Month Of ActiveX Bugs Reveals Critical Vulnerabilities

The latest Month of Bugs project, Month of ActiveX Bugs (MoAxB) started up on May 1 and has already found two critical flaws.

First off, Microsoft's ActiveX controls, used to make Web pages richer and more interactive, are vulnerable to a denial-of-service bug in Office OCX PowerPoint Viewer – an ActiveX control that enables software to communicate with Microsoft PowerPoint files. "A vulnerability has been identified in Office OCX PowerPoint Viewer, which could be exploited by remote attackers to cause a denial of service or take complete control of an affected system. This issue is caused by a buffer overflow error in "PowerPointViewer.ocx" when calling certain methods with overly long arguments, which could be exploited by remote attackers to execute arbitrary commands by tricking a user into visiting a specially crafted Web page," said a French Security Incident Response Team analyst.

The second reported bug, that Secunia rates as "highly critical", was posted by a researcher known only as shinnai who found several holes in a Excel Viewer OCX (confirmed in version 3.2.0.5). "The vulnerabilities are caused due to boundary errors within the Excel Viewer ActiveX control. These can be exploited to cause stack-based buffer overflows via overly long arguments passed to certain methods. Successful exploitation may allow execution of arbitrary code when a user visits a malicious Web site," wrote Secunia analysts.

News source: InformationWeek

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5 Comments

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Kushan said,
Isn't having a month of ActiveX bugs synonymous with a month of kicking a paraplegic monkey in the face?
lol Yes, but if you're already starved of attention, you'll enjoy that people watch you do it.

uhh its been 5 years since .net came out and Flash and Java have grown in popularity, barely anyone uses ActiveX anymore and even when they did they were aware of its security flaws.

black_death said,
uhh its been 5 years since .net came out and Flash and Java have grown in popularity, barely anyone uses ActiveX anymore and even when they did they were aware of its security flaws.

That's a pretty silly thing to say, considering both Java and Flash IE plugins are ActiveX objects. :cheeky:

And strictly speaking, none of these vulnerabilites are actually IN ActiveX, they're in plugins that are written as ActiveX objects.