with the phone sitting on the table across the room.

WP7 can add a Siri Applicatoin to it anytime, as Microsoft puts work into an intelligent application interface to TellMe, as the current interface is rather limited. However, the application interface technology existed BEFORE Siri on Android and there was an older variation on Windows Mobile, so even though Siri is a rather good interface technology, it is not new.

This is really sad that once again more ignorance is throwing away the work of many others that came before, and giving the credit to Apple.

Just voice technology alone, Windows Phone was doing voice command technology on the actual device, without a server based VoiceXML technology back in 2002, years before the iPhone existed, and several years before the iPhone itself could even do basic voice dialing, that free non-smartphones have been able to do since 2005.

VoiceXML technology and variations existed back in the mid 1990s, with Microsoft being one of the leaders in Voice Server technology that paved the way for the sever technologies Siri uses, and there is even Microsoft Voice technology in the actual Siri Voice servers.

Yet here we are comparing non-compatible things, and praising Apple for putting the cherry on the sundae and proclaiming them as the brilliant chef.

Again, this article is holy cow insane...

Edited by thenetavenger, Nov 26 2011, 11:20am :

Its being compared since the guy in the first video said Siri is something that already exists in WP7. The second video is a video to show that's simply not true.

thenetavenger said,

Wow, just wow... There is lack of understanding, and then there is just plain chosen ignorance. Ignorance wins again...

Exactly. For Craig Mundie to imply that WP7 has had the functionality of Siri for about a year, is like you said a lack of understanding or ignorance. Also, your entire post makes it seem as if you neglected to watch the initial video and failed to understand the context in which the second video (maybe OTT) was made.

In regards to praising Apple, as a consumer (of not just Apple products), I'm only going to appreciate the functionality of the end-product rather than the history behind it. To be fair, I didn't find this article to be as over-complimentary of Apple as you claim it to be anyway. Could you quote me those parts please?

Edited by Manish, Nov 26 2011, 1:58pm :

thenetavenger said,
Huh, and WT(Bleep)...

TellMe is a VoiceXML server technology, that has NO inherent interpretation technology.
Siri is a server application interface to a VoiceXML technology server.

How could anyone be so stupid to even try to compare them?

What are the next Articles?
• Apache vs Chrome - Apache is a bad web browser?
• Crysis vs ATI Radeon 5800 - the ATI is not a fun game?
• iOS vs the ARM Cortex CPU - the Cortex CPU is not user friendly?
• The V8 engine vs the Corvette - the V8 fails to corner well?

(DO YOU SEE HOW INSANE THIS ARTICLE IS YET?)

Wow, just wow... There is lack of understanding, and then there is just plain chosen ignorance. Ignorance wins again...


As for 'functionality', Siri is a much 'smarter' application interface to the voice technology. This is known by everyone that has a freaking clue. However, the actually technology to convert the voice to text of TellMe is rather good, and existed before the freaking iPhone.

One thing the iPhone cannot do, is operate without touching the phone, which is one feature WP7 has a usability advantage. (It is enabled by default for headsets, but can also be enabled for speaker phone, Speech Confirmations Always On.) Then all messaging you receive the phone out loud asks you to respond if you want to read it, and if so, you can reply and send without ever touching the phone, even with the phone sitting on the table across the room.

WP7 can add a Siri Applicatoin to it anytime, as Microsoft puts work into an intelligent application interface to TellMe, as the current interface is rather limited. However, the application interface technology existed BEFORE Siri on Android and there was an older variation on Windows Mobile, so even though Siri is a rather good interface technology, it is not new.

This is really sad that once again more ignorance is throwing away the work of many others that came before, and giving the credit to Apple.

Just voice technology alone, Windows Phone was doing voice command technology on the actual device, without a server based VoiceXML technology back in 2002, years before the iPhone existed, and several years before the iPhone itself could even do basic voice dialing, that free non-smartphones have been able to do since 2005.

VoiceXML technology and variations existed back in the mid 1990s, with Microsoft being one of the leaders in Voice Server technology that paved the way for the sever technologies Siri uses, and there is even Microsoft Voice technology in the actual Siri Voice servers.

Yet here we are comparing non-compatible things, and praising Apple for putting the cherry on the sundae and proclaiming them as the brilliant chef.

Again, this article is holy cow insane...

How can people be so stupid as to try to compare two voice input and output technologies? Well duh...

Microsoft's own member of staff compared the two in the video. Maybe you should be directing your wall at him rather than the good people of Neowin?

Hardcore Til I Die said,

How can people be so stupid as to try to compare two voice input and output technologies? Well duh...

Microsoft's own member of staff compared the two in the video. Maybe you should be directing your wall at him rather than the good people of Neowin?

