Mobile Hard Drives Hit 500GB

Notebook PC disk storage leaps into the stratosphere today, hitting the half-terabyte mark with Hitachi Global Storage Technologies' announcement of a 500GB 2.5-inch mobile hard drive. Due out in February 2008, the $400 Travelstar 5K500 drive will dramatically expand the capacity possible in today's notebook PC designs.

Hitachi's announcement makes it the largest capacity mobile 2.5-inch hard drive. Previous high-water capacity marks for 2.5-inch drives included Fujitsu's 300GB drive and Toshiba's 320GB drive. Hitachi's jump to 500GB represents a whopping 36 percent increase in a single bound. (Hitachi also announced a 400GB version for $350.)

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13 Comments

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hhm.. that's nice (maybe I'll nab one when they are cheaper for my PS3)

how about we start investing some time and money in flash-based hard drives now plz

2.5" drives come in more than 1 size. There's the standard 9.5mm size and there's the 12.5mm size. Most drives come with 2 platters anyways, even the 9.5MM ones. That one just happens to use 3 platters (i think)

SSD's would come down in price if the HD manufacturers would quit bumping the storage capacity of these antiques,
and concentrate on SSD's.

naap51stang said,
SSD's would come down in price if the HD manufacturers would quit bumping the storage capacity of these antiques,
and concentrate on SSD's.

Don't talk tosh. Whilst SSD's are indeed the future, the fact that development of new designs based on old technology should cease is ridiculous! Hard Drives are standard and have will be for some time.

Wiggz said,

Don't talk tosh. Whilst SSD's are indeed the future, the fact that development of new designs based on old technology should cease is ridiculous! Hard Drives are standard and have will be for some time.

Hard Disk Drive technology is still being improved upon. Saying it is "old technology" is a bit preemptive if you ask me. SSDs (Solid State Drives?) are the future, but HDD development can co-exist with SDD development. How exactly is SDD development being hindered do you think? By resources?