Mobile broadband traffic nearly tripled in 2010

According to Cisco's Visual Networking Index concerning mobile data across the globe, there was 2.6 times more traffic in 2010 over 2009. All of this data came out to be roughly 237 petabytes per month, which, according to Cisco, is the equivalent storage space of 59,250,000 DVDs in the span of one month. To put it into greater perspective, Cisco says that 400 Terabytes is all it would take to maintain a digital library of every book ever written in any language. 237 petabytes would hold over 400 copies of said library. 

The report went on to show that mobile broadband speeds have doubled since 2009. In 2010, the average speed was 215 kbps compared to 101 kbps in 2009. Connections on Smartphones were even faster. The average smartphone speed was 1040 kbps in 2010, which is up from 2009 when the average speed was just 625 kbps. Among smartphone users, Cisco found that 10% accounted for 60% of all smartphone traffic. Regular phones still make up the majority of the market, but Cisco found they only use on average about 3.3MB per month compared to the average smartphone which uses about 79MB per month.

Cisco estimates that by 2015, mobile traffic will reach 6.3 exabytes per month. They say that 5 exabytes would be all that is needed to store every word ever spoken. They think that each smartphone will consume 1.3GB of data each month and connection speeds will average 2.2 Mbps which should make it easier to consume more data. 

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14 Comments

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Na, in Canada we are droping back from the base 500MB per month to 50MB, and we are also getting tri-sim (60Mbit) access so we'll get to the 50MB of data cap in around 5 seconds. Overages are only $2.50 per MB unless roaming - then its and extra $3.25 per 100KB

Ruciz said,
Na, in Canada we are droping back from the base 500MB per month to 50MB, and we are also getting tri-sim (60Mbit) access so we'll get to the 50MB of data cap in around 5 seconds. Overages are only $2.50 per MB unless roaming - then its and extra $3.25 per 100KB

Holy sh--! that's terrible

djdanster said,

Holy sh--! that's terrible

I wasn't serious. But I wouldn't be surprised. I have a colleague who's getting over 50Mbps through the cell towers with trials of dual sim data.

There has got to be a new technology sooner or later that is going to reduce the load of the networks - I honestly don't know how at this stage but the duplication of data due to the internet is massive and that takes up huge amounts of resources. Just think of the electricity bills all combined?

Like they say there will be enough data exchange that it could have recorded every word ever spoken and we're burning through that in a year (well expected too)

Interesting statistics

xXTOKERXx said,
There has got to be a new technology sooner or later that is going to reduce the load of the networks - I honestly don't know how at this stage but the duplication of data due to the internet is massive and that takes up huge amounts of resources. Just think of the electricity bills all combined?

Like they say there will be enough data exchange that it could have recorded every word ever spoken and we're burning through that in a year (well expected too)

Interesting statistics

Actually, the new technology is in place. Its called green servers. TBH, a server running 20 years ago with 20GB of space and 20GB of throughput uses likely the same amount of power as a server running today with 20,000GB of space and 20,000GB of througput. Fibre uses light pulses, servers use only power needed to deliver content and HDDs are made solid state which cuts down on heat creation which is the primary loss of power when using electronics. Even platter drives use a lot less power today than they did. Look at a sticker and see what the A is rated at. most drives are under 0.5A today, I remember 20GB drives pulled 2-3A

tonyunreal said,
Isn't 2.6 times more "nearly quadrupled"?

2 times = doubled, 3 time = tripled, 4 times = quadrupled. Using rounding 2.6 = tripled.