Thank you.

thenetavenger said,

One thing the iPhone cannot do, is operate without touching the phone, which is one feature WP7 has a usability advantage. (It is enabled by default for headsets, but can also be enabled for speaker phone, Speech Confirmations Always On.) Then all messaging you receive the phone out loud asks you to respond if you want to read it, and if so, you can reply and send without ever touching the phone, even with the phone sitting on the table across the room.

iPhone 4S Settings - Siri - turn on Raise To Speak
U dont need to touch iPhone anymore. Just raise the iPhone to ur ears, the proximity sensor will sense it and activate Siri

WiCkeD SaM said,

iPhone 4S Settings - Siri - turn on Raise To Speak
U dont need to touch iPhone anymore. Just raise the iPhone to ur ears, the proximity sensor will sense it and activate Siri


mm you are still touching it to raise it dont' you??

WiCkeD SaM said,

iPhone 4S Settings - Siri - turn on Raise To Speak
U dont need to touch iPhone anymore. Just raise the iPhone to ur ears, the proximity sensor will sense it and activate Siri

You don't even need to raise the WP7 phone.

When you're driving, this is a god send, as it is illegal in Australia to operate your mobile phone.

If you're connected via bluetooth, the WP7 phone will read you the message and you can reply all via handsfree.

WiCkeD SaM said,

iPhone 4S Settings - Siri - turn on Raise To Speak
U dont need to touch iPhone anymore. Just raise the iPhone to ur ears, the proximity sensor will sense it and activate Siri

But you're still touching the phone to raise it to activate Siri as others have said.

With Windows Phone I can recieve a text message, have TellMe read it and reply to the message without even touching the phone or headset to activate speech recognition.

It's very amusing to read all the comments of Microsoft/WP7 fanboy. I have to say the same for Apple fanboys, just waiting for their comments. They are too slow today.

argentum76 said,
It's very amusing to read all the comments of Microsoft/WP7 fanboy. I have to say the same for Apple fanboys, just waiting for their comments. They are too slow today.

its just funny when comparisons are made to obviously show how iphones are better.. its annoying because how do we even know the windows phone 7 was changed to australian english in the language settings?

I just love how its a guy with a thick accent and none of the variables are shown to be equal.. it was completely biased towards the iphone.. Did you also notice how the Windows phone was in "battery saver mode" which means it shuts down location services and a bunch of background applications.. this could even effect the test

Lachlan said,

its just funny when comparisons are made to obviously show how iphones are better.. its annoying because how do we even know the windows phone 7 was changed to australian english in the language settings?

I just love how its a guy with a thick accent and none of the variables are shown to be equal.. it was completely biased towards the iphone.. Did you also notice how the Windows phone was in "battery saver mode" which means it shuts down location services and a bunch of background applications.. this could even effect the test

Uhhh...

1. I could understand that accent just fine, it appears to be normal Australian English (at least it sounds as close as our fellow Aussie editor Tim lol). Don't expect the bottom line to be just North American English accents
2. Listen closely and you can pick out the WP7 device reading back the command in an Australian accent
3. Not sure how battery saver mode affects voice recognition, unless doing so cuts off a connection to servers that can better recognize voice commands?

That aside, interesting that WP7 has a battery saver mode.

Typing this for the 3rd time on my iPad, hopefully it does not crash again...

I could speak some obscure words using a thick accent, and I could probably trip-up Siri. But really, skrillex? (BTW, the iPad tried to auto correct that to 'skilled', isn't that a problem?) what were the test conditions this test was run under? The iPhone does not stream music from the Internet the way Zune does, only from the local library or music you store in your private icloud library. Zune will stream from the Internet even if you have not purchased the music. If the iPhone has the band's music in the library, but the WP7 does not, then Siri is at an advantage because it can do pattern matching against the limited number of music on the library, while the WP7 has to search all music of all bands that are available on the marketplace. Try searching a few 100 song names, vs the Zune which has to search millions. If you have a list of bands, any words following the "play" command can easily be matched using algorithms such as soundex to pattern match against known words. But the test conveniently omits information about what the known data set it.

Was Simone Arnold in the contacts of the WP7 like it was for the iPhone? If not, of course it would not find Simone to send her a txt.

But if we are comparing the limitations of each, why don't they show trying to launch applications using Siri? Why not show saying "open safari" and "open Internet explorer"? Or is this specifically crafted to show one program running perfectly, and another running poorly? Tellme will find sports scores, but Siri will not - I do this all the time. Why did they not show that? WP7 does not support the pattern matching for creating a meeting, but Siri does. And yet, they selected the case that Siri supports, and not the cases that siri does not.

And of course, neowin (auto corrected as no win and neocon on my iPad, but typing it on my WP7 worked just fine) just blindly accepts the conclusions of the referenced site, without any of their own investigation.

