More info on Lockheed Martin cyber attack revealed

More info has come to light on the recent cyber attack on the servers of Lockheed Martin, the US defense contractor. The company has admitted via a press release that its servers came under attack on Saturday, May 21. However the company added that its electronic security team "detected the attack almost immediately" and took steps to protect its data from being lifted. According to the press release, "our systems remain secure; no customer, program or employee personal data has been compromised." The press release added that it has kept the US government agencies informed about what happened. It states, "The team continues to work around the clock to restore employee access to the network, while maintaining the highest level of security."

Bloomberg reports that the US Department of Homeland Security along with the Department of Defense are indeed aware of the cyber attack against Lockheed Martin and has offered to help the company in its investigative efforts. According to a spokesperson for the US military, it expects that the impact of the cyber attack "is minimal and we don’t expect any adverse effect." Even US President Barack Obama was informed about the cyber attack. White House spokesperson Jay Carney stated, "Based on what I’ve seen, they feel it’s fairly minimal in terms of the damage."

As we reported on Saturday, Lockheed Martin uses the SecurID system created by the RSA unit of EMC Corp. Last March EMC Corp announced that a security breach resulted in info about RSA’s SecurID system being taken. It's currently unknown if the two incidents are related.

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18 Comments

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the best way to make people do what we want is to inspire fear about an unknown enemy, so the people give them the power to do as they please to save them from this said enemy...

If it is indeed China that did it, the US would say something about it then it would be let go like it has been before. If it was someone else, you can bet they will find out who it was (if they don't already).
Also, i doubt they would hack in and not compromise anything they must have been looking for "something"

So, where is the 'more info' section? I've read this exact thing on the news sites. There's nothing new, or more informative. ?

Why would a hacker play chicken with the United States Military. They have pretty advanced computers to help their suppliers track people down.

Nashy said,
Why would a hacker play chicken with the United States Military. They have pretty advanced computers to help their suppliers track people down.

Not to mention highly trained, well (over) paid network monitors.

Nashy said,
Why would a hacker play chicken with the United States Military. They have pretty advanced computers to help their suppliers track people down.

China doesn't afraid of anything.

hmmm me thinks with DOD and DHS onto it I don't think they'll be anonymous for long ofcourse if the hacker knows his stuff I maybe wrong in which case the DOD/DHS will be lead on a wild goose chase

Hate to say it, but with all the attack lately, it's only a short while before you will start to see some pretty extreme internet laws/regulations start kicking around. The US already started to install kill switch legislation, and these attacks seem to further push the agenda that the world's government(s) wants to head towards, but wants to fly under the radar on... total control of the web, not through content, but access.

Skin said,
Hate to say it, but with all the attack lately, it's only a short while before you will start to see some pretty extreme internet laws/regulations start kicking around. The US already started to install kill switch legislation, and these attacks seem to further push the agenda that the world's government(s) wants to head towards, but wants to fly under the radar on... total control of the web, not through content, but access.

Your right. I hate hackers, virus, and malware. They just make things so much more expensive and that security costs gets passed down to the consumer. They will also be responsible for what was a free internet to much more strict government regulation. Just sad.

Boyd Petersen said,

Your right. I hate hackers, virus, and malware. They just make things so much more expensive and that security costs gets passed down to the consumer. They will also be responsible for what was a free internet to much more strict government regulation. Just sad.

Why we can't have nice things. With the newer technology coming out with everything going electronic and small (including tables, mirrors) you'll expect security to be on the high and a new trend as it'll be easier for hackers to hack into these now. With most of everything going full electronic everything can be done easier and from afar as well. Being it stealing cc info, spying, etc.

offcourse they say nothing has been compromised.
wonder if they will find out who was behind these attacks, most likely not the same ones that hacked secureID. I'd sell that info if it was me who hacked secureID