Microsoft's XP SP3 Patch Fixes Anti-Virus Glitch

Microsoft issued a hotfix for Windows XP Service Pack 3 last week that it says "could resolve" a Windows registry corruption problem associated with third-party security software. The problem was first discovered just over a month ago, and it notably affected users of Symantec's Norton Antivirus suite of products.

Some users who installed XP SP3 reported seeing garbled system entries that cluttered the Windows registry. The corruption in the registry led to problems such as lost Internet and wireless connections, along with uninitiated restarts caused by sporadic registry subkeys.

Microsoft provided an explanation for the problem in a Knowledgebase posting on Friday. The issue "occurs when the Fixccs.exe process is called during the Windows XP SP3 installation," the KB article explains. "This process creates some intermediate registry subkeys, and it later deletes these subkeys. In some cases, some antivirus applications may not let the Fixccs.exe process delete these intermediate registry subkeys." When the problem occurs, "certain applications" within Windows, such as "Device Manager and Network Connections" may be unable to function, Redmond added.

News Source: ENT News

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11 Comments

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who needs a virus or a worm when you can pay symantec or Mcstuffie to buggar your pc for a fee . This is why i recommend AntiVir or Avast they are free for home use and do pretty damn well in the icsa and VB100 tests

Freakin' Symantec.

First, they bitch and whine when they're getting locked out of the kernel and system services, and now they find ways to corrupt vital system files.

If viruses won't compromise your system, Symantec will corrupt it.

I just do...not...trust...any software that wants to take over basic system functions.

(cork1958 said @ #4)
Anybody that installs Symantec crap on their systems deserves what they get from that crapware company!!

Amen to that.

The poor thing is that most of them perceive Norton as The Antivirus and aren't aware of the alternatives. This is mainly due to Symantec software (call it crap if you want, but it's merely a bloat) being preinstalled with most of the PCs and laptops lately. After three months of free use they get all kind of warnings that they MUST renew their subscription (or die) and this is just how the noose of the poor PC experience tights around their necks.

(buletov said @ #4.2)
The poor thing is that most of them perceive Norton as The Antivirus and aren't aware of the alternatives. This is mainly due to Symantec software (call it crap if you want, but it's merely a bloat) being preinstalled with most of the PCs and laptops lately. After three months of free use they get all kind of warnings that they MUST renew their subscription (or die) and this is just how the noose of the poor PC experience tights around their necks.

Firstly, Symantec doesn't force you to continue using Norton Antivirus. It is entirely your prerogative as to whether you keep using it or not. Also, Norton Antivirus 2008 is a huge improvement on previous versions. I was skeptical at first, but took the plunge and am glad I did.

In the case of Symantec, it looks like a case of 'mud sticks' - people will continue to assume that a product is bad even when they start to improve it. In my opinion, these kind of assumptions can't be made, and people should gather the facts before jumping to conclusions. It becomes rather tiring to see the same comments such as 'Norton sux', when you know that said comments are false.

Smctainsh

(tereshchenko said @ #2)
That's not registry problem - that's Symantec's antivirus problem.

This problem occurs when the Fixccs.exe process is called during the Windows XP SP3 installation. This process creates some intermediate registry subkeys, and it later deletes these subkeys. In some cases, some antivirus applications may not let the Fixccs.exe process delete these intermediate registry subkeys.

When this problem occurs, certain applications, such as Device Manager and Network Connections, may be unable to enumerate the device or the connection instances. These applications will report a blank status even though devices and connections still function as expected.

It's a problem straight from major anti-virus retailers. So, how comes this is not a Windows problem? Because like the driver manufacturers, it's their fault that they didn't update their software to be compatible with the latest operative system.

(Azmodan said @ #2.1)

It's a problem straight from major anti-virus retailers. So, how comes this is not a Windows problem? Because like the driver manufacturers, it's their fault that they didn't update their software to be compatible with the latest operative system.


What's an "operative system"?