This appears to be very contrived, using only commands Siri knows, ignoring the commands only Tellme knows, with a questionable data set. WP7 can be better with accents other than standard US English, but there are too many questions to call WP7 'rubbish.'

1. There is no support for playing music using the voice recognition feature on WP7. (Was a bit surprised by this, but here's the source: http://www.microsoft.com/windo...use-speech-on-my-phone.aspx)

2. It'd just be stupid not to have "Simone Arnold" as a contact in both phones. The reason why it didn't work is because you always need to say "Text..." for WP7 to interpret it correctly; you don't need to start with a command on Siri, you can say it however you want.

3. The point wasn't to show the command limitations of either OS (if it was the sole purpose, then TechAU is being silly). The point is that Siri simply has better natural language understanding and context awareness than WP7's current offering. Anyone who argues against this latter point is in denial and wrong. The fact that Craig Mundie, Microsoft's Chief Research and Strategy officer, thinks that the only thing MS could learn from Apple (in regards to Siri) is marketing just seems arrogant and/or ignorant. (Of course, both companies could learn from one another, not only in terms of voice recognition but other features too.)

4. No-one is calling WP7 rubbish. Calm down.

5. I don't see why you needed to mention your autocorrect issues. Once you've told the iPad to keep "Neowin" instead of letting it be corrected, it will remember it. No it isn't a problem that "skrillex" is autocorrected since it isn't a contact name (presumably) or a word found in the dictionary. Again, the iPad will learn "Skrillex" if you tell it not to be corrected. Also, if your iPad or Safari keeps crashing, feel free to open up a thread under the appropriate forum and I, or others, may be able to help you; the comments section is not usually a good place for that sort of thing.

Yes, as always it seems apple is a better choice. Though according to another article here or elsewhere on the web, Apple bought Siri after removing it from the app store. So to be fair, is Siri a true Aapple product, I say no. Also Siri has been in development a bit longer than Microsoft's Tellme. Yes Microsoft's procts do tend to tank right out of the gate (most of their products, I.e. Vista). So to be honest this really is not a fair comparison, and wasn't Siri , when in the app store, available to all iOS devices?

microjunk said,
Yes, as always it seems apple is a better choice. Though according to another article here or elsewhere on the web, Apple bought Siri after removing it from the app store. So to be fair, is Siri a true Aapple product, I say no. Also Siri has been in development a bit longer than Microsoft's Tellme. Yes Microsoft's procts do tend to tank right out of the gate (most of their products, I.e. Vista). So to be honest this really is not a fair comparison, and wasn't Siri , when in the app store, available to all iOS devices?

Most of their products tank? Um...

M_Lyons10 said,

Most of their products tank? Um...

lol and the example he gives is Vista.. hahaha.. like what? a 5 year old product that sold well but not as well as expected is your example about how all their products tank?

microjunk said,
Yes, as always it seems apple is a better choice. Though according to another article here or elsewhere on the web, Apple bought Siri after removing it from the app store. So to be fair, is Siri a true Aapple product, I say no. Also Siri has been in development a bit longer than Microsoft's Tellme. Yes Microsoft's procts do tend to tank right out of the gate (most of their products, I.e. Vista). So to be honest this really is not a fair comparison, and wasn't Siri , when in the app store, available to all iOS devices?

Really, Tellme. Networks, Inc. was founded in 1999 and Siri was founded in 2007. Looks to me like TellMe was founded before Siri and has been in development longer.

Tellme Networks was acquired by Microsoft on March 14, 2007 and Siri was acquired by Apple Inc. on April 28, 2010.

neo158 said,

Really, Tellme. Networks, Inc. was founded in 1999 and Siri was founded in 2007. Looks to me like TellMe was founded before Siri and has been in development longer.

Tellme Networks was acquired by Microsoft on March 14, 2007 and Siri was acquired by Apple Inc. on April 28, 2010.

From Wikipedia:

With Siri, Apple is using the results of over 40 years of research funded by DARPA via SRI International's Artificial Intelligence Center through the Personalized Assistant that Learns Program and Cognitive Agent that Learns and Organizes Program CALO.

SIRI is based off of the largest venture into Artificial Intelligence mankind has ever undertaken. It's been in development a /bit/ longer...

This is a silly comparison - WP7 texts people when you say "Text ___" - sure, it isn't as "natural" as Siri, but it works. Also, they conveniently didn't do anything that WP7 is good at - like launching apps by voice. IIRC, Siri can't do that. They also didn't do things like "Weather in somecity", or "Find movies", where WP7 lists movies that are showing nearby, along with their ratings.

Siri does trump TellMe overall, but it's not *as* far as this article would have you believe. What Tellme does, it does *really* well. Hopefully Microsoft will be able to reach the level of Siri in short order.

Agreed on the apps part, though there must be some technical reason as to why Siri won't allow apps to be launched. As for the 'find movies' statement, that wouldn't have worked on Siri to begin with due to only supporting US locations for now.

Differences in features aside, there is still the point of Tellme not doing as good of a job transcribing audio to text as Siri, at least for Australian English.

Denis W said,
Agreed on the apps part, though there must be some technical reason as to why Siri won't allow apps to be launched. As for the 'find movies' statement, that wouldn't have worked on Siri to begin with due to only supporting US locations for now.

Differences in features aside, there is still the point of Tellme not doing as good of a job transcribing audio to text as Siri, at least for Australian English.

Wonder how Siri would fare with an Indian accent, the bane of all voice-recognition software.

TellMe is very hit-or-miss with this, although it's accuracy does seem to have improved lately. Earlier, 'Text Mum' would work, but 'Text Dad' did not. Baffling!

NateB1 said,
This is a silly comparison - WP7 texts people when you say "Text ___" - sure, it isn't as "natural" as Siri, but it works. Also, they conveniently didn't do anything that WP7 is good at - like launching apps by voice. IIRC, Siri can't do that. They also didn't do things like "Weather in somecity", or "Find movies", where WP7 lists movies that are showing nearby, along with their ratings.

Siri does trump TellMe overall, but it's not *as* far as this article would have you believe. What Tellme does, it does *really* well. Hopefully Microsoft will be able to reach the level of Siri in short order.


Windows Phone also allows one to text someone when one says "Send text to . . ." This video is incorrect on that example.

NateB1 said,
This is a silly comparison - WP7 texts people when you say "Text ___" - sure, it isn't as "natural" as Siri, but it works. Also, they conveniently didn't do anything that WP7 is good at - like launching apps by voice. IIRC, Siri can't do that. They also didn't do things like "Weather in somecity", or "Find movies", where WP7 lists movies that are showing nearby, along with their ratings.

Siri does trump TellMe overall, but it's not *as* far as this article would have you believe. What Tellme does, it does *really* well. Hopefully Microsoft will be able to reach the level of Siri in short order.

Even if it doesn't support the command, it should still recognise the text no?

I have an app for Android called Voice Actions, and when it doesn't recognise a particular command, it still recognises the text used but just google searches it.

Come on guys, I have a WP7 and I can tell that Siri is far superior, don't hide the sun with a finger, Microsoft needs to improve TellMe

NateB1 said,
This is a silly comparison - WP7 texts people when you say "Text ___" - sure, it isn't as "natural" as Siri, but it works. Also, they conveniently didn't do anything that WP7 is good at - like launching apps by voice. IIRC, Siri can't do that. They also didn't do things like "Weather in somecity", or "Find movies", where WP7 lists movies that are showing nearby, along with their ratings.

Siri does trump TellMe overall, but it's not *as* far as this article would have you believe. What Tellme does, it does *really* well. Hopefully Microsoft will be able to reach the level of Siri in short order.


Exactly. They designed the voice commands to give Siri the edge. Does Microsoft have some work to do? Sure, but it's nowhere near this bad...

LOL at comparing a 200 dollar (on contract) phone vs a Free on contract phone.. lets find a phone thats 200 dollars cheaper then the windows phone and compare it..

off contract.. Iphone 4S =$649 cheapest
off contract any windows phone (they all have voice control) = $349 samsung focus at at&t

300 dollar difference..........................

LOL at this comparison..


NateB1 said,
This is a silly comparison - WP7 texts people when you say "Text ___" - sure, it isn't as "natural" as Siri, but it works. Also, they conveniently didn't do anything that WP7 is good at - like launching apps by voice. IIRC, Siri can't do that. They also didn't do things like "Weather in somecity", or "Find movies", where WP7 lists movies that are showing nearby, along with their ratings.

Siri does trump TellMe overall, but it's not *as* far as this article would have you believe. What Tellme does, it does *really* well. Hopefully Microsoft will be able to reach the level of Siri in short order.

I think Microsoft will be developing or exceed what Siri is currenltly offering in their upcoming Windows Phone 8. From what I experienced with Siri it's pretty accurate but it's far from perfect.

daniel_rh said,
Come on guys, I have a WP7 and I can tell that Siri is far superior, don't hide the sun with a finger, Microsoft needs to improve TellMe

This is clearly true. Thanks for being a breath of fresh honest air.

daniel_rh said,
Come on guys, I have a WP7 and I can tell that Siri is far superior, don't hide the sun with a finger, Microsoft needs to improve TellMe

Give Microsoft time. I bet they are cooking something big with TellMe in Windows Phone.

Callum said,

Windows Phone also allows one to text someone when one says "Send text to . . ." This video is incorrect on that example.
Microsoft claims they are the same. So it is ok to act as if they ARE the same.